Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 32 total)
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  • #9681
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    A collection of medical/health supplies, equipment, etc. is essential. I think it would contain items as complex or as simple as someone’s capability and experience. It would be interesting to see what variety of equipment and supplies different people have based on there history, experience, and profession. A field medic with the military, or nurse / dr. or other medical professional would have such a wide base of knowledge and ability to use more complex equipment compared to a layman with standard first aid. Someone with vast wilderness/outdoor survival experience may provide some great items/tips from that perspective also.

    We don’t have a specific room per say at home it’l be a room likely far from the rest at the bol we have a separate off building that can be set up , but we do have a significant (relatively I guess) supply of Emergency/Standard First Aid supplies. (Band aids, gauze, antiseptics, triangular bandages, splints, etc.)
    Aside from the standard supplies which I don’t think needs to be listed, we also keep:

    • Epi-Pen
    • Antihistamines, Various Pain relievers/anti inflammatories, OTC pharmaceuticals for heart burn, diarrhea, constipation, infection, etc.
    • Suture Kit
    • Saline Solution (changed periodically)
    • alcohol (for infection control on surfaces)
    • Various First Aid books
    • boxes of rubber gloves (both sterile, & non)
    • face mask,3M 1860/1860S N95 Health Care Particulate Respirator Surgical Masks
    • “Quikclot” (brand name, don’t know the name of the chemical to pour on wounds.)
    • couple 1/2″ wood dowels (to be used with trian. bandages as tournequet.)
    • drop sheets
    • Duct tape
    • garbage bags, different sizes….lots!
    • crutches
    • Wheelchair
    • portable shower
    • sheets

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #9685
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Add bedpans and hospital (folding) bedside commode. And a folding walker–useful even with a bad back.

    Peroxide can be used to kill germs even on delicate body surfaces (OK, gross, but I take a tiny camping bottle with me to wipe off the backsplash from squatty-potties in India–too many diseases to risk not doing that). Betadine for further germicidal qualities on skin and suture sites.

    I remember, many years ago, having quaternary ammonia tablets on our farm. Dissolved them in water to make a powerful germicidal solution. Did an emergency rumenottomy on a calf once, doused the site with the solution, sutured her up, and she walked away and survived just fine.

    Epsom salts, the old-timey cure for soaking infected areas in hot solution. Also useful as a strong laxative. Some rural people claim it is helpful with snakebite but don’t know the facts.

    A heavy plastic sheet for tucking under a patient to give them a sponge bath, or when using the bedpan, when the patient is very weak. A few adult diapers might be needed in extreme cases…

    Just some thoughts. I took care of my grandfather for his final 3 years; my Dad during his final cancer; and Bushrat during his amputations and recovery. No nursing degree, but learned a few things.

    #9687
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    A cheap way to make a few cots for this would be.
    yoga mats or self inflating camping mats then cut 1/2 inch plywood to the same size as the mats. If you wish you could also cut out handle holes at the same time in case you need to move the person. Place the board on four bricks or buckets to give it height.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #9688
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    I highly recommend for every one to take a first aid course (and refreshers every 3 years!). While I can read a book on homesteading or guns mitring, first aid training is really meant to be learned hands on. There’s also no time for someone to dig through a book during an emergency. Finally, for about $100 and a weekend, this is a small investment to make that could serve you not only after SHTF but any day, any time.

    $600 and a week (or a couple of weekends) can get you a medical first responder certification. Each groups should have someone trained (and equipped) at that level in my very humble opinion.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #9697
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Gypsy, Very good list of the main items! I would add Hydrogen Peroxide.

    #9698
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    I forgot to add with the drop cloths, Shower curtains and rings. Thank you Freedom. Wildartist great additions.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #9700
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    flu

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #9704
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Nice Gypsy, I am always thinking what I have if it is a flu or cold, this will help.

    #9707
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    I agree with taking first aid course, knowledge is key, but do not stop there, there is a lot to learn without going to medical school or college.

    Off course there are lot of nonsense on line, but still you can learn useful stuff from medical field that you gonna need when SHTF.
    First aid course is great, and covers a lot important topics, but it is not about prolonged or in depth care.
    It is just start, after that go and learn how to (for example) take prolonged wound care, antibiotic usage, cleaning drainage, debridement…

    It is good list Husky, it can be always longer just like with any prepper list.

    #9733
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Selco I agree. Right now I have been watching a home care nurse come into my fathers home and do Sterile Wet-to-Dry Dressing Changes and wound packing on my father. He asked for me to be there so I can get the idea of what has to be done.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #9744
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    I want to suggest a couple of things.

    One is that, from what I’ve seen, med supplies can be run through quite quickly, especially if there is bleeding. The amount of gauze and bandages used in treating wounds can be huge, so don’t assume you have enough and always look to get some more.

    The other thing is to consider how you will dispose of contaminated or infected material in a crisis situation. With no safe waste collection taking place you may want to either burn it, or bury it if smoke might compromise security. Others may have some suggestions about this.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

    #9750
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    I dont have a safe waste collection, other then us loading our garbage up. And then taking it to the dump our selfs. That would change to using masks and such in and out of the dump as well.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #9751
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    elijah and Gypsy if at the time you need to save on the gauze in a SHTF what you do is place the gauze first then some cloth over it so the gauze is the only thing touching the bleeding. But yes gauze is always better but we may run low.

    #9831
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Great list, will become very useful when we settle down at our homestead and get our preps in order again. (We are in a bit of disarray right now and most of them sit in a container in a warehouse at the other side of the city).

    I like this what wildartist wrote.

    A heavy plastic sheet for tucking under a patient to give them a sponge bath, or when using the bedpan, when the patient is very weak. A few adult diapers might be needed in extreme cases…

    Im a firm believer you can not have enough heavy duty plastic sheets in a survival scenario. That along with waterproof quality duct tape can make a lot messy situations much more pleasant.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #9879
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    I took care of my mother for 2 years at home before she died. As I write, my 88 yr old father will now be coming to live with me and I will be taking care of him. Have also taken care of various other family members over extended illnesses.

    Other than supplies and training in what to do for first aid/medical treatments I think it’s important to learn how to handle doing things for a patient that can not leave the bed.

    Learn how to change sheets with a person in the bed. Learn how to move them in the bed safely. Learn now. Makes care much easier when you have confidence/know how to do these things.

    Here is a video of how to make a bed with a person in it. I’d like to recommend you watch the other videos in the series too.

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