Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 89 total)
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  • #44639
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    I have always set my plans to live a basic life post SHTF, that means living without electricity-which I have done before and isn’t rocket science, some of my prepping friends are talking about generators and chainsaws(too noisy-attracts too much attention) and solar set ups, I am going for the simple life!!

    British Survivalist.

    #44651
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Solar is a good way to go. Make sure you cover all the windows so no light can be seen.

    #44652
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    THey have solar down pretty good , interactive systems are the most common and easiest to do . Stand alone , takes a lot more doing , and is more complicated by far . I took a brief class in it , the panels are getting more efficient by the year , people dont realize that the moment it hits light , you can get shocked if your not careful when your setting it up . I like solar .

    #44653
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    a prepper friend of mine was looking at solar, what he said was that although the panels themselves might last 25, 30 years or even longer the infrastructure certainly dosent, he meant stuff like inverters and relays the stuff you plug into, I don’t understand half of it but what he says is unless you have a shedload of spare parts because after “the collapse” no more will be manufactured, use it(and anything else you can) to get to a point in time where you can live without it, in other words use what you can use now because it might not work for ever.

    British Survivalist.

    #44654
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Lone’s friend is correct, just think of all the electronics that eventually fail and get thrown away. Most of the time a small supporting part will fail making the whole thing useless. Things like switches diodes and capacitors stop working. Plus if it’s EMP that stops the world, the converters and controllers will need protection. I’m still wondering what wiill happen to batteries. Will they over charge and self destruct?

    I’m not of the mind that I will give up on using electricity or the idea of never returning to advanced manufacturing. Everything already invented and proven can be rebuilt using the right building blocks.

    #44655
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    74, that all depends on the event and the magnitude of same.
    i’m thinking serious EMP coupled with diseases that will explode once the electricity grid and technology goes down, i’m thinking: TB, hepatitis A, cholera, typhoid, and whooping cough, influenza. a lot of these are caused by insanitary living conditions and were rife in the UK cities from the industrial revolution right up until the 1940s and sometimes beyond.
    any of these + no mains water and no food deliveries could result in a decimation of the population.
    “not giving up on” electricity might not be our choice, it might be forced on us by circumstances, having the experience of living without electricity, which most of the population haven’t, will put me and mine in front of the rest.

    British Survivalist.

    #44656
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Lonewolf,
    I don’t disagree with what you’ve expecting, I’m just planning to make it to the other side. After the die off people will restore what they can to make life easier. My thoughts on this is to follow the course of history and start by harnessing water power. Finding an electrical engineer to befriend is probably a good thing to do as well. Buy a slide rule.

    #44657
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    yes, but what if the “die off” is larger than expected, don’t just assume that all your electrical engineers are going to survive, anymore than the police and health workers will, if there is a die off it will affect all types of workers and will be no respecter of lifestyle, income or expertise, it will be across all spectrums of the populations, those that rely the most heavily on the infrastructure will be the most affected by it.
    by keeping to a basic and simple lifestyle, one which I have experience of, i reckon I’ve got a better chance of coming out alive than anyone else who relies on “the system” for their every day requirements.

    British Survivalist.

    #44658
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I had to go back to MB’s first post and see what the thread really was about. What I need to do is invest in something that I can use to generate income now, as well as in the Post Modern Era.

    #44659
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Related to this topic , My grandparents lived through the Great Depression . I asked my grandmother a lot of questions about it before she passed away . They were rural people , and when I say rural , I mean very rural . Arizona still had a homestead act in place at the time . My grandfather and his brothers family found some good land by the side of a mountain , good for raising cattle , with a natural water source . They both built a house on the land and started raising cattle , and were given deed to the land after 3 years . When the depression hit , they were not all that affected , because living that far out , they were already living the lifestyle to a degree . Their electricity came from a windmill generator / battery system ( yes they had them in the 1930’s ) , water came from a well , that was plumbed into the house . As time went on , they started to get effected by it a little more . Raising cattle , they were able to get some of the things they needed by barter with beef . Indeed because of the banks , most people were using barter in the form of goods or from a trade skill they could offer . The people in the cities were by far the most desperate , no work , no food , little hope . THey were glad to have roughed it out in the country , as their life was better in the collapse on several levels . They actually benefited from WW2 , because they raised cattle , they were considered an essential industry , and always had plenty of gas when rationing went into effect . The conditions of the cities they described was frightening , and in modern day , a good warning of what to expect .

    #44660
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    My wife and I lived near Pahoa Hawaii in a beach bungalow for a summer without electricity couple of years ago. Amazing what you can do with solar power.

    #44661
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    I had to go back to MB’s first post and see what the thread really was about. What I need to do is invest in something that I can use to generate income now, as well as in the Post Modern Era.

    Had to do the same, don’t think I’d change my original answer.

    #44662
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Lol, I thought it was a good plan.

    #44667
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    My wife and I lived near Pahoa Hawaii in a beach bungalow for a summer without electricity couple of years ago. Amazing what you can do with solar power.

    I lived on a family smallholding for 12 years, amazing what you can do without electricity, but I cant see many people doing it.

    British Survivalist.

    #45189
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Back to the original intent of this thread, I found the following the other day in a Casey Research free publication on line. VERY interesting, given the source (not an individual or a family, but a large corporation):

    In a move that is sure to draw criticism from the mainstream press, Jonathan Johnson, chairman of online retail giant Overstock.com (OSTK), publicly stated that the company has stockpiled gold and food in preparation of a U.S. financial crisis.

    Johnson recently told an audience at the United Precious Metals Association:

    We are not big fans of Wall Street and we don’t trust them. We foresaw the financial crisis, we fought against the financial crisis that happened in 2008; we don’t trust the banks still and we foresee that with QE3, and QE4 and QE n that at some point there is going to be another significant financial crisis.

    Quantitative easing (QE) is when a central bank creates money from nothing and injects it into the financial system. It’s basically another word for money printing.

    Johnson went on to explain the company’s preparations.

    So what do we do as a business so that we would be prepared when that happens? One thing that we do that is fairly unique: we have about $10 million in gold, mostly the small button-sized coins, that we keep outside of the banking system. We expect that when there is a financial crisis there will be a banking holiday. I don’t know if it will be two days, or two weeks, or two months. We have $10 million in gold and silver in denominations small enough that we can use for payroll. We want to be able to keep our employees paid, safe, and our site up and running during a financial crisis.

    We also happen to have three months of food supply for every employee that we can live on.

    Taking preventive steps to keep family and friends safe in a financial crisis is common sense to many people. But to the limousine liberals in mainstream press who tow the line for big banks and the government, this type of preparation is only for “weirdos” and “conspiracy theorists.”

    http://www.caseyresearch.com/articles/one-of-americas-largest-companies-is-stockpiling-food-and-gold-for-the-next

    Disclaimer: I am not giving a blanket recommendation for Casey publications any longer, since the Porter Stansberry acquistion of the company. It is simply not the company Doug Casey founded and ran for so many years (sadly). But occasionally there are still some very good articles in the company’s publications – this was one of the more interesting ones.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 89 total)

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