Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 30 total)
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  • #6539
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    Just a small reminder for anyone who suffers the same problem I do.

    My foot is prone to twisting out from under me at times if I am not careful, often resulting in a strained ankle for a few days. For anyone who has a similar problem a pair of shoes or boots that will hold the ankles secure and not allowing them to flex too much can save a lot of trouble and pain, especially when trying to stay alive.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

    #6545
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Well I’m sorta with Gypsy. I wear what I can afford to wear for what I am doing.

    Being older, with foot injuries/surgeries in the past it is often painful to break in a pair of shoes or boots no matter what they cost, so they are comfortable for me. I get my sister to wear new ones for me (same size) to break them in, but usually I take the ones I love to a shoemaker and have them repaired/resoled. Like Elijah I also need ankle support when I am doing active things (detached tendon in one ankle)

    If I find a good used, broken in pair of footwear in my size, for what I need, I will certainly buy them to have spares.

    I like Timberland and Keens for quality and comfort generally speaking.

    #6564
    vettom
    vettom
    Survivalist
    member2

    Thanks Gypsy for a older dude who may not be built as tough from personal experience if your shoes/boots don’t fit well are not broken in good you can get blisters or something else that will impede your progress. Something I learned long ago in scouts hiking long distances. Besides taking care of your own feet is of the first order. We don’t have that cold here thanks

    #6573
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Try the UA tactical boots , strong ankle support , and comfort , another thing you could try , is get some webbing with a quick release buckle , then once your boot is on , put it on and cinch it down around the ankle . I have not done this , but worked with a guy that did it on one foot ….he said it gave the extra support he needed , when he needed it .

    #6582
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Elijah B – My foot is prone to twisting out from under me at times if I am not careful, often resulting in a strained ankle for a few days –
    I used to do a lot of horse riding that caused my tendons to stretch, resulting in weaker ankles. Got this advice from a vet. Exercise your ankles and strengthen them by standing on a step about a brick’s height. Stand on it with the balls of your feet so your heels touch the ground. Using your ankles, lift your own weight repeatedly.
    Walking up mountains …with proper boots also helped.

    #6584
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Leopard – that exercise will also get rid of plantar faciatus, i.e. heel pain, that many are told they need to buuy all sorts of contraptions to ‘cure’…or have surgery. I was one of those people. It disappeared after about 10 days doing that – had the pain for almost a year.

    #8971
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Just a little tip for quickly breaking in new leather boots. Put the boots on and jump in the shower for 10-15 minutes. Get them good and wet inside and out. Wear them until they are dry. The water will soften the leather making them more comfortable on your feet and allowing the leather to stretch more easily. When they are dry they will be perfectly molded to your foot. My favorite boots are my Justin lace up work boots. Good ankle support, comfortable, tough, and not overly expensive. Oh almost forgot, make sure to put a leather conditioner or snow seal on them after they dry. They will last longer that way.

    #9014
    Profile photo of lci115lewis
    lci115lewis
    Survivalist
    member3

    I discovered that trick by accident at a Civil War re-enactment, we had to walk through a creek as we “retreated early in one of the battles, did not have a chance to get my brogans off for about 6 hours after that, so they had dried nicely. Next morning I noticed they were a LOT more comfortable, and this was a pair of shoes I had been wearing at least 1 full weekend a month for the previous 3 years. Since then I have soaked all of my leather re-enacting footwear and dried them on my feet, since it is extremely hard to find my correct size in reproduction footwear (so far all I have found is custom made soft leather shoes, nothing suitable for longer marches and rough use). I just get the smallest size that come close to the width of my foot and stretch them, for everyday wear I have been using a cheap pair of side zip boots, the Brazos side zips that Academy sports carries in my size(11 EEEE US size, actually my foot length is a 10.5 and off the chart in standard widths, but that is close enough to be comfortable) for $30, I get about 6 months out of them before my feet start to hurt from the wear on the soles. I got about a year out of a $120 pair of Magnum boots that were basically the same style, but for the same money I can get 4 pairs that will last me 2 years instead of 1 pair that lasts 1 year.

    I do replace the laces with paracord, otherwise I snap at least 1 lace after about 4 months, my current laces have been moved to their 3rd pair of boots now with no real signs of wear after 14 months.

    Rob

    #9079
    Profile photo of Kiwi25
    Kiwi25
    Survivalist
    member3

    I select my current boots on cost. Cheap or free… :-). So I have some advice on fixing up “throw out boots”.

    My current walking boots are Hi Tec hikers that I bought at Vinnies ( St Vincent de Paul ) for $1. The shop lady suggested that they were so bad they shouldn’t sell them.. but I said I was happy to pay $1. ( It’s a charity.. and I’m big hearted…)
    They were well worn ( broken in ) and the soles were lifting at the front.. but had plenty of life in the tread and sides. They fit me well.. so I bought some Urethane Glue .. based on internet search.. called Freesole.

    http://www.amazon.com/Freesole-Urethane-Formula-Repair-McNett/product-reviews/B000XRD8X6/ref=dp_top_cm_cr_acr_txt?showViewpoints=1

    These are Amazon reviews and my experience supports them. This is GOOD STUFF.. it works. I glued the soles and the Rand ( the bit of sole over the toe) and have been using them for several years now. I had to repair one of the lace attachments with a copper split rivet.. another handy thing to have.
    My son was given a pair of Wolverine brand hunting boots which had a loose sole too. Same story. Fixed with the same tube ( and I have saved a pair of beach sandals too .. strap pulled out). The Wolverine boots are Goretex and are designed for forest hunting . Light and flexible. Good if you need to move quickly and quietly.

    At one point in SHTF your life may depend on your boots.. so maybe have the best. At another point .. you may not be able to get any boots.. to replace your worn ones… so having cheap spares, or different kinds of boots.. may be what you need.

    #18117
    Profile photo of Greywolf1
    Greywolf1
    Survivalist
    member1

    Any Salomon boots.
    Men’s Quest 4D GTX for rugged terrain.
    Men’s XA Pro 3D Mid LTR GTX for over-the-road – these are the best shoes I’ve ever owned.

    #18326
    Profile photo of WhiteKnight
    WhiteKnight
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    For winter/ cold days I have: Rocky Hunting boots. These boots keep my feet warm regardless of temperature, windchill, or water. They are waterproofed halfway down and water resistant all the way up. They’re heavy, but I absolutely love them. These are pretty much the same pair, not sure if they make mine anymore.

    I was so impressed with them I am looking at their Rocky SSV’s for my all around boot. Might get them, might not.

    #18342
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Whatever is comfortable and that you can keep in repair . I have learned that there is no one shoe or boot , that is compatible with all situations , but my suggestion is to avoid heavy footwear , and soles that are too thick and do not flex easily .

    #19145
    Profile photo of Glockerman
    Glockerman
    Survivalist
    member2

    I’m in agreement with elijah. I’d prefer high-top boots to help secure the ankle. You may not be able to run as fast in them, but you won’t be running at all with a twisted/sprained ankle.

    #21093
    Profile photo of PhilB
    PhilB
    Survivalist
    member1

    I wear dress shoes at work so I keep a broke in pair of hiking boots in my car should I need to get home by hoofing it.
    Also I plan to get some Moleskin http://www.amazon.com/Adventure-Medical-Kits-Blister-Medic/dp/B001697F5C/ref=pd_sim_sg_6?ie=UTF8&refRID=0S9Q0EP1HZZ9WX5K53XT just in case I’m starting to get blisters. I don’t hike enough to insure I wouldn’t get blisters on a long hike. Nothing worst than getting blisters while hiking.
    Phil

    #21926
    Profile photo of colin9h2
    colin9h2
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Anything is better than nothing OP. You’re feet will make or break you when your on the move. The only thing I can tell you is to take note of the terrain you live in and the weather, then find the best pair of kickers in your budget. You don’t have to drop a whole paycheck on some tacti-cool boots; if you aren’t planning on going in to combat, you don’t need combat boots. I’m an infantryman by trade, so I know a thing or two when it comes to foot care. There are different kicks for different situations man, keep that in mind. I personally would wear my duty boots when I’m out and about, because my feet are used to them and I can kick a mean door with em. But when I’m not expecting any trouble, I’ll be wearing some sneakers no doubt. Just because SHTF, doesn’t mean I can’t wear my Nikes. Aint no one gonna take my Nikes haha.

    Another thing is don’t buy footwear based on the premises that its waterproof or not. Gore-Tex and the like is great for light rain and walking through puddles, but if you get caught in a heavy storm or have to cross a body of water, its not gonna matter. The best thing is to find something that will dry quickly so you can switch your socks and charlie mike. It would behoove you to invest in a decent amount of foot powder and anti fungal spray too. When I was out for last AT, no one thought to bring foot powder and a lot of the guys suffered for it. The Gold Bond blue bottle works wonders for absorbing moisture and keeping your feet dry, which above ALL is the most important thing for your feet. Take care of your feet and they will take care of you OP, good luck!

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