Viewing 15 posts - 211 through 225 (of 351 total)
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  • #43730
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    I actually picked up a new backpack for my GHB. Until now I carried a variance of things in my truck and an empty bag so I could just grab what I needed. After reading several books and applying some common sense to various different hypothetical scenarios, I decided to create a singular bag with a modular design.

    I picked up one of these. I already had a pouch that fits on it so it gives me an additional, detachable bag.

    The only things I still have to pick up for a total GHB setup in a single package are:
    Swim fins
    Dive booties
    Horseshoe BC
    Archangel stock for my Mosin and couple extra mags

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #43738
    Profile photo of Roadracer
    Roadracer
    Survivalist
    member7

    This week was garden maintenance time. Harvested a lot herbs. Have been dehydrating them and putting excess in vacuum sealed bags. Lots of juicy tomatoes to enjoy. Have never dehydrated them. May give some of them a try. Enjoying the break in the heat so I can work outside. do not do well with heat and high humidity.

    #43740
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Finally located my potato pick in the cellar, jit. She wanted it and couldn’t find hers. It’s bow time so I decided to have some fun and bought a sling bow. The bad ass hunter. After a lot of adjusting I’ve gotten it working with a 31 inch arrow. It seems to have a 20-30 pound pull which they claim can be pushed up a bit. Maybe with a lot of practice I could hit a rabbit someday. Its really compact compared to a regular bow.

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 2 months ago by Profile photo of Brulen Brulen.
    #44028
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I bought a used wood stove yesterday and installed it in my basement fireplace. Biggest pain in the butt job I did in a long time. I’m really happy to get it in though, now I have a reliable heat source when the power goes out.

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 2 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
    #44030
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Good for you 74. A wood stove can literally be a lifesaver in a northern climate. Buy more wood than you think you’ll need.

    I’m heading off for my trip to Oyster Bay on Long Island. I have a good time on this annual junket but it makes me feel trapped down there nonetheless being you have to go through NYC to get off the island. In an emergency the limited ferry service to CT isn’t going to help very many people. It’s about 50 degrees here and we’re at the point where daytime highs are 60’s/70’s and nighttime lows 30’s/40’s and even warmer down there so here I am in shorts and short sleeves putting some winter attire in my truck just in case I were to be stranded and had to hoof it home. I threw in my bolt cutter which I don’t normally do but it was on my mind. Sometimes I envy the clueless who never have to think about these things.

    #44031
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    I quit heating with wood in 1992 after moving to a new house and was never comfortable with not having a backup heating system. The peace of mind this gives me is enormous.

    #44032
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    That is good news 74. The house I live has two fireplaces, can you believe it in Miami, Florida. The houses that were built in the 1920’s all have fireplaces here. My home was built in 1923. Even tho I use it only when it goes down to the 40’s it is still good to have here. Wood is a problem here since no one uses wood for heating.

    #44033
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Freedom,
    I suppose you would end up paying premium prices for fire wood living in an urban area. I do most of my shopping for this kind of thing on craigslist

    #44093
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Here is a huge prep. I reached agreement today with a neighbor to buy another 10 acres adjacent to my property. The entirety of this property is usable. Currently there is a fenced in sheep pasture used by a local farmer, a hay field used by another local farmer, and a baseball field used by the kids in town. I’m leaving it all as is. What I am telling people is we wanted to protect our view by not having a house get built next door, nor a solar field which seems to be happening all over the place. Those reasons are real, but behind all that of course is that it is good land and maybe someday it will make a real difference for our family.

    #44098
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    Great move on your part.

    #44100
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    NICE! Congratulations. That should give you a greater feeling of peace and security when that’s a hard commodity to come by these days.

    #44108
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    GS & 74, we are paying what I consider a premium for it being it is worth more to me as an abutter than anyone else, though the owners think they’re discounting it on account they know any other buyer would develop it in some fashion and they’d just as soon leave it as is. We’ll now have 26 flat acres in VT, a rarity in these parts.

    #44131
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    I contacted a well drilling outfit today. Set up an appointment for next week so they can survey the ground and find a good spot to drill a potable water well. Don’t need a “permit” or anything.

    That’s the good news. The bad news, is that punching a hole in the ground is going to be over 2k. More, with the mandatory water quality testing…

    I think it’s pretty cool that if someone wants a well, to just think it up and do it. Getting the water tested for chemicals and parasites, etc, I was going to do anyways. Still kinda pricey…

    After that, then comes pipes, filters, freeze-proof well head, pressure, etc…

    Not a small undertaking, but having our own independent water supply is starting to look more and more attractive…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #44132
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Excellent Malgus. If possible, add a hand pump to it as insurance against the grid going down long term. We have a Simple Pump on ours. http://www.simplepump.com/

    #44135
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Thanks for bird-dogging that MB…

    I could go a couple different ways with this… Drill guy said that a 220v pump would be the best option, but that would still leave us beholden. Was thinking about a small pump on a pump/deep cycle battery/inverter/solar cell all cobbled together in a small pump house… then there’s the hand pump idea…

    I could still go with the dedicated pump, then lay back the hand pump in case things go South… still, pressure is an issue. Our water pressure here is absolute dog sh*^…. there’s pretty much only a couple ways to get pressure from a well – Artesian, where the water is pressurized as it comes from the ground naturally (yeah, like I’m gonna get that lucky), gravity (having a big water tower on my property is not an option) and then a critter to pressurize the water in the house…

    Still, it would be a net benefit to my son and others living here, decades down the road… so long as the filters held out, the water would be primo. Even with filters cobbled together after our supply were exhausted, it would still be pretty good water…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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