Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #6571
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Started this under a new topic and not under Ring of Fire…well, because volcanoes and earthquakes are just part of the natural calamaties that are increasingly ocurring around the world.

    Many of the things that people of the preparadness mindset ‘prepare’ for seem to be geared mostly (not all) for the results of man-made/man-caused events with maybe concern for solar flares causing EMP or maybe earthquakes. What concerns me even is the increasing speed of nature based catastrophies in the last 10 years. Mother Nature has been sending some very strong messages with greater and greater frequency. If you believe everything happens for a reason, as I do…you begin to investigate and determine for yourself what those reasons are!

    My personal conclusions after lots of thinking, reading and studying are the basis of why I do not expect to be able to utilize solar power for any great length of time. As I use the benefits now, I also try to prepare for a time when I can not benefit from it. This also plays in to where I have relocated and other preparations I am trying to make, including the amount of provisions of stored food and experimenting with different gardening scenarios. It is why I do not slow down as I used to in cutting and seasoning wood when I used to traditionally do it. Heating with wood, I now longer feel I can count on only needing it 5 months out of the year.

    As far as the use of solar, gardening methods and food storage provisions I think the preparadness community as a whole does not think enough about how what Mother Nature seems to be up to may affect their plans.

    For instance, we have already had a few years recently where we had very unusual, not normal spring and summer growing seasons. One year in the early 2000’s people in large parts of the country could not get their produce to ripen because temperatures cooled and the sun hide for long weeks behind the clouds.

    Having read, for a small instance, about the ‘Year Without Summer’, I can very well believe we can expect this to happen again. Especially in light of all of the volcanic and earthquake activity going on around the world. Not just in the states. We, earth, is like a closed system. What happens in one part of the world in nature can often also severely impact people in another part of the world. Of all the things you have presented before you to choose to read, I hope a few of you will read this Wikipedia about the ‘Year Without Summer’ (click here) in 1816 that actually ocurred,scientists believe was the result of large volcanic activity. It is chilling isn’t it.

    Then we have the changes in the magnetic field of the earth to consider….what does that potentially hold in storef or us? If there is an even small pole shift? Imagine a teacup full of water. imagine the teacup is an ocean or large body of water. Simply twitch the handle of the teacup. Watch the water slosh side to side and up/over the side of the cup. Is that anything that concerns you? Does it have bearing on what elevation you choose to live? Or, is this a far-fetched, unlikely scenario?

    I am not writing to argue with any one’s beliefs on the subject. I simply wonder if I am the only one that thinks of these things and allows it to impact their preparedness goals.

    #6583
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Your by no means the only one that believes the earth will impact our lives through change. The news media has everyone fixated on one element of change. Most people have bought in to the idea of slow change through millions and billions of years. It doesn’t always happen that way and some events effect the totality of the earth.

    This won’t happen again; someone said that. The grand canyon was formed “rapidly” by evacuating water from a large inland sea. The geological community doesn’t know when it happened. A lot of geological evidence proves this so it can be looked up. I’m not a fast enough typist to be bothered with all the details. However all the water flooded somewhere else, and the floor of the sea rose so the rim of the canyon (which was the bottom of the sea) is higher than everything around it, The point being that natural events like volcanoes, earthquakes, mud slides & tsunamis, and unexpected other things can happen fast.

    #6588
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Well 1974t150v – a big thank you for your post. Even friends who ‘prepare’ think I am absolutely crazy for even thinking about this, much less acting on it as I think it might help.

    I like to read the extinction protocol blog of Alvin Conway because it is the best compilation of nature related events I have found. Love his book ‘Hazard’ – very interesting. Just ordered his Utopia.

    This past winter was so unusually cold and long here – on top of previous odd weather patterns for the ‘norm’ here…and this ‘spring’ is shaping up to be just as odd. It’s all the volcanic ash at the moment going up in the air; or that may be added that I am watching.

    You could not pay me to live near a large body of water or a low-lying area. One of the reasons I worked so hard when younger to do anything to get out of where I was. I remember being in Bermuda as it was announced that a hurricane was expected to ‘possibly’ pass over the island. Looked around. Remembered how far out to sea, and how low above sea level it was and..got on a plane. Friends I was traveling with thought me nuts. Guess it’s best described as a long-standing, very squidgy feeling in my gut about sudden, massive changes in the sea levels. May not be rational but haven’t been able to shake it. Like being surrounded by mountains – squidgy feeling dissipates here.

    #6593
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Geologically someplace on the northern shield or Madagascar should be the safest. They are original rock formations from 4 billion years ago. just sayin

    #6594
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Whelp, thanks so much for cheering me up…not! Hahaha!

    #6602
    Darin Prentice
    Darin Prentice
    Survivalist
    member4

    as depresing as it sounds…you actualy cheered me up Tweva.
    i mean ya….holy crap when i was in school the big thing was that we would never see a major event again in our life. like you say though, looking at old glacier documentary’s and seeing a alien landscape today. due to everything you speak of.
    thaught…what do you think.
    if a person had a nice tight secure valley, and planted oxygen producing plants,{theres one that produces10x more oxygen than a tree, 100x faster}, also having two creeks and a river consider airating for humidity level,and planting water plants with benefits, select log standing dead fall, nurture local bogs and swamps promote gasses, with the ideal to create the sustainable eco environment……
    pretty far fetched but im dreaming of a world west of wonder…

    Prepare, Preserve, Protect...

    #6603
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    The year without a summer..

    From what I understand, it was a combination of the effects of the little ice age and Mount something-or-other blowing up in the south pacific…

    Europe was going through a warming period, population expansion, etc, when the little ice age slammed the door somewhere in the 12th century. This lasted until about 1850 or so. Mount whatsis blew up in 1815. A year later when the particulates had spread worldwide, they reflected enough sunlight to cause the year without a summer…

    I don’t buy into the whole “global warming” line of excrement. Back in the 1970’s, it was HERE COMES THE NEW ICE AGE!!! Then it was global warming. Now that the data doesn’t support that line of hogwash, they’ve come up with “climate change”…

    Well, DUH!! The earth is a dynamic system. It is ALWAYS changing, constantly. Folks live 10 feet from the ocean in hurricane alley, then crab and cry when a hurricane flattens their house. Same type of folks live ON the San Andreas Fault, then crab when an earthquake flattens their house. What’s that? You didn’t know living in Kansas put you at risk for tornadoes? You didn’t know wave action erodes shoreline and now your 200 year old saltbox house that used to be 400 yards from the ocean is now going to fall into it?

    The only constant is change. That, and the evil of men.

    The same type of goons who ginned up this ‘climate change’ hogwash are the same ones who are dealing in “carbon credits”, which is just a shakedown of the 1st world by the 3rd world. You want to keep making stuff, but you’ve got to meet the new ‘carbon emissions’ standards… well, that’s going to cost hundreds of millions in retrofitting! How can we afford that?!? Hold on there, cowboy! Here comes Al Gore and George Soros to save the day! Just give us a couple million for your ‘carbon credit’ and you can buy this “Get out of jail FREE!” card that will let you continue to crank out carbon like nothing has changed…

    It’s a worldwide scam dreamed up by evil men for the purpose of extorting money out of industrialized nations…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #6606
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Malgus! Yes! ‘ The earth is a dynamic system. It is ALWAYS changing, constantly.’ But why don’t people get that – and then take that in to account in their preparations? My interest in this is because I grow lots of stuff to feed myself and my livestock. You don’t have sun? Screwed. I can see if one or more of the very active volcanoes blow and spew stuff in the atmosphere – even if there aren’t the cold temperatures…it can change and affect the weather in mr growing area. I don’t buy into the ‘Climate Change’, ‘Ice Age Coming’ either…earth is constantly changing whatever you want to call it. But I can’t disregard the effects of the changes that seem very likely in the not distant future. I don’t know why volcanoes blow up or earthquakes happen – well I do – but I mean what causes them to happen when they do.

    Geez you aren’t a fan of the man that invented the internet?Imagine.

    #6637
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Back in the 70’s I was a geography major with quite a bit of earth science. One of my professors talked about the effort by some academics trying to prove global climate change through models. Said it couldn’t be done because there was no way to know or measure the variables and combination of events occuring. So far they proved the climate models are wrong. As one astrophysicist recently said about his model as voyager left the solar system and the model proved all wrong ” We had know idea this is what we would find”

    #6753
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    tweva, I like your thinking. You are thinking outside the box and trying to give yourself more options if things don’t proceed as anticipated. I think options are the key to prepping, so if one prep goes pear-shaped there can be another way to turn.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

    #7128
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    I lived mainly in Asia and Europe in the last 10 years and had to witness a lot of weird changes. Summers that are not summers anymore, winters that are not winters, flooding, drought and hurricanes or even tornados where they haven’t been before.

    Unfortunately the climate is one of the major unknown factors in the equation. Just a small change can literally make huge global waves. What happens to El Nino is just one example.

    There are actually quite a couple of good studies for a lot of regions out there that try to predict the impact of climate change. I know my future depends on water, because we have a long dry season here where I live and monsoon / rainy season the other half of the year.

    I think so many people are ignorant of the changes because they lost touch with nature and the environment.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #7129
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    Here in Newfoundland I’ve found over the last few years that our seasons are becoming more and more intense. Summers are getting warmer and much more dry at times, and our winters have much more snow and more bitter temperatures.

    That being said, if it continues it’ll really have an effect on my plans/preps. Can’t really go into detail because I haven’t really sat down and thought about what I would have to do differently yet.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #7134
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    I think we just have to prepare for everything a bit more extreme and we can not expect that the weather will be like it has been before. We expect the first rain after the dry season in mid April. I prepare for end of June now.

    It is a pity that the weather which has been pretty reliable for many centuries becomes so unstable now. One less factor to rely on, one more factor to be prepared for.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #7216
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    I think the novel and movie The Postman was what our society will become if we go back to the long winter of medieval times. Its not survivable for millions of people adapted to consumer civilization.

    #7243
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    As Mr Red said, yeah newfoundlands weather has been kinda topsy turvy the past few years. This winter strained the Newfoundland hydro to its peak over 30 000 at one point went with out power in the coldest of our winter. schools closed and businesses as well. Now it wasn’t for wks it came and went in patches for hours on end for three or four days..
    And where I am had its hottest summer this past summer in a unknown time. So yeah preps change it seems just like the weather. Here prepping is almost a way of life. Newfoundland is know for that to a certan point, but now we have to step it up.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

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