Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 32 total)
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  • #9880
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Forgot! Also important to learn how to carry/move injured/sick people safely. Here is a PDF from American red Cross to print keep.

    Also know/practice or have on hand a stretcher. Here’s basic how to make one (click) – you can even make from duck tape (LUV that stuff – be sure have lots of it on hand IMHO – very useful stuff) (click)

    When you ride horses it is amazing….no one ever seems to fall off/get injured anywhere near home. Always out in the middle of freaking nowhere and you need a stretcher to get them out/back to real help.

    HTH

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    #9897
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    tweva, Thank you for the pdf file. My Mother is 82 and my Father is turning 85 in Sept some I know my sister will not be helping me so I have to take care of them when the time comes.

    Happy Easter.

    #10243
    Hannah
    Hannah
    Survivalist
    member6

    This thread is absolutely great.
    Thanks so much for your knowledge everyone!

    #15183
    Profile photo of Broadside
    Broadside
    Survivalist
    member3

    My # 1 beyond all of the very important items already listed would be a way for EVERYONE to wash their hands, and PPE for the caregivers.  Cases, not boxes of gloves and masks with face shields.

     A couple jumbo sized alcohol based hand sanitizer would go a long way too, but nothing beats good old soap and water- especially for those alcohol resistant fecal-oral maladies like C-diff.  Even if the water isn’t exactly drinking water quality you can still wash and then use some purell or equivalent afterwards to ward off the evil spirits.

    #17702
    Profile photo of Anselm
    Anselm
    Survivalist
    member6

    Doctors tell me that they are opposed to QuikClot because they are forced to remove it before they themselves can treat the wound. It’s a powder that goes all over the place and causes them great annoyance.
    They prefer that we use a compression bandage instead.

    #17714
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Thank you for the info Anselm. I think that the compression bandages is a good thing to have. Also have many other medical supplies since in a SHTF there maybe no Hospitals open.

    #17716
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Onions! – Really work great.
    If you have someone in your house sick do this:
    Peel a large onion and cut it in half. Put each half on a plate or such with cut side up. Put one on each side of the sick person. Next morning look at the onion, it will be black. Onions are magnets for germs. Another reason for throwing away any part of an onion you will not use. Even putting the cut onion in a bag does not help that much.
    Robin

    #17717
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    ….”Put one on each side of the sick person”…meant at night when the person goes to bed. On the headboard, night stands or such. Not in the bed!
    Robin

    #17722
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Careful – My doctor friends believe it is an urban legend – http://urbanlegends.about.com/od/medical/a/swine_flu_facts_onions_and_flu.htm

    #17732
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    My suggestion isn’t about what to have but how to store it.

    I’ve found that keeping track of what has been used or removed from the meds/equipment supply can be difficult as it’s not always obvious to sight if things are jumbled [as they can be when items are grabbed and not neatly arranged again].

    There are a number of ways of keeping track, such as dedicated trays, boxes, containers for each type of item [and labeled] can more readily show if something is missing, or elasticized compartments sewn onto fabric can do the same thing. No doubt other ways of making missing supplies more obvious can be thought of.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

    #17758
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>elijah wrote:</div>My suggestion isn’t about what to have but how to store it.
    I’ve found that keeping track of what has been used or removed from the meds/equipment supply can be difficult as it’s not always obvious to sight if things are jumbled [as they can be when items are grabbed and not neatly arranged again].

    Great advice. This is often overlooked. I found myself a couple of times in the past with my small first aid pack and some crucial stuff in it was missing (like anti reflux medication for example). I have now established a routine so I check always on the first of each month my first aid pack and some other preps I carry along often.

    Its overkill to do this every month but easy to remember and do. I spend like 5 minutes on checking my commonly used stuff but can be sure I wont be caught with my pants down when I need it.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #17759
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    I’ve got a few transparent/ see through plastic containers. They stack on top on each other. I find it easier to put certain medications together for example one for flu meds; one for stomach ailments; one with burn shield/ bandages/ plasters; one general tables and headache type medications. They’ve got different color handles – I know which one to grab.

    I’ve also enjoy different herbal tea’s – good to relax with and enjoy with fresh mint or ginger. One should try and learn about all the good “still alive” plants that keeps you healthy. The best way to stay healthy is to eat healthy

    #17760
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Interesting info about the onions. Will give it a try next flu season.

    #17763
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Good points, onion is considered here natural remedy for centuries, and it is something like help for lot of things.
    Everything including cold, flu, pneumonia, appetite problems etc.
    And of course it is good against evil spirits as old folks says :)

    #17768
    Profile photo of Anselm
    Anselm
    Survivalist
    member6

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Robin wrote:</div>….”Put one on each side of the sick person”…meant at night when the person goes to bed. On the headboard, night stands or such. Not in the bed!<br>
    Robin

    Robin, I have used onions for medical purposes for something like half a century. They are a surefire cure for many ailments. But I put them right on myself, not on the night-table; I cut off a slice of onion, heat it slightly, wrap it in ONE layer of gauze and tape it to the wound or sore; every two hours, I replace the slice with a fresh one. It works like magic. It both draws poison out of the body and disinfects a wound. Now I don’t use them in bed, but, if it were a major wound, I would — we could figure out how to clean off the mattress later … I guess I would protect the mattress with a waterproof tarp. You may use the onion slices unheated, but experience has shown me that they work more intensely if lightly heated; and I do want them in contact with the skin, with just one layer of gauze in between. When I was badly poisoned, the onion actually helped to open a big pore in my skin and make the poison flow out like a stream — and, yes, I did have to do an awful lot of washing afterwards; but it was worth it.

    General Ulysses S. Grant, during the Civil War, was himself so aware of the disinfecting power of onions that he flatly refused to enter into battle unless Congress provided him with two wagonloads of onions before each fight.

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