Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 34 total)
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  • #8522
    Profile photo of Danie Theron
    Danie Theron
    Survivalist
    member3

    In any urban SHTF scenario, there is always the chance of gun fighting and shooting. It may be by police trying to maintain order against armed looting mobs. It could also be a full-on civil war. It may be due to attack by a foreign army. It might also be criminal gangs trying to establish control of areas. Or, in some situations, it is a combination of several of these things.

    If you are in an urban area, you are going to be thrust in the middle of it. You can try to stay away from the thick of things and reduce your exposure. However, eventually it will effect your life and the way you must act.

    I am not here trying to preach to anyone about how guns are great. I know there are probably some readers who don’t like guns, are scared by guns, or generally don’t feel comfortable around them. I understand. What I will tell you is this – when you need a gun there is no substitute. Not a knife, not an axe, not a stick, not a brick. In urban unrest or warfare – IT IS THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT TOOL you can have. Possessing a gun, the ability to use it proficiently, and the use of good tactics can absolutely be the difference maker in making it through. You don’t have to like guns, but just think of them as a vital tool you need to be comfortable using.

    With that in mind, here are some tactics tips to help you increase your chances of survival.

    LOOK: Scan all around you high and low – constantly searching over and back again. Keep you head up as you walk and take advantage of peripheral vision. Look down briefly to be sure of your path and areas that may hide someone at foot level (storm drains) but generally, keep your head up. Be watching for things that don’t seem right or strike you as odd. Be efficient by looking at places where people have to be – not places they cannot be. For instance, roof lines, open windows, trees, doorways, vehicles, etc. Anywhere someone can hide. People are not to be found in big brick walls, ponds, etc. so they don’t need the same type of attention.

    COVER V. CONCEALMENT: If you are shot at, get behind cover. Cover is something that will stop bullets. A dirt mound, a concrete road barrier, concrete pillar, and heavy tracked machinery are all examples. Telephone poles and vehicles are a type of temporary cover. They might suck up a few bullets, but a professional will get on you quick and work those items over in a way that there is no escape from. You might have to use temporary cover (car or telephone pole) for a quick pause, but don’t loiter there. Concealment is something that does not protect you from bullets, but does hide you visibly. Examples are bushes, trees, picket fences, thin walls, trash bins, etc.
    Always use concealment and cover to move by going from piece to piece and taking paths which take you out of the line of sight as much as possible. If shooting starts, forget concealment and move only from hard cover to hard cover.
    MOVEMENT DURING A FIREFIGHT: It should be done as fast as possible. If you are in an alley way and have to run across a street into another alley way, get back as far as possible and try to build up speed so you are crossing into the open area at your terminal speed. The rule is to leave cover moving as fast as you are able and to over run your new cover. – This leaves your time in the kill zone minimal.

    SUPRESSIVE FIRE: Follow the same guidelines of “looking”. Focus on lower volume aimed suppressive fire. Put rounds where people have to be: windows, picket fences, doorways, trees. There is no value in burning rounds indiscriminately into walls and the sides of buildings.

    That is all for now.

    #8578
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Danie Theron, Thanks for the info, I am in the city so a lot of this information will be used.

    #8580
    Profile photo of Edheler
    Edheler
    Survivalist
    rreviwer

    Get good firearms training while you can. Start with Appleseed and then progress to others as your budget, time and skills require.

    #8594
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Get good firearms training while you can. Start with Appleseed and then progress to others as your budget, time and skills require.

    People in the US have so many great options for firearms training. Do you know if they are open to foreigners as well? One of my best friends is in the US military and he took me to a shooting range but that was about it.

    I would love to get some more serious training.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #8598
    Profile photo of Edheler
    Edheler
    Survivalist
    rreviwer

    Other than the big negative of having to deal with traveling to the US there is nothing illegal about non-citizens handling weapons while they are here. As I understand it there is a fair amount of firearm tourism that happens on the west coast from Japan.

    Your biggest problem is likely to be finding loaner firearms. It is worth inquiring with the people offering the training to find out if there is any way to use borrowed firearms. Usually purchasing ammunition while here isn’t a big deal but .22LR is hard to find today.

    I believe that it is also mostly legal to bring firearms into the country for training or sporting purposes. You would have to be careful though since the largest international airports are in states with very restricted firearm laws.

    Oh, and make sure you don’t fire any weapons for at least a day before you try to leave the country. The TSA sniffers will catch powder residue from shooting firearms if you have to go through one.

    #8601
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Very excellent post. Bushrat has been instilling some of this (concealment vs. cover) into me… Your suggestions re: where to focus and where to not waste bullets, is also excellent. Thanks!

    #8604
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Edheler,
    Good post, people need to know what will stop rifle fire and it’s not trees and 1/8 th thick dumpsters. A 357′ will penetrate the steel wheels on a car (not plus the brake rotor as well).

    Tourist can certainly use weapons here but they need to be careful of the laws of each state. Paticularly tansportation and possession. If they rent or borrow at a range no problem. In some states (New Jersey & Maryland come to mind) transportation of a firearm must be from residency to point of legal sporting use. So having one in the trunk on the way to work then to the range is a no no. Same with ammo, no hollow points in NJ.

    #8608
    Profile photo of Edheler
    Edheler
    Survivalist
    rreviwer

    Good post, people need to know what will stop rifle fire and it’s not trees and 1/8 th thick dumpsters. 357′ will penitrate the steel wheels on a car (not plus the brake rotor as well).

    Generally I don’t overwhelm people with cover/concealment issues until after they are a good shot. I see far too many shooters who thought they were good shots fail to score rifleman at an Appleseed. I preach the same lesson that most sport coaches do: good fundamentals before everything else.

    I think it’s easier to just let people know if they are thinking of taking firearms training within the US but are not citizens I wouldn’t do it in any of the following states: California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island or the District of Columbia.

    #8623
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    1974t150v Now you have me buying sand bags! Not joking!

    #8626
    Profile photo of osagemarine
    osagemarine
    Survivalist
    member3

    For those that want to come into the US for training there are several schools which have loaner guns or even require you to shoot their guns. If you’re going to bring you’re own weapons in – first check with CBP on line – I would recommend flying in to Los Vegas, Houston or Miami. Those are all international airports in gun friendly states. Avoid the north east and California if at all possible.

    Cover vs. Concealment. Remember during the first few days, the walls of a normal residence are concealment (if you know that someone is using a window to fire/observe) and you can shoot at them through the walls. Cinder block, brick, and concrete structures I wouldn’t waste my ammo (unless you have 7.62 US black tips), but a building with siding or stucko I would be willing to fire IF needed. If you are useing 5.56/.223, you will want a supply of the military green tip rounds to punch through walls; if you only have 55 grn hollow points, save your ammo. After the first few days people will have everything they can lay their hands on to give them better cover.

    #8723
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Thanks Ed, sounds great. I will look into this. I wont bring any guns, but most likely take the training with some friends in the US who might bring their own. Maybe I find a way to combine some hiking with some shooting practice / training.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #8814
    Profile photo of Danie Theron
    Danie Theron
    Survivalist
    member3

    Jay, I also am working on some info for you, but have not had time to do it justice. Sorry for the delay and hope to have a complete post soon.

    #8824
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    As an instructor I have a bunch of stuff available but to tailor what I post a bit, what sort of training are you most after?

    #8855
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Whirlibird, I think you should start posting from the beginning. What I mean is if a am a new student and I want to start learning what would be my first lesion, then go from there, second lesion and so on.

    This would be very good for some that do not have any training. I would read them all.

    What do you think?

    #8872
    Profile photo of Edheler
    Edheler
    Survivalist
    rreviwer

    I am a NRA and Appleseed instructor. Most people, even those who think otherwise, don’t have very good shooting fundamentals. I recommend that people who live in the US, attend Appleseed events until they can score rifleman on demand. Very nearly everything they learn then applies to other firearm schools and classes they might attend. Appleseed is the only program that I am aware of that has a low enough cost (max $80 for a weekend and less for women and children) and happens often enough (over 1000 events a year all over the country) that attending a one a month is within the budget of just about anyone. Some skills can be book learned but shooting is mostly about building up muscle memory and good habits through repetition. Appleseed has made me a much better pistol shooter by my application of the fundamentals I learned. Even people who are already very good shooters tend to learn something at Appleseed if they come with our only requirement which is a ‘teachable attidude’.

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