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  • #8889
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    http://www.vintagesaws.com/library/primer/sharp.html

    This link will take you to Vintagesaws.com. The post is well writen and instructions are on the money for obtaining great results.

    #8903
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Thanks for sharing this. I plan to set up a small wood workshop in the coming weeks and Im sure this will come in quite handy. Do you work with wood?

    A friend of mine who does custom furniture recommended me to simply get one of these “shark tooth” hand saws to get started.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #8907
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Jay,
    At one time I was a professional woodworker, and I have made or built something in most categories from 50′ boats to small custom boxes. I have done some rough work like building bent wood fencing, some timber framing and house construction.

    Back in the day I would sharpen all of my saws using the same methods shown on vintagesaws. I still have my saw sets. (& most of my other tools). I have a saw set for large 2 man saws and instruction how to shape and set the rakers somewhere.

    #8917
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    That’s awesome. I cant wait until I do more physical work instead of hammering away on a keyboard in front of a screen!

    What would you recommend are the essentials for a small wood workshop I should get? I plan to build some cupboards for the kitchen as my first little project.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #8931
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Jay,
    A quality table saw that has an equally high quality fence is the most basic starting point. Depending on the lumber you buy determines if you need a planner. If you buy a finished product that can be sanded you can will get by without. Rough lumber requires dimensional milling to provide uniformity and a surface smooth enough to sand. (of course this can all be done by hand if you have the right tools and energy).

    Band saw, use it to cut everything you don’t cut on the table saw.
    A workbench that will not move, vibrate, jiggle or other wise make it hard to use when you need control.
    A high quality bench vise. Not a mechanic or machinist vise.

    Smoothing plane
    Low angle block plane
    Tri-square
    Bevel
    Tape measure
    Good back saw
    Chisels as needed, & sharpening stone
    Drill
    Sharp drill bits, forstner bits for blind holes
    Sharp pencil, no dull pencils, fat lines make errors.

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