Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 36 total)
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  • #43025
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    That’s incredible! You might have a record setting tree.

    #43044
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    The 3rd time’s the lucky charm! I found my back boundaries! It goes back 250-300′ further than I used to think (me having incorrectly thought an ancient stone wall must be the back boundary) and it extends a nice amount further on one side than I thought was the case too. That gives me a nice chunk of good quality woods I didn’t realize was mine. Much of my woods are soggy due to poor drainage and being at the base of the mountain but this additional area that I hadn’t realized was mine is on the rising slope and totally dry.

    To bring this back to a prepping slant, while I was wandering around back there I was thinking about where and how I might cache things should it come to that. Between rocks and roots digging a hole would be all but impossible in most of it. That said, I’m not convinced actually burying anything would be a good idea even if I could. Frost can go pretty deep here in the winter which would make anything buried totally inaccessible. My thinking is put sealed PVC pipes on the surface, cover with brown tarps, and then cover the tarp with pine needles or leaves depending upon location, and then branches or other debris on top. There are so many downed trees, old stumps, and large stones on the surface out there that a few additional lumps would not stick out in the least. Recording the GPS coordinates is good but I think best to have a secondary way of finding it again. That’s the hard part but I’d figure it out.

    #43045
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    You can use your pins or at least one of them and at least one other point to establish the position of your cache. It requires a good compass. At the cache take a reading for at least 2 fixed points. Record the Inverted course as well. Three is better though. Mark the pin really well so you can find it in any weather. To find your cache star at the pin or one of the other fixed points. Follow the Inverted compass reading. Take sightings on the 2 other points as you near the distance. When all three aline with the recorded headings, you are on your spot.

    #43046
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I’m thinking maybe I should do a practice run. Hide a couple things out there this autumn and then go find them in the spring. I just need to make sure I do it before hunting season.

    #43049
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    It’s common practice for hunters to use marking tape, reflective tacks and other easily seen marks to get them into the woods in the dark and find their stand. If you use any of these no one would question the purpose.

    #44380
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Just some trivia here. I was out in the woods again and visited that ancient yellow birch tree. I measured the circumference about waist height. It was 10’5″.

    #44381
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    That’s a big tree, with 3.3′ diameter. How tall do you think it is?

    “Growth is moderately slow, and maturity is reached in 120 to 150 years. It is not uncommon to find yellow birch trees over 300 years old. The largest yellow birch on record is 54 inches in diameter at breast height and 90 feet high, with a 6%-foot crown diameter.” http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/usda/amwood/221birch.pdf

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 9 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
    • This reply was modified 5 years, 9 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
    #44385
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I’m not good at guessing heights but maybe 60′. It is as wide as it is tall which means it achieved much of its growth when that section of woods was clear. There are some white pines nearby that are taller.

    #44433
    Profile photo of Realist
    Realist
    Prepper
    member2

    Hey I wanted to throw in my 2 cents. Our neighbor wanted to do some logging in our area but needed access across our property. They put in three bridges and established a good road through out property so it can be used in the event of fire. At to the forester you might want to contact you local ag extension who may be able to help you. If nothing else you might check with the local farm bureau. There is a formula for each area as to how many trees per acre should be grown. When they exceed this then you have the potential for more intense fires.which we have had in my area. Properly thinned and managed you will have more wildlife which will be a benefit.

    #44436
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I did talk with the County Agent and decided against letting anyone log on my property. You must live out West. Here in the soggy East you could take a blow torch to my woods and not get a forest fire going.

    #44438
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB
    While a forest fire would be rare, the productivity of the wood lot can be improved by thinning & culling. It’s just a big garden. Removing weak, poorly formed and undesirable species will enhance the growth of the more desirable trees. Just like in a garden, let the best trees propagate.

    #44439
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    74, you are correct but I don’t know how to go about that. Loggers are just going to want the best trees. Their objective wouldn’t be the longer term health of my woods but rather their shorter term profits.

    #44442
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    Well it’s not very hard to do. Take out the funky crooked trees, trees with multiple trunks and big Ys. Thin out the thickets of younger trees to allow more light and space around individual trees.

    Leave the straight well formed trees with healthy crowns. Take out trees with damaged unhealthy crowns and dead wood hanging in the air. Remove the mature trees that have stopped growing. The crowns will be filled with dead limbs. If there are trees without a lot of practical use remove those.

    A 4×4 truck can pull out logs. A 1/2″or 3/8″ steel cable walked onto the woods and fastened to the log will allow pulling tree length logs out without cutting a path for the truck. A stout winch can be a great aid as well.

    Never pull a log out by rolling out on loose cable and jerking the slack. Make sure the butt end won’t hang up on a stump, rock or tree. Pull slow and easy. Do not work in the woods alone!

    #44456
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    74, you have more energy than me I think. Had I owned this property back in my 20’s & 30’s I might have taken on the challenge, but having passed 60, not so likely anymore. My woods will sit as is until a younger person comes along that wants to do it. I don’t have any old logging roads in my woods that I can get to from my yard anyway. My property and a couple others were part of a much larger property prior to being subdivided in the mid to late 70’s, and logging access to the woods would have been off of one of the other properties.

    #44463
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    Oh don’t get me wrong, logging a big lot is more work then I want to do. When I said it wasn’t hard I was referencing the intellectual part of the job. Logging is hard work and dangerous.

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