Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 38 total)
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  • #32127
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Good kit sarge

    #32129
    Profile photo of sargemsb
    sargemsb
    Survivalist
    member1

    Thanks, it’s been working for me on 3 continents for over 40 years. Every now and then I’ll find something worthy of adding. I recently abandoned my Mini-Mag Lite in favor of an LED headlamp, because I could not get replacement bulbs anymore.

    I swear that I will defend the Constitution against all enemies - foreign and domestic. Sargemsb

    #32131
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    LEd’s are so much better and so is a head lamp, for non lethal work anyway. I don’t want a light on my head if I’m in an armed encounter.

    #32168
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Toby C, I have been reading Mors Kochanski’s ebook called Basic Safe Travel and Boreal Survival Handbook. It’s an amazing work on survival in the boreal forest.

    Take a look at his low tech survival kit. He builds everything he needs from local materials.

    #32192
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    That must be a 36 inch bowsaw blade Mors has around his waist. Its been a long time since I used a bucksaw but I could probably make one from scratch. In the winter I switch to suspenders for comfort. Its a good idea for a compression strap around a backpack. I have a sven saw that I use generally. The blade is sharp and cuts fast. Different tooth pattern than a bowsaw. There are two sizes one short and a bigger one for larger limbs. My kit is a get home kit. For one of those crazy emergencies I also carry three blizzard survival bags. They’re a doubled up mylar sleeping bag. I tend to carry a lot of stuff, more than I need. Winter is nasty so I have a canadian military parka and snow boots in my vehicle plus mainstay survival bars and water in foil packets jic.
    Where Mors gets his rope I have no idea. Its flat? The only type thats like that is kevlar winch rope. Its really high load. I replaced my steel atv cable with it and bought an extra 50 foot length for my pack. It comes in green and other colors. For winter use I.ve got an arctic doublewalled military canteen with a cook pot that fits on the bottom. its always good to have a few condoms and socks around for extra storage. The Atlas kind – unlubricated.
    *changed the bowsaw blade to 36 inch from 30 inch, just to be more useful. It would take a lot of sawing to wear that out. They are also hard to find here, but readily available on amazon. duh

    #32197
    Profile photo of foodforthought
    foodforthought
    Survivalist
    member2

    I just found this, and i had to share

    upward and onward

    #32206
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Mors Kochanski has a design for making a bucksaw with items found in the woods in his book Bushcraft. Todd, at Suvival Sherpa has a post and video on how to make it. This is a much better solution than using a hatch or axe to build a Mors Kochanski’s super shelter and for getting lots of firewood for surviving the cold of the north:

    http://survivalsherpa.wordpress.com/2014/11/12/how-to-build-a-sturdy-takedown-bucksaw/

    #32254
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    For a bucksaw …. the design I like after looking at Utube & Mors is more of a hybrid. Use one inch pvc electrical conduit for the ends. In the middle use a piece of 4 quarter maple mortise and tenon to the Pvc. Wedge the ends for easy takedown. Instead of a 36 inch blade i’d get a 42. Thats’s a bit bigger but you can make it a push pull two person bow saw and save a lot of labor. Cut Cut Cut at least a cord per night outdoors in zero weather.

    And be sure to add wood cores to the pvc ends for the screws and tensioning parts. Pvc is tough but not as tough as hardwood. If you can find ironwood it would probably last forever.

    #39456
    Profile photo of dutch_viking
    dutch_viking
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    hello survival friends ,
    i love this topic :) its what i am all about wilderness survival and gear,
    i am a real outdoor freak and if my wife and kids let me i am always out and about scouting the woods training skills and enjoy nature my gear is always changing with the seasons some items are standard others not …..

    MY GEAR :
    2 x alice pack medium (spring and summer and fall green and brown ) (black grey and white winter time)
    each one contains a couple fixed items :
    2 pocho,s 2 x 3 meters
    50 ft paracord
    cooking set
    ground cover
    drum liner bag
    head lamp
    1 scout axe
    1 belt knife
    1 folding saw
    1heavy duty survival blade
    first aid kit (minimal)
    wool blanket swiss army
    altoids fire kit (flint and steel chared cloth jutte twine cotton rags
    water purrification tabs
    bandanna,s
    2 drinking bottles (stainless)
    dacron fishing line 100 pound tested
    snare wire
    slingshot and ball bearings
    thermal shirt and pants (spare)
    bic lighters firesteel matches freshnell lens
    compas and grid maps My area 200 kilometers radius
    bungee cords
    fishing kit and lures
    home made fatwood , cottonballs vaseline , (surefire)
    needle and tread
    tie wraps ductape electrical tape .
    sunglasses with changeable glasses (orange/yellow , dark )
    earplugs
    S.A.S Survival guide pocket edition for reading
    flare gun mini with 6 rounds 3 red 3 green

    i am saving for a powerful compound bow long range hunting…..

    enjoy the woods and love mother nature :))

    #39466
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Brulen,
    Have you tried the pvc? I’m wondering if it will be stiff enough to maintain tension on the blade and not distort in the center under pressure. The aspect I really like that Mors advocates is being able to not carry the frame and make one when you need it. I bought 36″ blades because I can carry the blade in a belt and not have it overlap when fastened around my waist.

    #39515
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    What sort of belt do you use to carry your saw blade in? It sounds like a great idea, I’d never heard/thought of it before! :)

    #39520
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Toby,
    My blades just came last week so I haven’t made the belt. I can layout my plan now for you and I’ll post a thread when the belt is done.

    The blade is 36″ x 3/4 x 1/16 kerf. I was going to use an old belt for a base, but the belt must be straight, and old belts take a set and are bent on edge. Using a leather belt at least 1.5″ wide I will laminate a second layer of thinner leather to the inside. Before laminating the 2 layers glue a 1/6 thick x 1/4″ piece of plastic the full lenght on each edge of the belt forming 2 rails. Make certain the blade slides between the rails. This will keep the layers of leather separated forming a sheath, and prevent the saw from cutting through the belt. Glue the second inside layer of the belt onto the plastic rails. The edge of the belt must be stiched together with a strong thread like waxed nylon. Mark a line 1/8″ from each edge. (If you want this to look good buy a leather lacing and stiching punch. The stiching punch has 2, 4 or 8 punches in equal distant spacing just like a fork). Punch both sides creating stiching holes. Thread each side of the belt using double stiching. Dress each side of the belt smoothing the leather edges then dye each edge.

    When the belt is complete tie a ribbon through one of the blade bolt holes and slide the blade into the belt. The blade usually has 2 bolt holes, align the last hole with the belt buckle hole and put it on with the buckle holding the blade in place. Pulling on the ribbon will allow you to remove the blade from the belt.

    The finished belt will be a thick stiff belt suitable for load carrying and can be used for a gun belt, etc.

    #39533
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    good job 74! almost sounds like a sword scabbard.

    #39535
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    forgot to add hide some last resort trade items hidden in side when stitching up some items makes a good sap in a pinch.

    to dutch_Viking

    i see you didn t mention sock… i hope you have more than a few as well as toilet paper/ wet wipes the other thing to pack is some tylenol 3 for both pain relief and incase you get the runs it will plug you up and help the cramps. Nothing worse than a rash in the ass and having to walk long hard miles.

    No tin opener is a big thing too it is hard on knives and axe… i also see no sharpener?

    I hope you dont take this wrong way dutch_Viking but without those few things life can be rough. I hope on of the ss botles you have is open at top and can be used to cook or boil water…. a spork is minimal on eating utensils.

    Also no food… should have at least a few days worth over on top of planned rations cause well **** happens.

    i would pack a few womens sanitary napkins +duct tape you have… best bandages ever and non stick lol.Lets face it most accidents are no covered with a small band aid.

    a few spare batteries for your gear and a light of some kind other than fire, a multi tool is useful in many ways an axe and a saw wont work. i know each has it use but for want of a leatherman you can get some serious trouble.

    instead of companion bow you might think of making 2 arrows with hunting tips, take out the notch and put a golf tee into it so you can use your sling shot with a whisker biscuit effective for most small game and when would you want to take something big in a survival situation unless SHFT scenario. lots of small game in most places. some folded heavy aluminum foil can come in real handy cooking and taking cooked food with you if you have to move.

    the fishing line is good but the idea of using lures is nice but in real survival make a net with the stuff and a Y tree branch and scoop up dinner.

    you can add all of these thing for less than 3 lbs

    the ponchos you have dont make noise in rain or when you move do they?

    #39538
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    “the ponchos you have dont make noise in rain or when you move?” Namelus

    I’ve found that wind & rain make enough background noise to cover any noise made moving around by a person. Short of playing a drum a little noise from clothing isn’t going to matter.

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