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  • #44990
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Wood ash can be used in many ways taking advantage of it’s chemical properties. I hadn’t been producing ash in any volume worth speaking of for a long time, but now we are heating with a wood stove and a garden in the back, I have a good use and a place to use it. The linked article is about the benefits of wood ash in the garden. http://extension.oregonstate.edu/gardening/wood-ash-can-be-useful-yard-if-used-caution

    • This topic was modified 3 years, 11 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
    #45024
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I generate a lot of wood ash through the winter being we heat the front half of the house with a wood stove. I spread it across the garden during the winter and what doesn’t wash in when the snow melts gets rototilled in in the Spring. It is a very large garden (75X170′) and so there is plenty of space to spread it around.

    #45053
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I didn’t know that it was used for the garden. I will use it this winter.

    #45054
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    Wood ash and chicken poop sure made the tomatoes grow in a garden I once had. I heard a nutritionist on the radio point out that one of the great “contributors” to the declining strength and vigor of us moderns, as compared to our pioneering ancestors, is the lack of mineral in our modern diet.

    Nowadays, industrial farming is done by spreading just enough nutrients (e.g., ammonia) to “goose” the plants into growing large, not necessarily nutritious, but profitable. A generation or two back, when many people heated with wood, they put their ashes on the garden plot, and got the benefit of dietary minerals that many of us would have to buy in supplement pill form. Spreading wood ashes on the garden makes sense to me.

    For those where it is available, alfalfa meal, pellets, or cubes, tilled into the soil, can add minerals as well.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #45056
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Use ash to make lye soap.
    Robin

    #45070
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Wood ash is used for ceramic glazes as well. http://pottery.about.com/od/glazeatmosphere/tp/ashrec.htm
    Presumably someone will need new pottery at some point.

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