Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #5659
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    As preppers and people who are trying to become as self-reliant as possible, being able to build and repair things is very important. Thus we need a whole bunch of tools, some as basic as the hammer, some as advanced as a CNC machine.

    So, what tools and equipment do you have? What are you looking to add to your stockpile? And what do you see as your go to tool kit in a grid down SHTF world?

    This is also for me to get ideas as to things I’ll probably need but haven’t really thought of yet, as I’m sure many of you will also come to realize.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #5660
    vettom
    vettom
    Survivalist
    member2

    I have added old hand tools chisels saws one and two man cross cuts saws plus tools to sharpen . Reloading tools and these supplies also tools for my weapons too.

    #5682
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Well, as have gone through 8 cords of wood this winter and it snowed today, #1 on my list is to get someone to make me this. This guy did a tricky thing and think could get welding shop to make pretty cheap. Want, want, want…
    did I say I want one?
    <div id=”fb-root”></div> <script>(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1″; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));</script>
    <div class=”fb-post” data-href=”https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=289246774563492″ data-width=”466″><div class=”fb-xfbml-parse-ignore”>Post by Sun Gazing.</div></div>

    Hope video loads

    #5683
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Oh drat… will try again

    #5698
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    We go for old-fashioned high quality hand tools, not wanting to rely on the availability of electricity. I am a skilled carpenter and my husband knows many other things including plumbing etc. My weakness is I’m not sure how to professionally sharpen everything. This is a skill I want to learn.

    So our current inventory includes a two man saw; bow saws; hand saws (crosscut and ripsaws); heavy hammers (20-22oz) since I learned early on that if you know how to swing one, a heavy hammer does the work–plus I can’t bear wimpy ones; hacksaws; a meat saw for big game–cutting down the backbone to halve it; coping saw; keyhole saw; brace and bit; various and sundry screwdrivers; pliers, offset pliers, dykes; wire cutters; adjustable wrenches; vise-grips; etc. Weak area: Need a larger inventory of screws and nails in case of limited availability in the future.
    Other needs: extension ladder (we have stepladders), sawhorses; bolt cutters; splitting mauls; axes; sledge hammers. We have hatchets and splitting wedges. It would be nice to have a usable froe to make shingles, too…

    Have a few masonry tools but if we don’t have concrete, they are not much use. Although, I saw ‘cob’ used in India on huts and grain storage sheds. It seems to survive the fierce monsoon rains so I guess it might work here. I hear they use it in England, so would like to experiment. Never too old to learn something new!

    BTW Cob is a mix of clay, sand, maybe straw–in India, they add rice hulls. Use it as a plaster on woven palm leaf huts or brick sheds as stucco. One family in a West Bengal jungle village–even though we did not speak one word of each other’s language–welcomed me into their compound. They even had a large, neat patio area behind the main dwelling paved with cob. PLUS a three-hole stove shaped from it! Like a little volcano stove formed on the patio surface, three burners across, and the lady demonstrated how she burned rice straw in it to cook the meals. Live and learn!

    Other tools are food oriented: American pressure canner; water bath canners; folding volcano stove; food mills for making applesauce and jams; vintage cast iron cookware; heavy stainless steel cookware inc stock pots to boil drinking water if necessary (can use the enamel canners for that also); butcher and kitchen knives; game shears (indispensable for small game and birds); ladles, mixing bowls, spoons, colanders, strainers, etc etc. I go to yard/estate sales and snatch up the old lady kitchen stuff that modern women scoff at. It will still work 100 years from now if you know how to use it.

    Hand sewing supplies; scissors; some medical tools; reloading stuff; garden tools, etc. All hand operated, not powered. Whew, didn’t know we had so much…some of it I can’t remember… The difficult part is we’re always thinking of more. :)

    #5699
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Erm… it’s sort of a lot.

    Full set of carpentry hand tools:
    – Set of Stanley planes, #2 through #8
    – Tongue and groove planes.
    – Radial planes, various spokeshaves
    – Various block/rabbet/specialized planes.
    – Saws – crosscut, rip, buck, dovetail, razor, coping, fret, tenon, back saw, stair saw, etc..
    – Chisels. LOTS of chisels. From tiny 2mm chisels to giant 4 inch wide slicks..
    – Assorted woodcarving tools – gouges, etc.. lots of them
    – Various hammers and mallets. Estwing and also self-made.
    – Brace and bits, eggbeater drill, bits, etc. All the way up to 2 1/2″ auger..
    – Measuring stuff/leveling stuff/plum bobs, etc..
    – About 9,000 screwdrivers/turnscrews…
    – Some timberframing tools – adzes, slicks, various axe types
    – Files. Metal and wood. Lots of them.

    Plus lots more user-made esoteric crap that nobody has ever heard of before (probably) that dates back to the 19th century or earlier… then there’s the mechanics tools for working on the trucks/tractor… then the gunsmithing tools… then pioneer tools (shovels, sledgehammers, pickaxe, mattox, etc)…

    Next up, I have to build a shop. A proper ‘smithy shop. Single phase power. Might or might not rig a proper diesel genny with a big ole tank of diesel for if/when TSHTF. OR, I might get a donkey steam engine and hook it up to a genny… totally depends…

    And if my boy shows promise apprenticing with the blacksmith, he gets his own shop, which is another whole world of tools to deal with…

    You guys have to remember – some of this stuff I inherited, some I purchased, some I acquired along the way, some I was given, some I actually found… it represents a lifetime of accumulation.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #5700
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Here it is- will post in DIY too

    woodsplitter invention

    #5704
    Profile photo of eunowho
    eunowho
    Survivalist
    member1

    How about those old fashioned drills- don’t know what they’re called. Kind of u-shape and you hold the knob on top while going around with your other hand.
    A variety of good needles- not made in China.
    I can think of a lot of basic kitchen equipment but that’s probably not what you meant. I will put a few things here anyway. Water bath canner and pressure canner and lots of jars, lids and rings. Egg beater and cast iron sillets and dutch oven, grain mill, cider press would be nice.
    Euno

    #5712
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    eunowho,

    That is called a Brace and Bits… the older ones are superior to anything made today. The bits are called auger bits and range in size from tiny 1/8″ inch all the way up to massive 3″ wide augers. They make short work of drilling through wood. They are more than worth the money spent on buying a pristine example. The Stanley Braces had a ratchet in them. The bits came in a fitted wooden box, with each bit’s place marked.

    Get one.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #5755
    Profile photo of eunowho
    eunowho
    Survivalist
    member1

    Thanks Malgus, I did find the brace at a garage sale so I bought it for next to nothing. Would regular drill bits fit into it?
    Euno

    #5783
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Malgus,
    One of the bestvthings you can buy to use in a brase is a set of screw driver bits. I have bits for screws size #16 down to #8. The massive torque plus the ability to lean on the brase allows you to drive any screw.

    #5784
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Malgus,
    At one time I use to inspect saw mills. A number of them tried to set up generators using old steam equipment run off their high pressure boilers. None of them ever worked becuse the steam engines weren’t designed to operate at high enough rpms to get usable output from the generator. If you could come up with a steam turbine you would be in business.

    #5855
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    1974t150v,

    I’ll answer this in a separate post. Steam deserves it’s own thread. Not squirreled away in a thread about hand tools… keep your weather eye peeled for it…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #6009
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Always have a flat pry bar , one in my tool bag , one in my truck and one laying under the sink

    #6795
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I am a little like Malgus, since I have been in the construction business for over 30 years. But I am added news tools which Malgus help me find. The Brace and Bits I just purchase on ebay were I got three for only $35 + shipping are great.

    I have so many tools that I really need to think hard to find what I am missing. One important think is buying old hand tools that do what the electric tools do.

    Look at all your electric tools and think what tool would do the same thing by hand.

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