Viewing 15 posts - 121 through 135 (of 171 total)
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  • #16890
    Profile photo of ronym
    ronym
    Survivalist
    member5

    reading and learning about natural healing and pharmacology of known plant / herb.
    because in SHTF scenario health institution more likely will “serving” high priority people such as gov official, staff, military, etc ( we civilian are the bottom of the list, if any medical staff are available )
    in post SHTF especially post Nuclear War, big chance are there will be no big health institution.
    because lot of hospital, medical staff, pharmacy industry, etc are destroyed or killed by war.
    .
    so we must have another plan to take care ourself and family health ( not relying only in big health care institution )
    .
    one of example are sugar cane root and stem, are capable to cure diabetes, cardiac, antipiretic ( fever reliever ). contrary to modern use of sugar cane for sugar, which is one of the process are boiling sugar cane stem. final product are sugar which is trigger for diabetes.
    .
    another research also revealing about amazing uses of grass
    yes you read correctly… grass
    especially its root, are using for thousand of year ( in china and asia ) to cure urinary problem

    #16897
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Robin,

    About your mouse problem… our old farmhouse had a mouse problem too. The little turds got into everything, and it is most annoying. I can sympathize. Really.

    We don’t have a mouse problem now.

    Step 1. Plug up and/or stopper the holes. Any crack that is 1/4″ wide, they can fit through, so plug that up too.

    Step 2. Traps. Lots of traps. We prefer the old fashioned Victor traps. You don’t need the huge tactical nuke model. That just makes a mess. Trust me. The small ones will be fine. Mice love, love, love peanut butter. We use Jiff Extra Chunky. Place your traps along walls, behind and between appliances, under desks, etc. Even in ventilation ducts. Check them every day.

    Step 3. Barn cats. We had 3. Now we’re down to 2 (one died of old age). Even if you don’t like cats, get them. If you feed them once a day – in the morning – they’re fine and will stick around for the free eats. But they get hungry at night and night is when mice are active. Since establishing these protocols, we have not seen a mouse – or even signs of mice, like poo or holes chewed in stuff – in almost 3 years despite having a full larder downstairs, a full pantry upstairs and all sorts of crap that mice like…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #16927
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Malgus,
    Step 1 – Doing that now. Using expanding foam mixed with powered cement.
    Step 2 – Using “glue traps.” For some reason mice around here did not go for peanut butter.
    Step 3 – Two major reasons there are no cats here: Two 80lb Labs that use cats as toys.

    I have actually caught two snakes inside the house. Guess they chased mice into their holes and followed. Now they worked and dogs did not bother them. I did not know about the snakes until they were caught in the glue traps. I hate snakes so keeping them inside the house is out.
    Robin

    #16970
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Sounds horrible, Robin. I haven’t tried this advice yet. Got it from a lady working at a pet shop that also sell snakes. She said I should put snakes feces in the roof. The rats then leave..

    #17936
    Profile photo of Anselm
    Anselm
    Survivalist
    member6

    Robin, Malgus gave you perfect advice, but I think you’re making one mistake: the expanding foam with powdered cement will not usually work; the horrid little critters will eat right through it. You’ve got to mix something into the goo that will make it impossible for them to chew. Recommendations: ground glass, shards of metal, wire screen pieces … you get the idea.

    DID the foam with cement work? In my experience, it hasn’t. I had a friend who had mice so he decided that he would massacre them with traps. He bought 54 snap traps and placed them all over the house. He left and came back hours later. Guess how many mice his traps had caught?

    Fifty-four!!!

    He was desperate. I told him that there was probably a gap where his water pipes, both intake and drain, went into and out of the house. We checked and, sure enough, there was quite a gap. He proceeded to fill the gap with the same expanding foam, etc. that you used, and he had to do it over and over because the mice were drilling through it before he had even finished spraying. I insisted that he use the ground glass or metal shards; he did, and it worked like a charm.

    May your ordeal be over.

    #17938
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Foam trick did not work. Started pulling everything away from the walls. In one little room, started off as porch and then enclosed, I found tons of debris. Have to get further into the room to find the hole. SOBs chewed into one of my favorite Mosins!
    Went to Wal-Mart and bought all their glue traps. Set them out yesterday. Little critters still kicking today. Couple of them fought the traps so much they scooted across the room.
    My two 80 Labs love cats, as chew toys.
    Robin

    #18948
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Collapsing in a heap very shortly at the end of the day! What I did today:
    – harvested 270 pounds of 3 potato varieties
    – harvested 30 pounds of tomato
    – harvested 2 -50 ft rows of beans, same of squash/cukes (didn’t weigh yet)
    – harvested 1/2 row of carrots and lettuce
    – winnowed 25 acres of hay – no rain expected next few days – then baling
    – just finished splitting 2 cords of wood with wood splitter (too tired to stack)
    – worked with the draft/cross and cart for an hour
    – watched my great-nephew for his mother for a while

    Time for BIG salad and a big, fat steak (raised on my place)
    Tomorrow I use my scythe and harvest my big patch of soy beans…and more. Doesn’t stop this time of year.

    #18949
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Canning tuna. We like to get it fresh.

    #18950
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tweva
    I would love to learn about all the different methods you are using to grow potatoes. Would you start a thread some rainy day on potatoes?

    #18956
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    tweva, I also would likewhat 74 is asking for + how do you keep the bugs away?

    #19008
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    74 – yes I will if you’d like. I love the darn things. Easy to grow as well and so prolific.

    #19009
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Dear Freedom –

    Bugs! I can well understand the frustration. This year I think is the year of the Japanese Beetle. I have never seen so many. Every year there seems to be one particular bug that predominates.

    How to deal with them really depends on your ‘philosophy’ of gardening. I don’t mean to be vague. You can either blast the things with chemicals, hand pick them, follow an organic pest control method or variation/philosophy and practice or…do nothing and let Mother Nature just do what she does for whatever reason she does it!

    Now for me? I don’t like using a lot of the normal, non-organic chemicals. Not only is it expensive but I also don’t like adding it to my soil or food I am going to eat.However, that said, I also don’t like bugs destroying my crops, especially since I grow a lot of my own food and depend on it to feed myself!

    So, first of all I spend a lot of time and energy paying attention to and adding good compost to the soil to make sure it is healthy and thus the plants are healthy as possible to help them survive the onslaught of bugs.A really healthy plant in healthy soil can still perform well with some bugs attacking it.

    Then, I pay LOTS of attention to the varieties and types of plants/seeds I grow – and only grow those that are best for my climate zone AND are known to be more pest resistant to other varieties.

    And, when I do plant I pay attention to WHERE I plant things in relation to other plants, because some plants or companion plants will naturally help ward off bugs on a different type of plant near it.

    I do use organic sprays and pest control methods. One I have to do (haven’t had time before since moving here – but must make it this year!) is to use milky spore to control the Japanese Beetles next year. I also spray my dwarf fruit trees every 10 or so days – or I would have no fruit!

    That said, I don’t have a lot of time, so when I designed my main food garden I took the bug problem into account and I built large frames that I slide on top of all of my raised beds that are covered in a very fine screening. This keeps most of the bugs out and off of the plants to begin with. I also do put fine net over all of my fruit trees, not just for the bugs but also because the birds will attack the fruit happily otherwise – particularly my cherry trees! It was a pain to build the frames, and is an dded chore to net the trees – but in the long run – I am always glad this time of year that I did it. My field crops are an entirely different matter! Any bugs on them (usually corn borer) aren’t as much a problem as the wildlife.

    Let me guess – you have a problem with bugs on your tomato plants maybe? The subject of bugs is a big, complicated one. If you are having problems with any particular types of plants I could try and help if I am able Freedom.

    But all of this takes time, practice and thought.

    #19011
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Today:

    Install some new track lighting at one of my retail stores
    Do business-related paperwork for a few hours
    Bale hay for 4 hours or so
    Wash, sort and store harvested stuff from yesterday and lay out to dry
    Late day – hopefully can some green beans and corn in make shift outdoor kitchen

    #19012
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Yes tomato plants is a problem. I had stop growing the large tomato because they would get bugs all over them. This year I have grown cherry tomato and still get some bugs but am able to grow so many that it was OK for the plants. I am not using any chemicals on them.

    On my orange tree I get the brown caterpillar type of bug. I am using Ortho fruit tree insect killer and it is working but I need to add more every time it rains a lot.

    The tomato trees get all the bugs, the green caterpillars, the brown caterpillars, beetles, and other bugs. It is bad with the tomatoes.

    I grow lettuce at the start of Oct to March and the lettuce get very little bugs for some reason, or the bugs here do not like the lettuce.

    #19025
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Today is slice and dehydrate some zucchini, squash and cucumbers.
    Robin

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