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  • #43746
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    14 years ago?

    #43747
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    I actually just did a post about this:

    9/11

    On September 11, 2001 I was on Active Duty in the Navy. It was actually a nice, comfortable day with only a slight overcast where I was stationed. Only myself and a single Reservist were in our office and we were listening to the radio while I trained him on doing medical record verifications. We were listening to the local “shock jock” on the radio when they stopped the song they were playing to announce that an airplane had flown into one of the Twin Towers. About an hour later our entire command was gathered around a TV set in a commons area where our Commanding Officer passed what information there was about the situation and we started getting reports that some of our comrades in arms had been attacked at the Pentagon. It wasn’t until days later that we found out that some of our own had been killed………

    As it is with most tragedies, people tend to remember exactly when and where they were when they first heard the news. If you ask someone who was alive when Kennedy was shot, most will be able to tell you explicit details. My mother, for instance, used to tell me the color and style dress she was wearing when she heard about Kennedy.

    Although we, as humans and citizens of these United States, will forever remember our personal stories related to incidents such as 9/11 or Kennedy it is uncommon for us to remember to show the respect to the victims that things like this should require. I am ashamed that I can’t remember the names of the two people I knew that were murdered in the Pentagon attack, but I do remember their faces and the last time I saw them.

    Living on the West Coast, not very many people personally knew someone who died that fateful day. This might also be part of the reason why this anniversary is not as much of a deal for many that were so removed from the tragedy. That is truly a shame. If you ask someone from New York or even who was living on the East Coast, they will have very detailed stories and more than likely knew someone who lost their life that day. Some may even have been right in the mix of the chaos.

    All I know is this: Our country and world has not been the same since these attacks. I seriously doubt it will ever be even close to the same, at least in my lifetime. The fact that many schools refuse to cover 9/11 in class, many people ignore the date to just go on blissfully blind to the horror that day, and it has become almost another “trivia” question like Pearl Harbor as opposed to a day of remembrance is more than a shame. It is a slap in the face to those that perished in addition to those that survived.

    I humbly and simply ask that everyone take a moment and just ask whatever higher power they believe in to watch over the victims both alive and dead. I know that I do not just because it is right, but because it touched us all in one way or another…….

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #43748
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Sled,
    That’s a nice post.

    I was at home writting reports in my office. My wife called from the school she worked at and told me to turn on the tv. It wasn’t long before the second plane hit. I drove to the elementary school and took both of my kids out and brought them home. I wasn’t taking any chances and no one knew what was occuring. I called my boss and told him what was happening. I thought he should get everyone away from the windows (he didn’t). The office was across the street from Independence Hall in Philadelphia. As it turned out the other attacks hit the Pentagon and the crash in Pa.

    I was in 3rd grade living in Massachusetts when Kennedy was killed. We were in school when it happened. The school sent us home early, a lot of teachers were upset and crying and it seemed tense. No one told us kids anything about what had happened.

    #43749
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    Agreed – good post. I was in high school when Kennedy was killed. I don’t remember being inside the building, but I’m certain we were told what had happened, because we were released, and everyone knew. What I remember vividly is the mass of students walking across the school grounds on their way home early. It was an overcast, dreary day anyway, but that only added to the somber mood. I remember turning around, and I have a snapshot view in my mind of so many students in loose groups or just by themselves, almost no talking – just stunned.

    On 9/11 I was off that day, and we slept in, intending to just enjoy the day together and celebrate a significant event later that day. The phone rang, and one of our kids asked if we’d seen the news (we had not – hadn’t turned on the TV, just enjoying the quiet). At that point, only one tower had been hit. I had to believe it was a horrible accident, but something inside was worried it was not. Then #2 hit, and I have never been able to verbally describe the feeling(s) I felt at that moment, realizing we were under attack as a nation. And then the Pentagon, and the waiting for whatever else was to come. We were glued to the TV the rest of the day, like almost everyone else, but in our case, it was just the two of us. I’m sure we talked to some of our closest relatives, but I don’t recall anything except that first phone call. Finally, we decided we simply could not watch one more image of the 2nd plane going into the tower, or the images of the towers coming down, the white dust-covered people fleeing through the streets, the rolls of dust and smoke enveloping buildings and coming down streets. We were overloaded. We did not feel like eating, but hadn’t eaten all day, and decided we needed to get some food. We chose a steak house, hoping that perhaps it would just be quiet and we could be alone in our booth. Not a chance – every TV (and some not even normally out for use) was on – we could not escape it. I suppose we put some food down, but there was no enjoyment. Afterward we went to a nearby OfficeMax, and closed the place – just for something to do. It’s odd the things one remembers – and doesn’t. But the things that are remembered in events like that are burned into one’s brain.

    I have a Hawaiian friend who was five years old when Pearl Harbor was hit. Burned into his brain is racing across fields with his mother and siblings to get away from their base housing at Pearl Harbor, hoping to get away from the bombing. He couldn’t tell you what happened last month in some cases, but that event is burned into his brain. And he rarely talks about it.

    In a way, we are so fortunate in the U.S. 1941 and 2001 were the only external attacks in our modern history. Our geographic placement put us largely out of range – until now. But then we’ve also faced domestic incidents, such as Waco, OKC, Watts, etc. Still, we’re far more blessed than most, if not all other nations. We still (largely) have gun rights, unrestricted travel, a wide variety of food, somewhat decaying but still decent infrastructure, etc. As a former radio host titled his book years ago, “Pick a Better Country.” I don’t put down anyone else’s nation, because quite frankly I’m deeply saddened by ours going so far downhill, and inappropriately messing in others’ business. I just acknowledge and appreciate what I do still have, at least as long as we have it. But that’s why we’re all here.

    I appreciate all of you and your contributions – from everywhere. I learn much from you, particularly about circumstances we only just read about here in the States. Thanks.

    #43750
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    “Then #2 hit, and I have never been able to verbally describe the feeling(s) I felt at that moment, realizing we were under attack as a nation” Georgia Saint

    Exactly my sentiments, although I can say I was feeling a heathy dose of anger, one that has not gone away.

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 9 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
    #43753
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Out in the barn at my Uncle’s place getting stuff to go fix one of his rent houses. He came running out and told me to get inside. When I got there #2 was hit.
    Long screwed up day.
    Robin

    #43755
    Profile photo of Roadracer
    Roadracer
    Survivalist
    member7

    Was home for the day on vacation because my sister and her husband was visiting. After a long night of visiting the previous night I was the only one awake when the first plane hit. I remember waking everyone up thinking it was a terrible accident. As soon as I saw the second plane, my heart sank, like everyone else that day I knew our lives would never be the same.

    Several months later, I was back in Pennsylvania and spent the weekend with my youngest son who lives near Shanksville. That Saturday morning we drove over to the site. At that time, unless you knew someone in town, you didn’t know where to go. Later the local drugstore printed up directions to hand out. I’ll always hold the memory of my son and I holding each other and crying like babies. The spirit that resides in that field at the edge of the woods touched our hearts. I haven’t been back since.

    The people who died and their families are often in our prayers.

    #43756
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    On 9/11 I was at work and my boss the President was on vacation in Bermuda. My phone rings and it’s one of the other Vice Presidents calling me all excited on account a plane hit one of the WTC towers. She didn’t say it was a full sized passenger liner and being she’s one of those easily excitable types, I’m thinking it must have been a little piper cub or something and go back to work. Then I hear someone say a second plane hit the other tower and I realize something is happening. There was a TV in the main lobby and employees had started gathering there to watch. I saw both towers fall on live TV and can still remember the emotion of thinking I just watche0d what was probably thousands of people die, though of course we wouldn’t have known how many at that moment. I just knew that those buildings might have 100,000 people in them on a workday. Then the news is broadcasting from Washington DC and I see smoke in the background but the reporter is talking about NYC and I’m thinking something else just happened. It was the Pentagon of course. With the order to land all planes everywhere, people in the Sales & Marketing Dept start calling all of our sales reps around the country telling them they are authorized to use any means to get home and just charge it to the company, or to hunker down where they are and charge it to the company, whichever they were more comfortable with. The President calls me from Bermuda just to check in and make sure all of our employees that were traveling were OK. Sometime during all this that morning I call my wife and tell her the country is under attack, turn on the TV. At no time did I think we were personally at risk given where we lived, nor did we think our kids were at risk. Our son was a day student at a boarding school that stayed open so he came home at his usual time (in 11th grade and had his own car). Our daughter had gone for the day to some dance class in the outer suburbs of Boston. We figured she was far enough out of the city that she’d be OK if something happened in Boston. My wife tried calling her anyway but couldn’t reach her. Amazingly she never heard anything all day at the dance studio. Apparently the office towers in Boston had been evacuated just in case and there was an exodus out of the city. To speed the flow the Massachusetts Turnpike suspended tolls and were just waving people through as fast as they could but she didn’t know why they were doing that when she got on the turnpike to come home. Over the next several days I spent way too many hours mesmerized in front of the the TV, and in retrospect I realized that that is absolutely not what you should do come SHTF. Get moving and do whatever needs doing instead. The other thing I came to realize is that we shouldn’t have been so casual with the “the kids are OK, no need to get them home pronto”. There could have been a lot else going on that we didn’t know. Prior to 9/11 I was a bit of a prepper I suppose but I upped my game at that point and began prepping in a more purposeful way.

    As for Kennedy, I was in 5th grade but my classroom was in one of the academic buildings for the town’s new high school. The population of the town had exploded from 5,000 to 35,000 in 10 years and they couldn’t build schools fast enough. Mine was one of four 5th grade classes being housed at the high school in a building they didn’t need yet. So over the intercom comes an announcement that the President had been assassinated. Of course the high school kids would know what that meant but us 5th graders had no idea what the word assassinated meant. I could tell from the look on my teacher’s face that it was something real bad though. He of course then explained it to us. School didn’t get out early that day because in a sprawling suburban community virtually no one walked to school and the logistics of an early closing wouldn’t work. On the bus going home that day, the driver stopped several times to shout to bystanders what had happened. I remember him doing that a couple times as we drove through a golf course. People out golfing wouldn’t have known back in those pre-cell phone days.

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