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  • #15117
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Many times I have been asked “What was it like to……” Until now I have never been able to give an answer: Was it hell? Yes. Do I miss it? Yes. Would I do it again? Yes.

    Why?

    My answer, up to now, has been something like: “Beats the sh*t out of me!”

    Now I can give a better reason.

    http://www.funker530.com/why-soldiers-miss-war/

    Robin

    #15119
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    There’s a reason Cops are Cops. Same as soldiers.

    Adrenaline and your place.

    There is something to be said for what happens when you’ve been a cop (soldier) long enough. You start wanting and needing the adrenaline ‘fix’.

    That high speed chase, isn’t so fast after a while. Your confidence becomes so high, you become bulletproof, invincible, invulnerable, invisible.

    Yes, you do miss that after you are ‘out’. You need that fix like any other junkie.

     

    Then there’s your place in the world.

    A soldier is there to fight, there’s an enemy, a target, a defined adversary. Back in the world, nothing is as well defined or black and white. The only people you can trust are the guys in your ‘troop’, your brothers in arms.

    Same for cops. The only people you can trust when you leave the ‘shop’ are the other guys in ‘blue’. No badge? You ain’t one of us, you aren’t trusted like other ‘bluesuiters’. Once you put that badge on for any length of time, you become different, you look at things differently, you see people differently, you don’t trust like anybody else. You can’t, everybody lies to you.

    Being part of a group like these is different, you can’t truly understand the feelings, the trust, the camaraderie, and he hits on this well in this video.

     

    Do I miss being a cop? More than I can express. Much like most soldiers who get out.

    Do I miss listening to victims describe the rape, investigating fatal accidents, the long hours away from home, missing ball games and concerts, telling parents that their kid isn’t coming home tonite?

    In a sad sort of way, yes. Why? Because someone has to do it, and I could/did. Some people can’t handle these things, it destroys them from the inside out. You learn to deal with the bad things, and move on to the next emergency.

    Then there’s the challenge, the game, the puzzle.

    Like so many other things, it’s the little things that make it worth it.

    The little girl who hugs you after you return her teddybear, the tears in the victims eyes when a just sentence is passed, a simple thank you card.

    I have customers who were/are soldiers, they also talk about the little things. The little kid they gave the puppy to, inoculating and saving a village, and much more.

    Why do so many soldiers become cops? Because of everything I put forth above.

    #15122
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    I often hear here words like” in those time at least I knew in who I needed to shoot”. In present days here, I have feeling that someone is guilty, but not sure who I need to shoot in face :)

    Memories after some time have tendency to fade, and some things are lost, other becoming more powerful.
    While I do not miss those days, I do remember very well moments that made me man like I am today, friends, some powerful moments.

    I do understand point of “adrenaline and your place” words, and I see lot of lost folks because they do not know what to do with themselves when there is no sense, need, and pressure.

    #15125
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Whirlibird and Selco:

    The only time my crew or I did fully unwind was when we were off the clock, so to speak, and we would challenge others like ourselves to games like softball. Of course we were usually out in the boonies away from everyone and everything. Lots of booze to limber the joints!

    Whirlibird: In the late 1980’s I made friends with folks from a local law enforcement department. They had boats and I could fix them. Lots of weekend runs later a close friend was asked who I was. His reply: “Nobody but a Navy Hump!” Very good friend still.

    Selco: It has taken me a long time to cut the strings on a bunch of memories. I now understand that dragging that weight around was killing me. Now when those thoughts start chewing on me I focus on one of my grandchildren’s picture.

    Robin

    #15127
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    They miss war because they are sick mother F*ckers ……….nobody in their right mind likes that **** . I have talked to vets from WW2 ( my father being one of them ) to Vietnam , all say they wouldnt wish that **** on their worst enemy , maybe there is a MAJOR mental malfunction on todays people that they would like that , Just Sayin

    #15171
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    I would not judge so hard on them Tolik, as I said I do not miss those days, but I understand people that somehow have good memories from the war.

    Good thing to remember here that not everyone “war experience” is same, not every war is same. I experienced civil war from the first hand, without too much sense and honor there, with lot of atrocities and senseless violence.

    In short I would like that somehow I passed that experience.

    I am seeing people lost because that experience almost every day, they can not find their place in peacetime, sometimes I am one of them, some of them are completely destroyed.

    Still some of them missing the time when they fight for their life.
    Those were powerful moments, maybe not good moments, but powerful moments, and lot of people can not forget that.

    #15247
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    I agree , that you would find friendships closer than you would on the outside ………….but miss war ? not buying it . Most people I have talked to that have seen combat , say they would  have been better off NOT seeing the **** they saw and did . There is a psychological disorder with people that spent too much time in prison ……….they cant deal with the outside and being 100% independent , I would guess the same is true with people that spent too much time in the military . One of the biggest problems the ex cons have is that they are on their own , nobody telling them what to do , and as importantly , people not obeying them .

    You do need to be deprogrammed from both if you want to get and have a life . When the slaves were freed after the civil war , they had to LEARN HOW to be free , they were so conditioned to every aspect of their lives being dictated to them ……that they didnt know how to be free , function or behave on the outside …………I think there is some of that scenario with cons and some vets , that were in too long .

    #15265
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    It is about knowing your place, knowing what and when to do. Doing your job.
    Maybe we all mixed two topics in this thread- 1.being in army, and 2.being in war (and possible in army too).
    Differences are big.

    #15267
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    But in essence, doesn’t it just boil down to people missing a) a clear, defined goal or mission in their daily life b) the feeling of being part of a larger whole (a team, a unit, a close group or family or service) that is united behind that goal/mission c) the daily association with others that have shared memories and experiences (although many are horrific)? and then, of course, the biggie d) change.

    Who Moved the Cheese was a terrific little book about change in general.

    #17405
    Profile photo of Nitrosporty
    Nitrosporty
    Veteran
    rprepper

    It is not war you miss. It is the brotherhood. I can not express the fact that war is bad news all around. But the fact is there, when you go to war you are not there for the family back home with the comfortable bed and t.v. you are there for those men to your left and right. They nor I experienced anything like that when we got home and out of service. The fact they had my 6 and I had theirs.

    #18174
    Occam
    Occam
    Survivalist
    member2

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Tolik wrote:</div>They miss war because they are sick mother F*ckers ……….nobody in their right mind likes that **** . I have talked to vets from WW2 ( my father being one of them ) to Vietnam , all say they wouldnt wish that **** on their worst enemy , maybe there is a MAJOR mental malfunction on todays people that they would like that , Just Sayin

    What’s your background, Tolik?

    Broad generalizations of missing “war”, or street patrol, etc; are just that. Broad generalizations.

    It’s much more detailed than that. It’s the “little” things, that often occur during or around those events, that cannot be replicated outside of that zone.

    I don’t think you understand this.

    #18181
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Nitrosporty wrote:</div>It is not war you miss. It is the brotherhood. I can not express the fact that war is bad news all around. But the fact is there, when you go to war you are not there for the family back home with the comfortable bed and t.v. you are there for those men to your left and right. They nor I experienced anything like that when we got home and out of service. The fact they had my 6 and I had theirs.

    Its not just that.
    The adrenaline/excitement factor.
    Very few places and things give that bump, that adrenaline fix.
    Being so keyed up you are calm.

    Why do you think cops are so bad for speeding? That thrill of the chase, minus the chase. You go into driving mode and suddenly you’re just cruising at 120, like its 45.

    Why do so many military retirees become “contractors”? The thrill and risk.

    There’s a great line in “Red”, when Helen Mirren says to Bruce Willis, “you just can’t turn it off like a light switch”.

    I recently watched a dope deal go down in front of my shop.
    The adrenaline was flowing, I was ready to go forth and do my job. Except it isnt my job anymore, the frustration was unbelievable.
    I had to console myself with sending cell phone pics to a local uc officer and running them off.

    But for a few minutes, everything was right with the world, the juice was flowing.

    #20400
    Profile photo of feral hobbit
    feral hobbit
    Survivalist
    member2

    Some people are wired differently. I loved being infantry. I miss it. Another thing to realize is people have spent a lot of time training and mastering the skills it takes to be effective in combat. Then to have to start again with something completely different is difficult. And like I said before, some people are wired differently.

    ...it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of that siren till she transforms us into beasts...

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