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  • #6401
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    These I found on youtube. Interesting to watch.

    ***********************************************

    and this one is just a trailer as it comes out april sixth.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #6614
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thanks Tweva, I like “After Armageddon” .

    #6807
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Yes Selco I like it more my self it seems to cover quite a bit and is more realistic.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #7209
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Thanks for posting these movies. ‘After Armageddon’ is a classic.

    #35043
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Mikhail Tolstykh
    or Chuck Norris

    Received widespread fame in October 2014 when a video of him ignoring an artillery strike landing only meters from him was uploaded on YouTube and gained over 800,000 views.

    sooo calm

    #35048
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    We need to team him up with that armed granny in Ukraine. They’ll make for an invincible force.

    #42357
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Very very old movie – Jock of the Bushveld – based on a true story in 1880’s. FitzPatrick’s adventures during this time of his life, when he was pioneering in the Bushveld, are vividly described in his book Jock of the Bushveld, which is generally accepted as a South African classic. Link : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agVBwkL7FVE

    In the early 1900’s he used to recount the adventures of his dog Jock (a Staffordshire Bullterrier cross), in the form of bedtime stories to his four children, Nugent, Alan, Oliver, and Cecily, to whom the book was dedicated. The book, which appeared in 1907 for the first time, was an immediate and overwhelming success, being reprinted four times in that year.

    FitzPatrick’s first wagon journey to Lourenço Marques (now Maputo) started on 8 May 1885. He was the least experienced of a party of transport riders, arranged by Hugh Lanion Hall, to transport supplies purchased at the Port. One of this group was Ted Sievewright, the owner of Jess, Jock’s mother.

    The Samarhole spruit or Ship Mountain Camp is a focal point of some of the major events in story of Jock. It was here that the group he was travelling with nearly lost their wagons and equipment in a self-inflicted veld fire. It was also here that Jess had her litter. She gave birth at the Samarhole campsite, under a big tree standing near the edge of the spruit.
    Her timing had been bad, as it happened to be on the same day that the party had decided to resume their journey to Lourenço Marques. While the wagons were being inspanned, Jess aggressively prevented any approach towards the party’s rifles resting against the trunk of the tree. It was soon discovered why Jess had been acting in such a peculiar manner. In the soft long grass beneath the tree, the cry of a puppy could be heard. Ted was sent for to entice Jess onto his wagon.

    She and her six puppies were given a special nest near the tailboard of Ted’s wagon. Of the six, 5 resembled their father, an imported dog, with only one looking like Jess. FitzPatrick was to take an interest in the runt because the other five had been booked by Ted’s friends. In Jock of the Bushveld, FitzPatrick tells the story of how this runt would eventually become the champion of the litter, Jock.

    #46260
    Profile photo of Corvus
    Corvus
    Survivalist
    member4

    Here’s a favorite: https://youtu.be/Hw7EX3Nned8

    #46266
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I had read the book but never saw the movie. Looks good.

    #46401
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    We finally watched “The Postman” last night. The theme was very satisfying, the ending was nice, but it was just too long and drawn out. I was disappointed, because despite the theme and ending, it is not one either of us would ever watch again, or recommend. But that’s just me. Your mileage may vary.

    I would LOVE to see a movie made of JJ Johnson’s “Cracking the Liberty Bell.” I had that in a file, in its entirety, but the file was corrupted, and I’ve only got about 3/4 of it left that was recoverable, and have never found anyone that could get me a complete copy again – even two of JJ’s former “sidekicks” from way back (JJ has either died or completely dropped himself off the map, apparently). What a loss (both the man, and his manuscript).

    #46421
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Last I heard he was in the Pahrump NV area doing TV.
    Probably a rumor though.

    #46429
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    No Whirlibird, no rumor. You’re correct. But he left there several years ago and “dropped out” very intentionally. He told an individual we both know that he’d maintain a particular email address if that person ever needed to get in touch with him, but that address is no longer valid. For him to have entirely lost contact with that individual would be much more than a little surprising unless something catastrophic happened, physically, mentally, legally, or safety-wise. The individual who is the last known person to have had contact with him believes it was most likely the safety issue. And now that individual (the bar keeper) is either deceased or severely disabled and effectively non-functional, so re-contact is not possible. Remember “Sierra Sue?” She and JJ had a falling out of sorts when she left the “Ranch,” and she also has no idea what happened to him now (she’s essentially fully retired and just trying to live one day to the next happily, and in peace). Regardless, what a great, great loss to the “community.” One of my prize possessions, even though it’s now available on YouTube, is a full recording I made of the Senate militia hearings – my first exposure to JJ. I was home sick that day (a rare occurrence) and just happened to check C-SPAN to see what was on. I literally caught the very beginning of the program before the hearing had actually begun, and decided for some reason to record it. What a great decision – because YouTube wasn’t invented for a long time after that. I was able to provide a copy to “Swampy” way back when (I’m sure you remember him). You can imagine how happy he was to have it, knowing what he thought of JJ. So YouTube or not, I’m kind of sentimental about having my own original recording of the full hearing.

    For quite a while after watching the hearing, I didn’t realize that the NON-stereotypical black militia leader at that hearing was the same person as the person that maintained a web site that pre-dated the “Ranch.” But when he announced the coming shut down of that earlier web site (mainly just excellent information on firearms – good education) and the coming start up of Sierra Times, I shortly thereafter realized that “James Johnson,” the black militia leader at the Senate hearing, was JJ at the “Ranch.” It was a neat sudden combination of good information that resulted in a subtle but significant course correction for me. I miss him greatly. (I’ve always wondered just what those Senators were privately thinking when they had a couple of wild-looking militia leaders at the table, but also a couple of them dressed nicely in suits, white shirts, and ties, with very neat grooming – and one of them was black!. That must have messed with their minds!!! Ooops! on the stereotypes, Senators! LOL!

    I happen to be a John Hartford fan (yes, I know probably no one else here has likely even heard of him, though most Americans, at least, know some of his music without realizing he wrote it). Anyway, in a song titled, “They’re gonna tear down the Grand Ol’ Opry,” Hartford laments the passing of some of the good stuff from the past. And one line near the end kind of says it all for so many things: “Another good thing has done gone on, done gone on.”

    In fact, since it’s new year’s eve, even though I don’t drink the “usual” for this celebration, perhaps part of another Hartford song seems in order as we raise a virtual glass together:

    Now here’s to them good ol’ boys.
    Cheer ‘em on, make a lot of noise!
    For this would be a sad old world,
    Without a lot of good ol’ boys.

    A lot of “good ol’ boys” have indeed “done gone on,” but there are still some left. I count it a privilege to be among some good ones (of both genders) here in the SHTF Forum. Thanks for who you are, what you do, and what you represent – all of you. May 2016 be as safe as possible for each of you, and may you look back a year from now and be glad you lived it, not just made it through.

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