Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
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  • #13181
    Frozenthunderbolt
    Frozenthunderbolt
    Survivalist
    member4

    Just bought one of these from a NZ vendor for NZ$95 (I believe you can get them cheaper in US).
    Theoretically the same model is made for the Indian army by Windlass.

    Weight is just under 600gms
    Blade length is just on 30cm, with another 12cm of wood handle and brass pommel.

    It was sold blunt (as in won’t cut butter square edge) as technically they have to be exported as ‘ornaments’.
    I was initially worried as when I took a file to the edge to start re-working it it bit heavily (and I expected poor heat treatment) but after 15 min with a file, another 15 with sanding discs and sand paper, then another 5 with a butchers steel it had a reasonable edge.

    I did some test cutting with it on some very dense, dry standing wood in my yard and then about 1.5 hours of trimming and cutting up plum tree prunings.
    Counterintuitively, this actually burnished the edge and seems to have made it sharper!
    I am quite happy with the edge, and expect it will improve with the odd touch up sharpening and burnishing with my steel.
    The only modification I will make to the knife will be to round off the top and bottom corner of the brass pommel which are a little too acute and dig into the had a little when it is snapped out to the full extension of a swing.

    The knife came with a leather on wood sheath with a brass tip, and a pressure fitted slip on leather belt loops.
    The sheath has spaces for the Chakmak and Karda, and another small pouch, all built into it on the back.
    The Chakmak (blunt blade to use as a steel) and Karda (small blade for fine tasks) that came with the kukri and sheath were complete rubbish – hopeless.
    To remady this I loosened the bandoleer so I could fit in a decent skinning knife that I made myself (3inch blade 2.5inch handle) alongside the main blade.
    I removed the Chakmak and Karda and replaced them with a small diamond sharpening steel and a Ferrocerium fire making rod.
    My final modification to the sheath unit will be to whip the outside with black para-cord and add a woven para-cord sling to  be able to wear it across my chest and have it sit under my armpit just above my hip.

    I figure this gives me the guts of everything I need short term; fire (and thus clean water), cordage (and thus shelter and a bow), and versatile blades for defense, trapping, whittling etc.

    If you’re keen let me know, and i’ll try post some photos

    #13189
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Frozenthunderbolt, thanks for your review, I would like an image if possible.

    #13306
    Frozenthunderbolt
    Frozenthunderbolt
    Survivalist
    member4

    Top: the sheath for the Kukri with the sheath i made for my skining knife tucked into it.
    Next to top: skinning/detail knife i made from a piece of industrial hacksaw blade and slabs of Banksia wood. It is sharp enough to shave with.
    Middle: The Kukri from Windlass Steelcrafts, looking a lot more beat up than when i got it (80 grit sandpaper slipped) but way more functional. I still want to narrow the edge in the bottom hollow, but I’m very happy with the chopping edge across the rest of the blade now. I’ve rounded off the top of the pommel slightly.
    Bottom left: USA made ExotacPollystrikerXL fire rod and striker. This is the only bit that doesn’t yet fit perfectly; I’m currently thinking I’ll trim down the handles on the rod and striker and drill new holes for their lanyard so the two parts will fit nicely in one of the Chakmak pockets.
    Bottom Middle: AccuSharp® Diamond Rod Sharpener: an unbreakable diamond-coated steel rod used to sharpen all kinds of knives, including serrated edges. The retractable rod is engineered with a cone-shaped end for use on serrations and tight spaces. The diamond-coated steel rod also has sharpening grooves for use with all kinds of hooks, darts, and pointed objects. this works well, almost too well; I’m tossing up weather to cut and mount a short section of proper butchers steel instead.
    Bottom right: the ‘chakmak’ and ‘kada’ supplied with the Kukri. Essentially useless – I’m going to try sharpening one tonight with my lansky system just for giggles. Not sure what possible use they might have.

    I’ve bought a couple of hanks of black paracord for my father in law to use to braid me a sling for it, and to whip the bottom of the sheath with. I’l try to remember to add another photo of that once it is done.

    #13324
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thanks for the review Frozenthunderbolt!

    #13377
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Nice Kukri, thanks for posting the review.

    #17697
    Profile photo of Anselm
    Anselm
    Survivalist
    member6

    It’s knife and hatchet in one. Saves weight.

    And, if it’s not too personal, why use the Eye of Horus?

    #17718
    Frozenthunderbolt
    Frozenthunderbolt
    Survivalist
    member4

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Anselm wrote:</div>It’s knife and hatchet in one. Saves weight.

    And, if it’s not too personal, why use the Eye of Horus?

    It is – it takes a different style of use to a machette – more of a wrist based ‘snap’ rather than a swing or slash, but I’m coming to really apprecaite what it can do.

    As for the Udjat, the myth associated with it appeals to me; Horus was a good chap and the Udjat embodies/symbolises sacrifice, healing, restoration, and protection.

    #17782
    Profile photo of Anselm
    Anselm
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thank you, Frozenthunderbolt. I’ve been fascinated by the Udjat since the movie “Now You See Me”, of which there should soon be a sequel. Are you generally into Egyptology?

    As to blades, I have never used my own kukri, so I don’t yet know how it compares with a machete. I also wonder how a machete would compare with a cutlass, both for brush cutting and to fight; do you have the experience? Can one use the same movement for the one and the other?

    #17800
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Anselm,
    I’m going to answer for Frozen, I haven’t seen a post from him for a while.
    The kukri blade is shorter then a true machete so you cannot achive the same velocity at the tip. This reduces the power slightly. However the curved blade shape draws the object into the knife, a straight blade tends to push or let material slip away. Because it is shorter then a machete it has more ultily and is handier for regular knife work.

    Most machete do not have a hand guard and the blades are relatively thin, not designed for forces across the flat of the blade. In a fight I’d take a big cutlass anytime over a flimsy machete.

    #17824
    Profile photo of Anselm
    Anselm
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thank you very much, 74.

    Would a cutlass be as effective as a machete to hack through vegetation? Note that, if a machete has a blade length of, say, 18″, a cutlass might be 21″ to 23″, and, yes, it is much stronger. Would there be a drawback to the use of the cutlass on dense plant growth?

    As to Frozen, he has not vanished; he answered a question of mine yesterday. See above. Great positive spirit, those New Zealanders …

    #17827
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews
    #17857
    Profile photo of Anselm
    Anselm
    Survivalist
    member6

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>74 wrote:</div>
    http://www.history.navy.mil/library/online/uniform_sword.htm

    Oh well sorry for jumping in then :)

    74, I appreciate immensely your jumping in; helpful people are all too scarce.

    What I’m really driving at with the machete/cutlass question is this. It is legal to carry a machete if one is decked out as a gardener. It is never legal to carry a cutlass. The machete has a thinner, flimsier blade, but it seems to be a superb weapon in hands trained for its use. In the 19th century, in Cuban rural areas, the soldiers trying to put down the secessionists’ rebellion found that they simply could not fight with their heavy Mausers with bayonets against the lightning-fast machete slashes of the rebels; they were forced to take up the machete themselves. I recently got a machete course on DVD’s that seems excellent; it teaches how to use a machete, or two at a time, one in each hand. The arm movements are essentially circular and figure 8. What I’d like to know is if the cutlass could be used with the exact same movements — notwithstanding that it can also stab effectively. As things stand, the machete can be used either to garden or to fight. I know the cutlass is great in a fight, but can it work as a shrub cutter? I lack the experience. If we are in a WROL situation, it will no longer be illegitimate to carry a cutlass, so one could have a much stronger weapon than the machete and dispense with the machete altogether.

    Let me know if the above is too muddled, and I will try to rephrase it.

    #17872
    Frozenthunderbolt
    Frozenthunderbolt
    Survivalist
    member4

    Yep I LOVE my Tramontina Machette. Beautiful high quality Brazillian made steel. Can shave with it and will also lop through a 2 inch bamboo in one go – very light and very fast

    #17881
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Anselm,

    I’m sure a cutlass will slash brush, however using a finely made weapon as a garden tool becomes the question. Using a garden tool as a weapon, no problem.

    http://www.coldsteel.com/Product/88CS/1917_CUTLASS.aspx

    #17884
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Hey Mr. Freeze…

    Thanks for posting this. I’ve always wondered what “those goofy-lookin’ knives” were like (that’s what I called them when I was younger. :) ). To me, they looked like people-choppers more than anything else, and that reverse curve on the blade made it look downright nasty. The grip, except for the flare (likely there to keep the thing from flying out of your hand when you swing) looks more ceremonial than functional. But what the hell do I know? I don’t own one. :) Again, thanks for posting. Might invest in one after all.

    @ Anselm

    “It is never legal to carry a cutlass.” Erm… it depends. Here in the Commonwealth, we have open carry and concealed carry. This is for a “deadly weapon”. “Deadly weapon” does not necessarily mean a firearm. In fact, if you have a Class 3 license for a select fire weapon, you can combine that with a CCW (Concealed Carry Weapon) license and therefore are legal to carry something like a submachine pistol – like a micro Uzi or a Scorpion – concealed. There is nothing preventing you from doing so. Since a cutlass would fall under “deadly weapon”, so long as you had your CCW or open carried, you would be totally legal.

    (Legal? Yes. Immune from being harassed and jacked up by the local cops? Not so much. Someone walking around with a sword on their hip would attract attention, even here in Dirtville. You’d be legal – in fact, I would even carry a copy of the statute with you, just so you can show the cops that you’re legal – but you’d probably get jacked up anyways… )

    After TSHTF though, I wouldn’t much care. Anyone with any brains at all will be armed up to the eyeballs…

    By the way, if you like cutlasses, Jas Townsend carries a forged steel, plain Jane cutlass. All business. No shiny stuff. Put an edge on it and I doubt anyone would mess with ya… the sheath looks sort of chintzy, so I would make a new one out of thick leather – cow butt – and sling it over my shoulder.

    The cutlass:

    http://jas-townsend.com/naval-short-sword-sheath-p-1340.html

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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