Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 61 total)
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  • #35444
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Gwyddone, given Hungary’s history back to WWII and then subsequently when the Soviets took over in 1956 I am surprised that most people can’t see the possibility of a major SHTF scenario. I think most American’s naively think it can’t happen here because all of our wars for the past 150 years have been fought someplace else but all of Eastern Europe especially should understand these things. Your grandparents would have lived through it. Maybe it is just human nature that people are optimistic by nature and don’t think bad things can happen.

    #35445
    Profile photo of Gwyddone
    Gwyddone
    Newbie
    member2

    Freedom, I am already saving seeds and regularly cultivating seedlings – we are quite picky in choosing e.g. peppers (mine is a bit masochist family, so they have to be flaming hot), a particular type of sweet but fleshy tomato, broccoli, beet, lettuce, cucumber, dill, parsil, an almost perfectly orange-coloured carrot, etc. besides, seeds can be insanely expensive. We have a small strawberry parcel, and a fig tree, too, and a great walnut tree, a smaller almond tree, which is starting to bring fruit, and my father built a hen pen, but is it used as a storage now (my eldest sister also moved home). We have place for a few hens, now, at least (I helped to build a few more cages). Main worry is, that our boxers think they are hounds, and the last two time a rabbit got loose, they ended up catching them (in a heartbeat, expertly), breaking their neck with a small move, and proudly bringing them to the family member present. We also had a very strange illness in the rabbit pen, with only 3 survivors (and no small bunnies! We couldn’t even eat them!), and the vet said that even with the vaccines, it might happen again.
    The problem with growing food is that it demands really much time and work, and most of us works overtime, in insane schedules, and on alarm at every time. We acquired the ‘expertise’, and at least our crops are quite good, but we would need a much bigger garden to be near self-sustaining, and more workforce (which, as you pointed out, can be got with the promise of food).
    We also have a crazy old witch for a neighbour, who, while growing flowers and a few fruits for selling, barks at us every time we work in the garden, and in the past poisoned our cats and dogs… so she is out of the picture.

    The rural relatives… well, I’m not really sure I want to bug out to them, they are loud, and would spill the beans (literally and figuratively) way too soon. A possible bug out location might be my grandpa’s vinery, but it is really small, and not well-equipped (while I might be able to convince gramps that the storage etc might be needed). Also, it is too close to the city, in a rapidly urbanizing little village.

    It might sound like a joke, but I consider my previous workplace a much better bug out location. It is a military memorial park, on the hilltop, farther away from the city, but still could be reached in an hour on a bike, has a real trench, an old tank and some artillery, and a well-hidden barrack with a proper officer’s shelter. The place contains loads of military equipment, fake and real, generators, a well-equipped workshop, and could be easily fortified (even with the battle-reenactment supplies). One of the buildings has a vine cellar, which could function as a shelter, and has a well-built fireplace for cooking. There is a big storage place, and even a spring nearby, plus a small lake. The park itself is in the woods, which is rich in edible mushrooms, nice berries and other fruits, and thanks to the rangers’ efforts, even deers. On another hand, the woods also have foxes in them, and golden jackals (they are nasty, even if right now they are only robbing our garbage containers). There are also cultivated vineries, crop fields, and a few farms nearby, with various animals. In the WWII, the place where the MMP is now was a real outpost, and in the revolutions, there was a famous battle there – so the downside is, the area itself is strategical, and the traffic is easily controllable. There is only one way in for vehicles, and one for bikes, but there are several small, and quite hidden tracks, which is not really good, but you could place a few guard here and there, and they could control the whole place. If I could afford it, I’d still like to choose a place like this.
    Sorry about that. Daydreaming.

    "just a little girl"

    #35447
    Profile photo of Gwyddone
    Gwyddone
    Newbie
    member2

    MountainBiker, that what I think. With the Ukrainian problems nearby, and an economical disaster at our hands, I really cannot understand why I’m the freak and way too obsessed with my job for pointing this out. But gramps think it won’t happen again under this leadership, my aunt is too optimistic about their possibilities, and my father think they can keep order if SHTF. Well, my mom and I see the humans and not the institute, and since we had to work out an emergency plan for every possibilities, and interact with the volunteers, military, and firefighters, we know that even if everybody tries to work hard, there are simply not enough resources, and in some scenarios, there isn’t a good solution. We are too close to a nuclear plant (and there is another one not far away), some part of the city was a swamp (even the part where we live), close to factories etc.
    Minor example, but two years ago, on the spring, was a snow emergency in the whole country. I volunteered then, too, and I was surprised with the sheer amount of people who (after advisories, no less!) took the road without a bit of food, a blanked, a torch or even a bottle of tea in the car. We had to supply nappies, buckloads of them! Several parents didn’t think to pack even one, or some toys for the children! No joke, I had to canvass from door to door nearby the shelter, since we couldn’t reach the bigger stores, and the neighbouring small ones were robbed bare after the first day. Some places were without electricity. We pulled through, by the way, and gave out some food, blankets etc, but I was rather surprised by the volume of the people who didn’t think this through. We are experiencing snow days now. I won’t like to reenact everything from then, especially since I have to take care of my own district. Floods are expected after a winter like this, too.
    Sometimes, I just want to give up.

    "just a little girl"

    #35451
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Gwyddone,
    Knowing your not ready for a long term shtf can be disconcerting but don’t let it set you off. You’re much farther ahead of most other people, the ones not even concidering the possibility of an emergency. Prepping with low funding is the epitome of eating the elephant, one bite at a time.

    #35453
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Gwyddone, Well you have the seeds ready. Just because you and your family doesn’t have the time right now is not a problem. These seeds will be very important if the SHTF times were everyone in your family will then help with the growing of food in the garden. The Idea is to grow a small amount all the time so you have a good idea of what it takes to grow them right and healthy. Once the SHTF you need to have food stored so that it give you and your family time to start the garden full time.

    I think you are doing a great job for the time at hand and the amount of money at hand. Many people like you don’t do anything at all.

    #35456
    Profile photo of Gwyddone
    Gwyddone
    Newbie
    member2

    Thanks! Actually reconsidering everything, you are right, and maybe I’m urging things without the need to. For a short term, we will pull off, and actually I have a decent EDC pack which bailed me out abroad, too. I’m more concerned about my family:) but I will continue to prepare by myself, if I have to.
    I could pinpoint what set off my panic. Just last weekend, when I was selling my jewelry on the marketplace, a man (seemingly quite well-off) came to me. He bought all my silver necklaces, some of my rings, and he said while they were beautiful, and he valued my handiwork, he chose them because of the weight of the silver. He said he needed them for trading off for food and tools later. After that, and getting another workload on CP, I got scared a bit… Now I’m a bit more relaxed. Thanks for the help!

    "just a little girl"

    #35460
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Unfortunately, not everyone can even locate likeminded people, nor have the $ to prep properly. We know we don’t have much of a chance. I am 72, in good health but not as strong as I used to be. My husband, while very intelligent and skilled, knowledgable about security/reloading/firearms etc–is a double amputee. So we are not the ‘first choice’ of anyone’s group. IF we could even find one…closer than an hour away by car. We do have one friend/couple with a small farm (5 acres) 5 miles away, but if things get really bad really quickly, we may not be able to get there.

    We live on a small lot on the edge of a small city (25,000+) with rural land about 2 blocks away. Have a small veggie garden, planting berries this spring and maybe an apple tree. Can have chickens. Stocking up our pantry. And ammo. But the house has huge windows, poor tottering fence, and the neighborhood is iffy. Not secure by any means.

    The upshot is, we just do the best we can, store as much as we can afford, and as my husband says: Take an honor guard with you when you go….

    And, trust in God. Even if we die, that is not the end of our existence.

    #35461
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    wildartist, you’re better off than most folks. chickens can be a great source of food for the investment.

    #35462
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    wildartist, the knowledge and skills that you and your husband share still puts you ahead of most folks even if the overall situation isn’t the best. Yes, any group will value strong young bodies because they fill a very real need, but at the same time any group needs skill and experience too. We all have our own set of limitations. Your husband can add great value to a group by giving them skills and knowledge others don’t have.

    #35574
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I agree with MB on this. The knowledge and skills you and your husband can offer many is priceless.

    #44593
    Profile photo of dutch_viking
    dutch_viking
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    you know for years i never had some one that i could call a friend …..
    what is that a friend ?
    i sure as hell wish i new ….
    i live in a big city next door neighbors only 3 feet from mine ….
    occasional hello and goodbye …some chatter about the weather…..

    there all to busy running around with there heads up there ass….
    cleaning there cars on there freakin lunch break…

    i often go to the woods and just sit there for hours at a time ….
    building a fire or fumbling around with a featherstick ….

    just me and mother nature ……..
    its all good for me …..

    #44602
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Dutch, there are many people like yourself who prefer solitude. There is nothing wrong with that. I don’t know if your SHTF plans include making a go for it in the city where you now live or if you plan on relocating, but regardless, come SHTF, could you shift gears and work with your neighbors for mutual aid and support be it in the city or elsewhere that you plan to be?

    #44603
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    For 2 years myself and 108 others lived, ate and worked within 1000 square feet. After the first month I felt like running each and everyone over with a truck. I imagine they felt the same. I became a robot.
    I was a caretaker of a national historic site for 10 years. The dogs, coyotes, armadillos and other critters were my only companions within 1,750 acres. I had found heaven!
    Robin

    #44608
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    occasional hello and goodbye …some chatter about the weather…..

    there all to busy running around with there heads up there ass….
    cleaning there cars on there freakin lunch break…

    I know what you mean, people are a pain, I wouldn’t trust one of them as far as I could throw them, and that’s in the good times never mind post SHTF!

    British Survivalist.

    #44612
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I may be doomed regardless, but I like people and can always find something to relate to them person to person. When I am out for a walk and see someone in their yard that I haven’t met before I will just walk up to them to introduce myself. I’ll do the same at social gatherings. When I next see those new acquaintances I will stop and say hello. If I see someone needs a hand I will stop to help. That said I think I can size folks and situations up fairly quickly and know when to be cautious and/or steer clear.

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