Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 51 total)
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  • #22445
    Profile photo of Amanda11
    Amanda11
    Survivalist
    member3

    Thank you Novus, I really do hope it helped!

    There were so many things I learned in that time, one of the most important being just how dependent I was on the frail infrastructure in place. This was pure ego that I had to address first. My assumption that everything is going to work exactly as it always has was shattered, and I’m very grateful to have had the experience to set my preparations in motion. I’m not sure why no one else had the change of mindset like I did, but it also became very obvious if some of the “friends” that were there with us knew anything about what we have NOW, they would be the first ones knocking on our door in an emergency. Only sharing with people you plan on including is just as important as the actual preparations themselves.

    My new way of living looks just like “everyone else”, but almost everything I have revolves around functionality in a SHTF situation. In the beginning, it felt overwhelming because I just wasn’t sure where to start. I began with small steps, and worked up from there. Addressing my “shelter” situation was the biggest step I’ve tackled so far: in no way was a third-floor apartment going to work for our needs. Now that we’re in our permanent residence I feel like I’m making so much more progress.

    Friends have commented on how quaint the decorations I use in my kitchen are, and to the untrained eye, it looks like a cute Country Primitive style of accessorizing. Every single item is also fully functional and kept in good working order, from the coffee grinder and French Press to the washboard on the wall. I’ve made it a priority to learn how to use everything as it was intended, and that went a long way to giving me the confidence I needed to take each new step.

    I hope everyone is having a great Monday!

    #22624
    flatlander
    flatlander
    Survivalist
    member2

    Thank you for the write up. I was in NYC when the lights went out in 2003. Since there was no power I had to walk home. It took 5 hours to walk 5.9 miles. I was/am in good enough shape that it would have been faster but everyone was walking home and you could only walk as fast as the group of people in front of you on the bridge. Route at link Manhattan to Brooklyn.

    My coworkers went out and got drunk but I hunkered down in my apartment with some pizza I bought for cash on the way home. Luckily for us the power was on the next day at noon. I was fine and I learned a few valuable lessons but everyone around me learned nothing from it all. To each his/her own.

    #23972
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    Interesting reading, Thank you.
    Here in SA our mini-substations and substations are being targeted in “white” areas. Mostly to try and break down the economy and to steal copper. Civilians from Community Forum patrol 24/7 to prevent power outages that can be as long as 7 days. People do not go into a flat panic, but are used to it. Most people have got fire place, to cook or use gas stoves. People in cities are beginning to put up JoJo water tanks like on the farms. We use water filters daily.

    Petrol stations still hits a standstill, but more from people striking to deliver gas. We are very used to traffic lights being out of order on a daily basis. (incompetent people service the lights or they get tampered with) People take turns at crossings… except for taxis..hehe

    #23980
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Leopard, So glad to see you came back to the forum we had some concerns.

    #24166
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    Amanda11 wrote:

    Thank you Novus, I really do hope it helped!

    There were so many things I learned in that time, one of the most important being just how dependent I was on the frail infrastructure in place. This was pure ego that I had to address first. My assumption that everything is going to work exactly as it always has was shattered, and I’m very grateful to have had the experience to set my preparations in motion. I’m not sure why no one else had the change of mindset like I did, but it also became very obvious if some of the “friends” that were there with us knew anything about what we have NOW, they would be the first ones knocking on our door in an emergency. Only sharing with people you plan on including is just as important as the actual preparations themselves.

    My new way of living looks just like “everyone else”, but almost everything I have revolves around functionality in a SHTF situation. In the beginning, it felt overwhelming because I just wasn’t sure where to start. I began with small steps, and worked up from there. Addressing my “shelter” situation was the biggest step I’ve tackled so far: in no way was a third-floor apartment going to work for our needs. Now that we’re in our permanent residence I feel like I’m making so much more progress.

    Friends have commented on how quaint the decorations I use in my kitchen are, and to the untrained eye, it looks like a cute Country Primitive style of accessorizing. Every single item is also fully functional and kept in good working order, from the coffee grinder and French Press to the washboard on the wall. I’ve made it a priority to learn how to use everything as it was intended, and that went a long way to giving me the confidence I needed to take each new step.

    I hope everyone is having a great Monday!

    My wife also likes the functional country decor. We have a few older oil lamps and certain other things that will be functional in the event of power loss and SHTF. Kewl Stuff!

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #24194
    Profile photo of Amanda11
    Amanda11
    Survivalist
    member3

    Your wife and I definitely have that in common, Undergrond! It was funny how fast I found out that my shiny new cook set, embarrassingly enough from the product line of a chef I saw on television, was absolutely worthless. You can’t clean them properly without a LOT of gentle washing, and you have to handle/store them very carefully. In my world, that doesn’t work: by nature I’m what my hubby calls a “slammer”: I slam doors, cookware onto surfaces (both the stove and the countertops), utensils onto cookware, etc. The shiny set had to go, and was replaced with a very basic antique cast iron and stainless set that I pieced together. None of them match, they all work perfectly, and with proper care should last me forever. My love of functional antiques grew from there, and is not just limited to the kitchen, either.

    My other favorite thing to collect is pre-1940’s Cookbooks and “How-To’s For Housewives”: there is an incredible amount of knowledge to be gained from our fore-Mothers. The best ones are well-worn, and have handwritten notes in the margins with the previous owner’s added-in recipes and tips. I’ve learned SO many skills from these treasures!

    #24237
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    Ahhh, Yes!
    We have quite the collection of Lodge Iron cookware. Great Stuff!

    I can even season an iron skillet, or dutch oven myself! Pretty easy to clean, as well.
    Scrape off the surfaces, with a plastic scraper tool, and wash gently with minimal soap.
    Rinse & Dry! (or even air dry) GREAT STUFF!

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #24254
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I’ve got a lot of Lodge Iron cookware too. Great stuff.

    #25480
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Most people have no idea how to get water or food, or heat from what is around them. My plan is not only to prep, but assess what is around you for future possibilities: Firewood? Water? Game? Wild plants?

    Yes, my kitchen and workshop both have many “quaint” decorations. All functional should things go down. For example, a lot of cast iron and heavy stainless cookware with metal handles so they can be used over an open fire without burning off handles. And I know how to use the old tools/utensils since I did most of that growing up–a long time ago. I cannot believe how many (more affluent) people are going toward “Smart Homes” with everything dependent upon electronics. One power outage and ????

    I SHOULD get to know all my neighbors, but cringe. Most of them in this rundown neighborhood are on welfare and not reliable. We are “over the fence” friendly with my immediate neighbor but not close. She has a child from an abusive boyfriend that visits her occasionally (and throw things around while yelling at her). Know by first names the neighbors down the street but think he is high most of the time. But he does garden… Definitely not ideal, but this is only place we could afford. We do have self defense. So we will see what happens…

    #25483
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Good luck with the neighbors wildartist. I’d keep a low profile with most of the neighbors once you have sized them up, but would first try to determine if there are any good kindred souls there.

    #25508
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Thanks, MountainBiker. From what I have observed, few kindred souls here. Mostly concerned about where the next hit is coming from, no vehicles, scraggly unsupervised children who loudly use the obscenities learned from mama, wandering dogs and cats (Hmmmm….resources….) Yes we would like to keep a low profile but it’s not easy. Everyone knows my husband is in a wheelchair; we have a large travel trailer in our driveway; and I have yelled at the neighbors’ pit bulls who come into my yard and threaten me. Grey-headed but not very good at being grey-man/woman.

    If things get bad suddenly, just sit and defend ourselves. If more notice, we might take the trailer and head for a friend’s property 5 miles away and hunker down there. They are definitely like-minded. We hunt together and the husband reloads along with my husband, often together, casting bullets etc. They have a huge garden space. But, a well dependent on electricity…weak spot.

    When we get back in early Nov from a trip to an art show (need more income) I will make sure the trailer is fully stocked as a BOV. It is already our “hunting cabin”. Yes, we know we’re not in an ideal position due to medical near-bankruptcy. But as my husband says, if you have to go, take an honor guard with you….

    #25527
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Sounds like you are a realist who understands the score wildartist. Good luck to you. A suggestion for your friends is a hand pump for the well.

    #25531
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Thanks, MountainBiker….best to you as well. Wonder where we’ll all be ten years from now???

    #25535
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Ten years from now? A good place to start is that we’re still alive and well. The world not having gone completely insane would be nice too.

    #26098
    Profile photo of tshavor
    tshavor
    Survivalist
    member1

    This was truly an amazing story- it’s been a long time since I’ve thought about running out of toilet paper (among other things), and I’m thankful that you took the time to put your experience into words.

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