Viewing 8 posts - 31 through 38 (of 38 total)
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  • #39540
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Brulen,
    Have you tried the pvc? I’m wondering if it will be stiff enough to maintain tension on the blade and not distort in the center under pressure. The aspect I really like that Mors advocates is being able to not carry the frame and make one when you need it. I bought 36″ blades because I can carry the blade in a belt and not have it overlap when fastened around my waist.

    74, I’d almost forgotten about that project. Time to get out my trusty SAK Swiss army knife and give it a try. I wouldn’t use regular Pvc for water lines but instead use grey electrical conduit stuff. The sak has a saw, a knife and awl. If I can’t make somekind of buck with really simple tools the idea wouldn’t be very useful.

    #39541
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Brulen,
    It is very much like a sword scabbard, although for a sword stiffer materials would be better. I actually made a scabbard for a short sword not long ago using 1/8″ thickness luan plywood. I doubled the rail laminate forming 1/4″ thickness. For my blade this is to much clearance and it would rattle in the scabbard. Using a block plane I reduced the thickness tapering the rails to fit the blade. About 3/16 at the grip to 1/8 at the blade tip. This can be checked by laying the blade into the channel and using a straight edge across both rails. A little clearance is needed or the blade will jam in place never to come out without destroying the scabbard. To prevent the wood from swelling in wet weather, I coated the total inside surface of both sides with epoxy before final assembly and let it cure. I clamped the parts together before assembly to ensure the blade still slides in and out freely. Assemble the scabbard by gluing the scabbard side on with epoxy. After the glue dried I coated the outside with epoxy, with paticular interest in filling the open wood grain on the edges. As of now the scabbard is just painted black. Sometime or another I plan to cover the scabbard with black leather and a brass tip to eliminate wear. I need to decide how to carry the sword at that point and will probably attach it to a cross body shoulder strap.

    Goodwill stores usually have old leather coats for cheap. I’ll buy one for the leather. Cut the scabbard cover and make ribbon for the grip from the coat.

    #39581
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    https://www.wynnchester.co.uk/

    old style waxed cotton … poncho and foraging bag

    http://www.brailleman.com/#/poncho/4544387693 for those who need fashion lol the lining is nice in wool.

    only reason to use plastic is for certain kinds of imaging…3mm of poly propylene is enough to disrupt. it tears it is hard to repair… wax…well you can find that easy. gortex or that type of material is loud as hell you can hear it coming a mile away.

    i do have gore tex clothing but only for “sport”

    #39583
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I like the Swiss Aspenflage ponchos. They’re kind of heavy but they’re big, waterproof forever and durable. Plus they’re cammo.

    #39594
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    https://www.wynnchester.co.uk/

    old style waxed cotton … poncho and foraging bag

    http://www.brailleman.com/#/poncho/4544387693 for those who need fashion lol the lining is nice in wool.

    only reason to use plastic is for certain kinds of imaging…3mm of poly propylene is enough to disrupt. it tears it is hard to repair… wax…well you can find that easy. gortex or that type of material is loud as hell you can hear it coming a mile away.

    i do have gore tex clothing but only for “sport”

    waxed cotton…. Like a Filson jacket. I have one with a hood I bought years ago. made for rain wind and snow. It’s a little heavy but well made, very durable if it’s taken care of properly.

    #39598
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    What’s in my wilderness survival kit is a digging tool. To build a Dakota fire You have to move dirt. I have 3.
    One is the standard extremely heavy duty military folder.
    Another is the Glock with plastic handle and saw.
    The third is the Cold Steel Spetsnaz all purpose straight blade.

    I’ve noticed in the illustration on the Boot Camp area of a Dakota Fire the air appears to be going the wrong way. LoL I checked out a number of videos on Utube (3) and only one guy did it right. He built a cold weather heating system under his camp site using a flue pipe as a chimney. The air flowed into his fire thru his chamber heating the rocks and earth above, then out the flue. It worked very much like a gasifier. That’s what I think of as a Dakota fire. Very little smoke when it gets going and very hot. It’s the kind of fire you could use in an enclosed space without smoking yourself out.

    #39600
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Brulen,
    Which tool is the better one for digging?

    #39619
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Brulen,
    Which tool is the better one for digging?

    I’m really comfortable with the U.S. military folder. HD construction. Good for building a hidden cache. I sharpened the spetsnaz shovel, it makes a good weed whacker… surreptitious self defense tool. Not as good as a sword, won’t cut off an arm or head. You need to customize it for that kind of action. Better handle better grip.

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