Viewing 12 posts - 16 through 27 (of 27 total)
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  • #28505
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Just for some humor, I found this youtube video with John Wiseman about who’s better, Ray Mears and Bear Grylls. Lofty said he would eat them both!

    #28509
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    I have to share this! Here’s Lofty talking about how to test plants for edibility and how to reduce your risk doing this… if you’re in the military.

    #28516
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>c wrote:</div>
    PS: I couldn’t believe how Ray Mears processed his fish. He cut off the head and the fins and tail where all the nutrition is… And what happened to the organs? If you want to get the most from a fish, eat the organs first, raw if possible, or lightly cooked. If there is any roe, eat it fresh or lightly salt for later. Follow with the fish head and the fatty fins and tail. Eat all the skin with a bit of the muscle meat. Smoke, salt and/or dry the rest of the muscle meat. Use the fish bones and any waste for making bone broth.

    There’s a major difference between “survival eating” and “bushcraft eating”.
    The guts in a survival situation, sure. (Okay maybe)
    The guts in a ‘normal’ situation, nope not gonna happen.
    The guts for a soft television audience? Gonna lose your audience unless it looks like it just came off the backyard grill.
    Unless you’re drinking your pee and then they’ll stay and watch the idiot.

    Ever been to a Mexican restaurant and had Chicharones? Chopped pig guts. Disgusting but some love them. The Brit penchant for ‘offal’, again mixed innards.
    Certain items, such as liver and heart are great , the wife won’t come in the house when I’m cooking liver.
    The wife loves gizzards, I can’t choke them down. Ever.
    Sweetbreads? I’ll pass.
    Fish head soup? Great flavor and taste, just keep the head in the pot, thank you.

    Much depends on where you were brought up, and what you are used to eating.
    A local and I were discussing eating jackrabbits last night. He was brought up being told they were nasty and only worth dog food. While I said just throw them in the pressure cooker and you’ve got dinner cooking.

    Fish roe? Raw meat? Depends quite bluntly on what it is and where.

    #28529
    Profile photo of KOS
    KOS
    Survivalist
    member7

    C no problem, not insulted at all. Ray is probably my fav survival guy these days. Ive seen em all, even the new naked and afraid series, i find myself yelling at the t.v. often for that one lol.

    Never be afraid to do the righteous thing, nothing righteous is ever easy.

    #29893
    Profile photo of Vep
    Vep
    Survivalist
    member4

    The initial printing of Wiseman’s original book in the US it had a rant by Wiseman against personal gun ownership and praised restrictions on private gun ownership. It vanished in subsequent US printings.

    #29909
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Wiseman is an interesting person.
    He has seemed very elitist in a number of places, which has always rubbed me the wrong way.
    Any anti gun ravings, would be typical in this area.

    It doesn’t negate the survival information, it does however taint any personal coments he may make, and what he says in videos and in person is taken with a grain of salt.

    #32300
    Profile photo of Portero
    Portero
    Survivalist
    member1

    Picking up on what C said, bush craft is a skill, as part of the name “craft” implies. It is a set of skills learned and practiced either as a vocation from older times, such as hunters,trappers, etc., or a way of life, such as a frontiersmen or pioneer or explorer. Presently, in industrialized, modern nations, it would be more of a hobby skill set since modern life has many luxuries and conveniences. But, in other lesser developed countries, bush craft skills are still necessary as a way of life and survival.

    #32305
    Profile photo of c
    c
    Newbie
    member7

    Even if you are the greatest prepper in the world, at some point all your prepackaged, freeze-dried foods will be gone and your tools will broken, stolen or lost. You will be forced to turn to your local bioregion for supplying your needs. Some people will be lost. Others will be just fine.

    Potero, I think it’s a choice. Some people are gear heads. I used to have “the best” outdoor equipment for my adventures. I was like a tourists in the woods with my bubble of civilization around me. It would have never occurred to me to live off the land. Hell, I wouldn’t even light a fire except in an emergency!

    How things have changed. Primitive skills rock. I’m still learning, but it has been some of the best learning of my life. Learning how to re-purpose garbage into useful tools has changed my life. In the end, I think it just might “free me” from needing so called civilization. Now, that’s radical!

    Potero, I just saw this post by Todd at Survival Sherpa. You might find it interesting. Todd and I seem to be walking the same path:

    http://survivalsherpa.wordpress.com/2014/12/17/when-primitive-skills-and-prepping-have-sex/

    #33726
    Profile photo of Vep
    Vep
    Survivalist
    member4

    IMHO, the best bushcraft book is ‘Naked Into the Wilderness’ by John McPherson and Geri McPherson which was re-released as ‘Ultimate Guide to Wilderness Living’. With these books they talk about long term sustainable living in the wilderness with absolutely no modern manufactured items.

    Mors Kochanski’s book Bushcraft is mostly about using steel cutting tools on wood. It’s a good supplemental book to ‘Ultimate Guide to Wilderness Living’.

    A third book in the set would be ‘Modern Hunting with Indian Secrets’ by Allan A. Macfarlan. It’s out of print but can be found on Amazon. It was re-released as ‘Exploring the Outdoors with Indian Secrets’.

    Both books by Macfarlan are essentially the same book, one was just retitled. These unique books cover hunting the various varieties of game in North America using the techniques and tools of the native tribes, and how those techniques can be applied to a hunter with a modern firearm.

    #33729
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Anything written by Saxton Pope about Ishi is also good reading. Hunting With the Bow and Arrow is one book I liked. Its very noticeable the increase in hunting power today compared to Ishi’s hunting techniques. The indian was a stealth predator until he got a gun like the europeans. Survivalists are learning stealth all over again.

    #33749
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    If we are throwing out books and resources, the main guy that should never be forgotten in reference to bushcraft has been ignored…. Mors Kochanski.

    I was recently asked the same question that is being discussed here. After thinking about it, I described the difference as this:

    In Dual Survival (new ones) think about Cody’s replacement, Matt. While Joe is out doing things, he builds a complete camp with recliners, raised bed, etc. This is bushcrafting. Now think about the guys (except Matt and the old guy) from Dude You Are Screwed. That is survival. Survivalists sleep in the dirt, starve, and have difficultly in finding water. Bushcrafters build a camp next to a water source, trap and forage. Anyone see the episode where the old guy just sat there chilling out on the beach enjoying the seafood? That was bushcrafting.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #33756
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I had to edit the lines a little bit.

    Bushcrafter in the wilderness, no taxes, no debt, plenty buffalo, plenty beaver, clean water. Women did all the work, Medicine Man free. Bushcrafter spend all day hunting and fishing; all night having sex.

    Then the Bushcrafter leaned back and said “Only survivalist is dumb enough to think he could improve system like that.” 

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