Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 51 total)
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  • #21842
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    ” This is part of the frustration I’m experiencing with trying to find a network of like-minded people……it is really hard to trust people nowadays” I know preppers that are afraid to admit they are prepping, trying to maintain security. It’s almost funny because it’s obvious to another prepper what they are doing, yet they think they are protecting themselves by isolation. Expecting someone that is not attuned to the potential future environment to come to their senses is just a waste of energy. Most people think that what we have now will last forever instead of recognizing the volatility and frailness of our world. I share your frustration.

    #21847
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    When our group first started this was what we perceived as a problem but it turned into a blessing. We sat down and talked about families and friends that may have been preppers. Found a lot of us were thinking about the same people. Once that was established one of us would sit down with a prospect and talk generally about the condition of America and our local area. If that talk turned ugly then that person was crossed off the list. If possible additional talks happened and the person(s) was asked to a meeting.
    This may sound strict and formal but it is what worked for our group. There are sixteen persons/families in our group and we are loosely part of a state and regional web of preppers.
    Robin

    #21901
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    Trust is VERY important, in the client relationship and the prepper arena..,.

    Great comments, guys… & Lady!

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #21924
    Profile photo of colin9h2
    colin9h2
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    This was a very interesting read, thanks in advance.

    What I took from this story was that its just as important to be prepared mentally as well as physically, as evidenced in your dispute with your former friends. Also, its good to know the people you live near. A friendly face can keep you just as safe as the boomstick near your bed at night. After all we are only human, and we tend to let our fear get the best of us at times. If the person next door knows who you are and what you’re capable of, they’ll either A: stay away. B: take advantage of you. Or C: Come to you for help and mutual benefits. Speak softly and carry a big stick yall. Great input from the other guys on here btw, I’m really glad I stumbled upon this site.

    #21927
    Profile photo of Ron S
    Ron S
    Survivalist
    member6

    Thank you, Amanda, for your peek at SHTF in your life. It is pretty scary when all the comforts of home are no longer available and you have no idea when things will return to normal. undeRGRond, I used to install telephone systems. On more than one instance, we would be working on a phone system and an employee or even an adjoining business would come up to us and say”What did you guys just do? My computer just quit working and it was just fine until you guys got here.”, even though we were just replacing sets.

    #21953
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    On the neighbors issue, whether they are good, bad, or indifferent, they will be part of your reality come a SHTF scenario. The time to get to know them isn’t after the SHTF. They don’t have to be your best friend but it is to your advantage to know enough about them so that you have at least a general sense of their strengths and weaknesses. Will they be an asset or a liability?

    Two years ago one of my brothers died unexpectedly in his home after going into a diabetic coma. He lived by himself and had lived there for several years. The day after the funeral was over and I had finished tending all of the immediate issues, I went to several of his neighbors to leave my contact info and instructions to call the police and me if they saw any vehicle other than my truck or my nephew’s car there (he lived out of state too). None of them even knew he had died, and it was apparent they didn’t know him at all. Somehow they had missed all the police, ambulance and coroner’s office (unattended death) commotion after he was found following a wellness check. Me, a perfect stranger to all of them, filling my truck with stuff my nephew wanted brought to his place didn’t trigger a “what’s going on” response, nor the estranged wife who was also a complete stranger to all of them being she had never lived there hauling stuff she wanted out of the house before she headed home (also out of state). And this was a very nice suburban neighborhood where I’d of expected everyone to know everyone else. I can just imagine the post-SHTF meet and greet in that neighborhood.

    #21955
    Profile photo of Amanda11
    Amanda11
    Survivalist
    member3

    Thank you for the input, and I’m glad you have all appreciated the account of the Blackout! It was the most enlightening experience I’ve ever had in terms of needing to change my mindset. Having grown up in the Detroit area I was already VERY street-smart, but once I clawed my way up into a successful career I found I had put that “anything to survive” mentality aside to enjoy the spoils of my new life. It was only when I saw how fragile that new life was that the reality of the situation became evident: in a moment, everything can stop. And when it does, it’s up to YOU to survive. I figured out a way to maintain a comfortable balance between the two.

    You are absolutely correct, Colin: mental preparedness is the most important skill all of us can ever have. This might be a lot of the reason so many of us are having trouble finding local like-minded people to band with. Most of us here have had some experience or influence that allowed us to use our fears as motivation to prepare ourselves and become much more self reliant. Sadly, I’ve found out just how much we are all in the minority, since it seems like the rest of the population shies away from that same fear, refusing to acknowledge it.

    #21956
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    MountainBiker, story about your brothers neighbors sent a shiver up my spine. Imagine living in a area like that. Come SHTF you would be overrun by those idiots.
    Robin

    #21959
    Profile photo of Roadracer
    Roadracer
    Survivalist
    member7

    Mountain Biker’s story reminds me how lucky I am. Neighbors all know each other, and by keeping religion and politics out of conversations everyone gets along. Low key neighborhood watch would have people asking questions if strange trucks were parked in someones driveway.

    If you haven’t get out and meet your neighbors. You might be surprised who you find there.

    #21960
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Robin, if the neighbors (and these are probably quarter acre lots so nothing is visually hidden) are so wrapped up in their little world that all the commotion at the house when my brother was discovered, and then in the days that followed, didn’t raise up any curiosity in them, then you can bet they are pretty oblivious to what’s going on in the world. No situational awareness at all. I picture gangs from the nearby city that they’re a suburb of going house to house post-SHTF and nobody paying any attention until they come to their house.

    #22031
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    @Ron S

    Most people fear what we do, and that is fine with me.
    I will educate anyone who wants info, but what we do is a vital and important thing.
    If you fear electricity, leave it to the professionals!

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #22035
    Lone Eagle
    Lone Eagle
    Prepper
    member3

    Where I’m at in the Rockies, we get dumped on in the winter. Last winter, I had 3′ of snow in the driveway, up to 5′ in some areas of the yard. Keeping the roof cleaned off was a full-time job. Ice on the power lines became a real problem. If you didn’t have a 4×4 truck, you weren’t going far until the road was plowed. My stock F-150XL handled it like a champ.

    I, too, am on well water, but have a work-around. I dropped a second line down the shaft, and have a 12V self-priming pump on hand(runs at 45PSI). If he power goes down, I simply hook up the pump, string out a hose, and pump away from a car battery. We help each other in my area, so they know, “have pump, get water”. This fall, I have a natgas genny coming with propane option. Our natgas stations have backup pumps powered off natgas, so at least that keeps flowing.

    Never challenge a man who has nothing left to lose.

    #22106
    Profile photo of Glockerman
    Glockerman
    Survivalist
    member2

    Thank you for posting your experience.

    #22229
    Profile photo of undeRGRönd
    undeRGRönd
    Survivalist
    member8

    Great Idea, Lone Eagle!

    I should look into either a big enough inverter for the pump, or a 12V like you have.
    Getting the prime is a potential problem if the well is deep…

    "ROGUE ELECTRICIAN" Hoping to be around to re-energize the New World.....

    Cogito, ergo armatus sum

    #22415
    Profile photo of Novus Ordo
    Novus Ordo
    Hunter
    rprepper

    Amanda – that was a great post; thanks for taking the time to type it out. Believe it or not, that was probably more beneficial to more people than you think. Blackouts and power outages are a fairly normal occurrence and will probably be experienced by more people than most of the other topics we discuss here. Your story reminded me of a couple nuggets that I’ve forgotten about myself (have an old percolator coffee pot tucked away – or some instant). In any case, great job again – lots to be learned.

    A bit puzzling that the people who had to stay for several days didn’t learn anything from it – I think it goes back to our societal slide toward dependency. Power out? The power company will fix it. Water out? Water will come by soon. Add to that our convenience that we can use useless credit or paper to immediately buy things we need. Take out any of those cogs in the gear and there’s a breakdown – a far cry from a few short decades ago when people had built in preparations for any of these “disasters” (which were more like normal life).

    Much appreciated – K

    Arms discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe, and preserve order in the world as well as property... mischief would ensue were the law-abiding deprived of the use of them.
    - Thomas Paine

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