Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)
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  • #6089
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    Who here is studying what arts/systems and how do they ‘rate’ them…?

    Myself I train in Kapap, some of the purer lineage Krav Maga, heavily subscribe to Rory Millers thinking on the ‘7 sides of self defense training’, and firearms is split between ‘point shooting’ for pistols and long range work for rifles.

    Just curious what other folks are up to and what value/benefit they get from training :)

    #6141
    Darin Prentice
    Darin Prentice
    Survivalist
    member4

    i would like to say i was trained by an instructor, but i wasnt. started at 12yrs old, spent 15 years looking into religion and martial arts. found a nice combo with zen Bhudism and Taoist beliefs. and another ten years trying to figure it out… .” the blue mountains are of themselves, blue mountains”….

    i tried tae kwon do …my buddys keep proclaiming how good it is, i find it too square of movements, and kinda predictable. for the life of me i cant move in a square pattern. but my friends do well in it. most of them like this art.

    jeet kune do.. with the philosophy and training books, his manuals and autobiography i spent several years practicing his workouts, using the weapons described, and keeping on my path. the idea of no wasted movement, no wasted breath intrigued me. that any movement and any pattern can change completly becoming un-predictable. focus on chi energy and the generation of multiplied power, manipulation of force, and transfer impact, im probably still alive because of this training.

    #1 } today i think tai chi is probly the best for non impact, well rounded moves, promote circulation, increase flexability, and mental strengthening. i dont work out hard so much since my heart attack, still have three blockages. we keep going. once you get a hold of this movement, from there chi just comes, but its much more than that….for non combatants, elderly, young, special needs… it adapts to the person.

    id like to just say that i have not seen war, nor served in the military, so im speaking as a peace lovin short hair canadian what just likes to protect himself and his family, concirned for his country, and neighbors…everyone should train in something. prepare, preserve, protect..

    Prepare, Preserve, Protect...

    #6150
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    The only formal training, if you could call it that, is from my friend who is a black belt in Kenpo. Mostly punching and kicking techniques, along with disarming an adversary who has a knife or gun.

    I’d LOVE to be able to do Krav Maga.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #6184
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Systema
    “Systema is a comprehensive survival and combat discipline which enables a practitioner to become effective in all aspects of modern combat.

    A Systema practitioner must learn to fight from any position in any situation. Working with, or fighting against vast variations of conventional and improvised weapons, standing or on the ground, defeating single or multiple attackers.

    Our unique training is specifically designed to entrench neuromuscular memory and to re-educate bio-mechanical awareness and bio-energetic potential, which is critical for neutralization of high intensity conflict.

    Our teaching methods and principals are identical to those used for training Spetsnaz (Russian Special Forces) units.” http://www.cqcia.com/WhatIs.htm Love it !

    #6251
    bushrat
    bushrat
    Survivalist
    member4

    Spent several years training in Tang Soo Do. Three years lost both my legs and haven’t be able to get back into anything yet. Still struggling. Any ideas on training from a wheelchair? Not sure which direction to go in. Appreciate your opinions.

    #6255
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    Bushrat, my good friend Erik runs this organisation, maybe of use/interest:

    http://www.not-me.org/

    Leopard, what do you like particularly about Systema?

    #6256
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6
    #6257
    bushrat
    bushrat
    Survivalist
    member4

    Thanks Toby. Not only interesting, but encouraging. I’ve bookmarked those websites and will be looking into them more.

    #6260
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Toby, I’ve spent one day training with Kalah instructors doing Anti Hi-jacking. Kalah is a lot like Krav Maga. I really learned valuable lessons. If you learn a movement and then practice it correctly over and over again – and THEN get attached by the instructors as close to real life as possible. You really do learn allot about yourself.

    I’ve only just started with Systema. Still doing the breathing exercises. The techniques learned gets practiced the whole day – getting in and out of my vehicle as fluent as possible. Standing up from the ground without using your hands. Breathing in through your nose and out through your mouth running up the stairs. Bumping my toe- breathing short busts instead of *&^^%ing.

    Being over 40 and becoming very old very quickly with an accident (that ruined my back) I felt vulnerable. You still need to be able to protect yourself. I learned about Systema And the most important lesson for me, If you really want something, it is possible ! To do movements slowly can be more of a workout you will ever suspect. Movements become more and more economical. You are using less energy. Students enjoy class because
    Systema is powerful, effective, but relaxed.

    A student got attacked by three armed robbers a few months ago. One died, one in hospital and one in jail.

    The best part of Systema for me would probably be the survival camps.

    #6695
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Toby,
    I trained in Krav Maga for a little while but with my work schedule it made it difficult to make class. That and the fact the only place at the time that taught it was 70 miles away. I would love to get back into it. The thing that I like the most about it is the movements are mostly based of gross motor skills. No complicated hand movements or fancy kicks that will get hurt trying to use them to defend yourself. I also like the idea of continuous combos that each delivered strike loads the next one. Very efficient fighting style.

    #11326
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    I have done some Tae kwa ndo when I was younger and then some Muay Thai. I believe proper self defense training and combatives make most sense for us survivalists though. I plan to do some Eskrima / Kali training in the Philippines next year.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #11340
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    I practice now tai chi  most instructors teach it like a dance, need to find a purist if you will to enable the  combat part of it … you will get your kicks from it. As all fighters know it is a difference of inches so technique is everything most people learn yang style it has a few draw back  that are taught to non members remember a few  things in all hand to hand 1) weapon always leads 2) economical motions, never allow a block to not turn into a strike 3) you can only be hard (strength)in one place at a time like your enemy never meet strength with strength  4) when doing the full routine mark your foot position your last step should be in same spot exactly. the family  in taiwan only teaches the 5th level  to  insiders. Like anything the best teachers are the ones who find you once you find the path and put the effort in.

    The best trained people are like trying to strike water very little resistance but as soon as you move back they occupy your space.
    . Any instructor who does not do a chi expenditure cool down should be avoided, the way to release is  much like  fluttering hand motions… if you do not spend the energy it can cause problems when you  finally generate it.

     

    #12043
    Profile photo of JohnSouth
    JohnSouth
    Survivalist
    member1

    Go to a MMA academy and spar a little, I think that will help.

    After you get taken down and dominated by a 6 month Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu white belt the confusion on what to do next will be eliminated.

    Better than training kung fu or Karate for 5 years, and then still get taken down by 6-12 month white belt.

    That 6-12 month white belt will often do the same thing to your instructor unless he also trains BJJ.

    The strength and conditioning is also invaluable, your cardio will be on another level from the average guy who trains martial arts or lifts weights or runs. Your pain tolerance will be well beyond the average person if you can come and train every day.

    Also lift weights and get strong, don’t settle for weakness.

    Muay Thai is a good counterpart to BJJ, you will learn to hit hard, take hits and deal with all kinds of attacks. Other than that not much out there that has not been over run by women, children and skinny PC nerds.

    Kali is a good idea for weapons if you carry baton or knife but the empty hand training is almost useless and in my area very little time is offered, the training is little contact and no conditioning.

    It is only effective because weapons are inherently effective and any small skill you have will amplify that.

    Those guys in the Philippines really fight each other, like MMA with weapons, that’s a whole other thing. If dog brothers style training is offered I’d do that if you enjoy pain.

    The closer to real fighting and resistance you can get the better.

     

    #12060
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Good topic. Krav Maga has been a good experience for me. Came to it in the military.

    #12062
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    I believe cardio is the most imortant part of any self defense. I don’t care what fighting style you use, if you get winded in 10 to 20 seconds your in trouble. The fatigue starts before the first punch ever gets thrown. When your adrenaline starts to pump at the first sign of danger your breathing and heart rate increase. It is the bodies natural instinct for fight or flight. If you have been around many street fights you know they don’t last more than about 15 to 20 seconds after the first punch gets thrown and both people are usually sucking wind when it’s over.

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