Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #51370
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Sorry for the ramblings in advance.

    Having spent an amazing amount of time this year playing in the snow, I can’t help but laugh at those that plan to head for the hills and forage and hunt in a SHTF situation.

    The sheer amount of energy and time involved is beyond the comprehension of many.

    The toll it takes on gear and people is something that most don’t consider. How many calories does one need to be active? Where are you going to find them?
    Is your gear going to hold up when the temperature is below 0 for weeks and you’re carrying extra junk?

    A recent conversation with an acquaintance regarding his “group” escaping the city and setting up in the sticks reaffirmed that most people don’t have a clue.

    But I hunt there every year!
    You may hunt there, but you don’t live there year round. You may be able to drop an elk or deer provided they aren’t run into the deep dark, you can’t grow squat in the good season let alone when there’s feet upon feet of snow on everything.
    You can’t pack a winter’s worth of food along.
    Skip the fantasy of running off to the hills.

    Squirrel. ADD moment.

    I had the opportunity to watch some people try and light some propane stoves recently. Let’s just say I won’t be giving up my liquid fuel stoves anytime soon.

    With that gear thought, a recent video by Clint Smith comes to mind. While a sales pitch for an upcoming winter class, he makes a very valid point about rifles in extreme conditions.

    #51377
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Anything over 10k feet I’m sitting in the hot tub for a week before I do anything. Aclimatizing.

    #51378
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Good points , thats why historically , for a very long time , there were extremely few winter offensives . Nothing moves well , not machines , animals , or people . below zero lubricants . Your gun could freeze up and become inoperable until it gets warmed up . This was a serious problem for the Germans on the eastern front . They had a chronic shortage of cold weather lubricants , so rifle bolts , and even artillery would jam up at inopportune moments , if efforts were not made to keep them covered or warmed in some way . How to improvise lubricants could be useful . The Russians in WW2 mixed gun oil with diesel fuel , more because of shortages , but it worked . Then there is moving around , you dont know whats underneath that snow , or how deep it REALLY is in places , overall, it just plain sucks ! We had two blizzards here in Maine , between the two of them it dumped 4-5 feet of snow . Even with infrastructure geared to this climate , it was a challenge for them to keep the streets clear , lots open , etc . it just doesn’t go away on its own , you have to find a place to get rid of it . This is with everything up and running . I agree with WB’s assessment of severe conditions in a SHTF situation . In my mind , even if you were lucky enough to have an off grid cabin in a remote area , if you dont have enough wood chopped in advance before the snow hits , you are going to have a hard time of it .

    #51379
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I would add that there is a vast difference between going from your heated house to a heated vehicle to a heated office or store and being outside all day in the cold. I would also add that there’s cold and then there’s COLD. In COLD you will discover how quickly your fingers lose dexterity if you have to take your gloves off for a moment to do something. Most of the winter clothes you see in the stores are made to look like they are made for the COLD more than they are made to actually be outside for a long time.

    Something I learned along the way that many don’t know is that lobster claw gloves are the best way to keep your fingers warm. These are gloves where 2 fingers go in together, plus the thumb has its own space. The fingers help warm each other and you still maintain some grabbing ability much better than you have with mittens.

    Movement in deep snow on snowshoes is exhausting, especially if you are the one breaking the trail or going uphill. Without snowshoes it is very difficult to move at all. Movement in deep snow burns a huge amount of calories.

    Wet feet can prove to be a death sentence given how difficult it will be to walk once they go numb, and they will go numb very quickly.

    Meanwhile I’ve been in shorts for the past 4 days given its been getting up over 50 every day. We had 2 severe winters in a row followed by 2 mild winters in a row and now we have what is a very odd winter. Since Nov. we’ve been cycling back and forth between cold and warm, snowy and dry. The sugaring season is going gangbusters though. If it keeps up they’ll have a record year.

    #51380
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Right now (0930MST) it’s 2 outside.
    It was -16 a couple of mornings I came into work.

    In the last couple of local papers, the Fish and Game people are talking about the deer and other critters that are dying. Between cold and starvation (food under feet of snow and ice) it’s already been a hard year for them.

    You can’t hunt what you can’t find, especially if it’s just not there. How many years did it take for the game numbers to return to normal after the Great Depression? My little town of 12k,

    Those who live in places where hogs and Nutria thrive may have the best chances. Since it seems impossible to get rid of them normally.

    #51384
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Well, somebody apparently didn’t like an earlier post in which I mentioned a specific company, even though that’s been done many times before in many contexts. So, I’ll just try again with a short non-specific paragraph, and leave it at that, hoping it doesn’t disappear too.

    With reference to earlier comments in previous posts above, lubes don’t have to be a problem in extreme cold, whether for engines or firearms. I’ve personally seen synthetic 80w90 gear lube stored at 0°F still easily pour out of its container. Pour points of engine oil are well below that. High quality synthetic lubes are easily available for both engines and firearms (and more). I’ve been using them in all our vehicles since 1978, and wouldn’t use anything else in them or on my firearms. Nor would my father-in-law before his death – and he treated his with the greatest of care.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #51516
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Winter kill. Every year were in a battle with the dear to protect our shrubs. This being bombogenesis week it’s going to snow hard all day. This of course leads to SDS – snow derangement syndrome. People are always on a schedule. Interrupt that schedule and the panic starts. Snow emergency on all the streets. Park and be towed. My daughter already told me I have to keep the driveway open. She’s got a job that’s won’t wait. And I said no I can’t. I don’t want to be the winter kill myself. But she’s determined to test x mode on her Subaru. Go for it says I. I’ll just feed the fire until the storm lets up. The learning curve of a millennial is pretty steep sometimes.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by Profile photo of Brulen Brulen.
    • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by Profile photo of Brulen Brulen.
    #51519
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Brulen, some of us never learn. I’m in for the day now and will enjoy watching the blizzard in the comfort of the woodstove making it nice and toasty. I had been out and about for the morning running a couple errands and working at the Town Hall. Coming down the mountain on my side isn’t so bad as the grade and the curves are OK but the other side is “hope nobody is coming up when you’re going down and nobody is coming down when you are going up” when it’s snowing or is icy. The steepest part is on the sharpest curve, and there aren’t any shoulders. Fortunately I had it to myself going down. Coming home however there was a plow coming down as I was going into that part so I inched over as best I could which caused me to lose most of my upward momentum which made for a slow climb and occasional spinning the rest of the way. Its just part of living up here I suppose.

    #51520
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Maybe it’s just been too long (nearly a half century), but I’m having trouble remembering why I liked living up there. Winters were pretty, the countryside beautiful in summer, but oh – those winters! I’m sure older age has at least something to do with it, but I wouldn’t take that cold now for anything in the world. I learned to drive in Buffalo, but wouldn’t want to try those tricks again ever in my lifetime. I’ll risk a little hydroplaning, and just slow down a bit, when driving down here. And on the extremely rare occasion (count ‘em on one hand in the past 30+ years since we came back to Georgia) that we get a couple of inches of snow on the road, Nancy Reagan’s old “just say no!” philosophy works just fine for me for 24-48 hours. LOL! But in all honesty, my hat’s off to Tolik, WB, Brulen, MB, and the others that stick it out in those areas. I recognize the benefits, it’s just that the cold and weather like today in the east, “trump” all the benefits (no pun intended, but recognized). ;-)

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #51521
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    GS

    No problem here. Just warm comfortable living room. Definitely a snow bomb event. Everything shut down.. Emergency declared. Storm of the century type stuff. Yesterday the stores were packed with people. I expect they got everything they needed. I gave my daughter the snow shoes to get home. She only works a quarter mile away. She came home for lunch and left the Ru sitting in the driveway. Whew! Its being slowly buried now. Only a little bit of the sides still showing. Just a big bump in the driveway.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by Profile photo of Brulen Brulen.
    #51523
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    GS, up here for big storms like this most folks will just stay home. Small storms we just ignore and go about our business. I was out this morning but came home before the wind started howling and creating whiteout conditions. The snow is piling up fast. Other than an ATV that roared down my road a while ago I’m not seeing anyone out now. Probably just kids having fun. The beauty of it all makes it worth it in my opinion. Its been an odd winter overall weather-wise.

    #51524
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Some people are stranded in the state of sunshine… And some of us are stranded in a state of snow. At least we’re not in an airport. :-)

    Looks like our local cops are going to regret giving up their awd suv for the interceptor bat mobile.

    Burglary weather.

    I learned something tonight lol. Don’t try to use the front end of a vehicle suv to make a path thru very deep snow. Use the rear. It pushes snow better. It might take several try’s but you can clear a path.

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by Profile photo of Brulen Brulen.
    • This reply was modified 1 week, 6 days ago by Profile photo of Brulen Brulen.
    #51528
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    MB,
    Oh, I remember it all too well, and how we dealt with it. I didn’t leave Buffalo until age 21 – long enough to gain all the experienced I needed for a lifetime. And one of the nice things about senility is that we forget the short term things first, but retain the long term memories almost to the end. My long term memory is very much intact – I still remember that 1-mile race I ran in my senior year of high school in late May – during snow flurries. LOL. (As an aside, another advantage about senility is that it beats depression – at least then you can’t remember what you were depressed about. ;-) )

    We’re not without our issues down here with the cold, however. A good friend of mine, just north of Chattanooga, TN, (JUST across the GA border a few hours from here) will lose all his peaches tonight and tomorrow night. All of his trees bloomed already – and it’s low 20s or upper teens the next two nights – only got into the low 30s today, he said. Such a shame – he was expecting a beautiful peach crop for him and his wife this year.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #51537
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    42 inches of snow here in central Nys. In the blink of an eye the whole landscape changed to deep white. It’s nice to look at but a barn collapsed nearby 8-10 cows out of 20 were killed or had to be put down. Not good for cows. I shoveled roof yesterday and I’ll be shoveling roof today. Lucky my snowblower worked well. It broke down in the last storm burned belt and I had all the belts replaced. It’s a cub cadet 4 foot wide walk behind. That strip along the lake in buffalo has the worst weather. But we’re so used to snow we take it is stride. Just one more nasty thing that happens. We’re always watching the weather. On the plus side it’s been warmer lately. Not the weeks of -20F like when I was growing up. We has a travel ban for a couple of days. It was cool not seeing all the cars and imagining horses on the roads again. That era knew how to build houses and barns that didn’t fall down. Now nobody builds a house without an architect. Too much national historic garbage in Ny. That’s worse than a little snow.

    #51547
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Funny, all of you out east are enjoying what we had for months.
    Meanwhile we sat right at 60 for the last three days. The snow is vanishing here but holding up nicely at higher elevation. The whole high alpine desert thing does mess with you.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.