Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 30 total)
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  • #6398
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    What kind of footwear you have ready for the time when SHTF, or what you would like to have?
    Do you store something special for that moment, or you gonna have your usual boots (for example)?

    Do you have more footwear for different scenarios there?

    It might look like not so important question, but in reality it sucks when you have not proper footwear when SHTF, for example in urban fighting people (me too) realized that traditional military boots are not so usable.

    #6407
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    My boots are two kinds , for moving around , when I think that I may have to run a lot , I have UA tactical side zip boots ( not to be confused with the Valsets that are apparently junk ) , they are light as a feather , with a tread that grips well , even on ice and snow , good ankle support and most comfortable I have ever owned . TYhen for day to day , I have a pair of Sketchers work boots , they are extremely comfortable , but not as much as the UA boots , but they are tougher , I could run in them , but being work boots , would prefer not to have to , because you do notice the weight .

    #6408
    flatlander
    flatlander
    Survivalist
    member2

    I got a pair of Merrel Chameleons that have a stiff sole and allows me to walk home if necessary. My goal is to blend in with people around me and not stand out with military or police influenced equipment.

    #6410
    Ghost
    Ghost
    Survivalist
    member3

    I did read Selco’s artical about footwear but I’ll be honest I favour boots, I’m not a common size (UK12) and tend to wear out trainers quite quickly, I do wear trainers for daily wear but for bushcraft and definately if TSHTF I have to go with boots because of durability.

    Although shoe sizes have increased the average being a 9 I would worry about resupply/ repair/ replacements in a SHTF scenario.

    If at first you don't succeed, excessive force is usually the answer.

    #6411
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    I keep several pairs of good broken in hiking boots.

    One pair lives in the back of my truck, and has a number of hikes/hunts to their credit.

    I also keep a pair of muck boots on hand for those times when mud, snow or concrete would ruin a pair of leather boots.

    Back when I lived in a real city, I kept several pairs of the softer soled “Magnum” boots around. Quieter and softer than traditional hiking boots, they also wore out faster in those conditions.

    Much depends on where you are, what you’re doing as to what you’ll need.

    #6413
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Hiking/ backpacking boots for me, wear them everyday. They have to be high end boots and not some look like they are something they not stuff.

    #6422
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    http://www.capeunionmart.co.za/right-hiking-sock I love my Falke socks. The best socks I’ve ever had
    Got some leather boots. Black New Balance Trail shoe’s to run with. http://newbalance.co.za/new_balance_products_women_trail_outdoor.php
    Enjoy the HiTec Magnum boots the most. http://www.hi-tecdirect.co.za/product.php?prdId=329 In summer I feel a bit safer wearing them – snakes

    #6443
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Speaking of socks , Sealskinz are pricy , but work , they are triple layer , keep your feet warm and dry and are 100% waterproof ….so even if your boots are not waterproof , your feet will be fine .

    #6465
    Darin Prentice
    Darin Prentice
    Survivalist
    member4

    my good old standby’s are a pair of jungle combat boots, and a pair of desert issue combats. regular maint, waterproofing and doing the laces. insoles with heat shield. these are usualy with my bug out bag.

    firemens boots i wear for working in the bush, comfortable, light, durable. but cant realy run or climb in them and traction kinda sucks unless you go spikes then they are clumsy.
    i stick with full cotton socks with boot booty’s,

    dont have a link but i been looking at certain fungai that grows a leather skin, added with cedar bark that makes a tough shoe. cordage to lace it together. rough alternative.

    Prepare, Preserve, Protect...

    #6466
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    In all honesty this household is gonna use what ever is the most comfortable at the time. They way we are thinking is these are all grand shoes and boots. But when it comes down to it, where on earth are we gonna get them again?
    We will do with what we have, it works. I don’t actually want my feet pampered, as I could be using cow or seal hide the next year for shoes and such. Yes big change in foot wear it would be for a 300.00 pair of shoes!

    my grandfather reminded me about the fact that in ww2 they even at some points tooks the boots off the dead, so soldiers had footwear.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #6470
    Darin Prentice
    Darin Prentice
    Survivalist
    member4

    i agree Gypsy, up until four years ago {aside from my boots from working in the tarsands} my personal shoes were runners. and the kids had …crocs. my minset was that when the moment come, i had what i had and i gotta do with what i got. i found a guy, ex combat engineer with surplus. great deals and he lives just down the highway from me in alberta. myself,the wife, and kids got the basics now. garage sales, kijiji, second hand stores, church bazaar, salvation army…good sources cheap prices or free.

    Prepare, Preserve, Protect...

    #6471
    vettom
    vettom
    Survivalist
    member2

    I got some Merrels, for everyday and New Balance if I have to bug to the AO from my office then I should be able. The other pair is a Matterhorn with steel toes I like a lot for cold weather, wet etc. I will probably add a lighter Merrel boot also to my line up. Shoes are like guns, IMHO, you need very good and well built. If your feet take you out of action due to fatigue, blisters, shoes fall apart etc, you are not preparing yourself properly. Not saying spend a fortune, but good shoes/boots are exactly that. If you got to get someplace and your shoes can’t handle the journey, U B screwed, IMHO.

    #6473
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Women’s to Men’s Shoe Size Conversion
    When converting women’s shoe sizes to men’s shoe sizes you need to size down two whole sizes.
    For example, a woman’s shoe size 10 is a men’s shoe size 8

    Just thought I would add this for future reference for some.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #6479
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Dont get me wrong Vettom. I own a pair of military grade bunny boots, I work with sled dogs, in – 40 windchill factors.
    Kids have snowmobile boots rated -20. I own work boots and rubber boots and sneakers. None of which are high priced. But in good weather I can climb a cliff face in bare feet or moccasins.I walk bare foot most times from spring to fall. Yes I guess I was built rough.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #6515
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    I do a lot of minimal and ultralightweight backpacking so Im a bit of a “gear queer” (or have been when I was first getting all the gear together).

    There are great light waterproof hiking shoes available right now. I had the Salomon 4D Cosmic GTX for over three years and really loved them.
    I went on all sort of mountains with them, extensive hiking trips and so on. They are also OK in most temperatures.

    A great compromise between sneakers and hiking boots and would be what I would pick for urban survival.

    For more heavy duty hiking and mountaineering I use Lowa Tibet boots. They are heavy but pretty hard to destroy. Some people hike with them for over 10 years.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

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