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  • #8485
    Profile photo of Danie Theron
    Danie Theron
    Survivalist
    member3

    Human contact is a fact of life and in most realistic scenarios will be unavoidable. You need to have a way to look at the people you cross paths with and make a determination, to the best of your ability, if they are a threat. I want to share what is considered to be a professional gold standard. All persons you come across should be discriminated in the following sequence:

        Whole Person
        Hands
        Waistline
        Immediate Area (or carried items)
        Demeanor

    The discrimination process is very quick and becomes second nature with minimal practice. The more you do it, the faster and more efficient you become. It allows the practitioner to use the power of observation efficiently and identify potential problems early.

    With multiple group members using this process, you have the additional benefit of overlap. This results in multiple sets of eyes looking at the same person. Focus on discriminating people in the following priority: Unknown first, then Neutral, followed lastly by Known.

    Everyone gets a glance, some more than others. You can apply this to urban combat operations, solo traveling, static security, group situations, and virtually every scenario you are in where you encounter other humans and there is a chance that they are not all the enemy.

    Lastly, don’t get married to your first discrimination of a person. First impressions and gut feelings are very important, but they are not flawless. We have all been wrong at times. If you encounter someone who passes first discrimination – then, later exhibits a sign or behavior that causes their threat status to change – be prepared to react very quickly and decisively to the new reality that you have been presented with.

    #8487
    Profile photo of Danie Theron
    Danie Theron
    Survivalist
    member3

    Let me know if you need clarification on anything.

    #8494
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Interesting. Thank you. I used to pay a lot of attention to hands, as an artist, but need to renew that observation as part of your sequence.

    #8508
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Thoughtful post. Thanks for sharing it. I typically have this orientation in situational awareness.

    #8550
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Learning about body language and having situational awareness can make a huge difference. That’s why getting intoxicated in an unknown environment with others, isnt the best idea if you want to play safe.

    We also cover this in our upcoming “Survival Bootcamp” course. One exercise you can do to practice your awareness is trying to spot everything red people wear. Then switch and spot everyone who has their hands in their pockets… then switch to everyone who wears a top with a collar… you get the idea.

    We process many clues automatically in our subconsciousness, it is very helpful to train yourself to be able to switch to a more aware state of mind.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #8717
    Hannah
    Hannah
    Survivalist
    member6

    Awesome! Thanks for this, Danie.

    #8722
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    When you get involved in fights, after some time you develop ability to quickly “judge” people and possible danger that may come from them.
    One of the important mark for me to determine that is stand (pose, posture) of person who may be danger for you.
    Of course it is not like 6th sense, it is quick observation like Danie Theron wrote.

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