Viewing 15 posts - 316 through 330 (of 351 total)
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  • #47926
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Malgus, a few years back I had bought the Physician’s Desk Reference, 2009 edition, for the same reason, except I paid a lot more than a penny for it.

    Good stuff, MB. My son and I haunt old bookstores, flea markets, antique stores…. we look for books.

    Thought I scored a HUGE find yesterday – saw The Foxfire Books in a cased set of 3. My derp brain shook off the cynicism for a few seconds – SOMEHOW, against all the odds, everyone else had missed this cased set of Foxfire books.

    I picked it up and… it was just the cardboard box the set came in… empty.

    Eh… moving on. :)

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #47927
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    What I do is go to library book sales. Reference type books are few and far between but I have gotten lots of old history type books and classics. My favorite is the annual book sale in my town. For a couple dollars I’ll walk out with a box full. The ladies there like me because I take so many. They’ve even taken to pointing out certain books they think I’ll like and then saying let me get you a box for all that.

    #47929
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Absolutely a great buy. I went directly to Amazon and bought both Physician’s Desk Reference books. One on drugs, the other on herbs. Shipping was considerably more than the books, but that’s okay.

    #47933
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    I suggest you also get a Taber’s dictionary and a Merck manual. If you can find Bates medical exam books get those as well.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #47935
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Sled,
    Thanks for the recommendations. I found them both on Amazon.

    #47936
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    A related prep of sorts is knowing who in your neighborhood has medical training to any degree….doctors, nurses, EMT’s, and so forth. In a grid down or other major SHTF scenario, health care will be local.

    #47937
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    MB:

    Good point, but I would just find out what FMF Navy Corpsmen happened to be available for entry into your group. Here is why:

    * They will be trained about as well as a PA, but will not be on anyone’s radar as being medical.
    * They have had as much combat training as the Marines that they served with.
    * Chances are that they worked with multiple different combat systems to include explosives at one time or another as well.
    * It was their job to do everything medically possible while under the worst circumstances and without any real medical supplies all while saving a life – great experience for SHTF type scenarios.
    * Most had complete medical carte blanche when it came to saving a life so I (for instance) got to do many minor surgery things, intubate, run anesthesia equipment, prescribe meds, see patients as if I was a family practice provider, set up and operated ventilators, was ACLS/PALS/NALS/Trauma certified (same courses that providers take), etc…….

    Other military branches do not have the same level as training or freedom to perform medical procedures as Navy Corpsmen so that I why I tossed this out there……

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #47945
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Sled, that would be ideal but the reality is odds are such a person doesn’t happen to be living in any given neighborhood. In rural areas where even an expansive view of what constitutes a neighborhood the number of “neighbors” is going to be a somewhat small pool.

    #47947
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    There are – to the best of my knowledge – within a 5 mile radius of where I am right now, two nurses: 1 LPN and 1 RN and one vascular surgeon. Also a Vet Tech (in case there’s literally no other recourse, a vet tech can throw in stitches, etc, when nobody else is available a la Hershel from TWD).

    There might be others, but that is an unknown right now. Alas, I am only Combat Lifesaver and 1st Aid/CPR trained. I have never put in a stitch in my life. But, I have had cause to make field expedient splints before. Worked pretty well.

    Many years ago (listen to me.. I sound like my old Da’), the Red Cross used to put out genuine books on 1st Aid. I do not know if they still do.

    The ones I have are:

    First Aid, 4th Edition (c. 1957, printed 1969)
    Standard First Aid and Personal Safety (1st Edition, 1973)
    Advanced First Aid and Emergency Care (1st Edition, 1973)

    All were put out by the American Red Cross. Publisher for all is Doubleday. These books are remarkably similar to the Combat Lifesaver training I received. Except for stuff like “How to treat a sucking chest wound”.

    An aside: Before the advent of the IFAK or Blow-Out Kit, we carried pressure bandages. We were taught how to use them properly and got pretty good at doing the old pressure bandage thing… but, thing is, they only gave us one bandage

    More often than not, bullets make two holes…

    Most of us squirreled several away, just in case…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #47948
    Profile photo of WhiteKnight
    WhiteKnight
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    What I have prepped this week…

    This week’s prep has been of a mostly non-material nature.

    Firstly, I spent time on the range to keep myself from getting too dull on the marksmanship front. All 3: my handgun, my rifle, and my shotgun. Also to keep an eye on weapon functionality. I did unfortunately find my jamming problem in the mini-14 is still alive and well (failure to eject) with the promag 10 rounders despite my sending for replacements. I’m just going to have to bite the bullet and pay full price for factories unless I find used.

    Secondly, I brought along a friend who hasn’t been shooting in years, is a big Christian like I am, and is trustworthy. He already knows about my prepping, as I trust him, and wouldn’t you know it? He’s going to be getting his pistol permit (he was like a kid in a candy store inside the range shop) and I’ll help him get through all the hoops. He’s kind of a “loner,” his family is not tight and they are spread out. He’s extremely fit. Bottom line? I think I just added an ideal addition to my group. No baggage, and a positive attitude.

    Thirdly, I reorganized the material preps and saved space.

    Always on the lookout for trustworthy members. We ran into a prepper at the range. Reason I know? He used the term SHTF while talking to us. Friendly enough, sure, but it made me question his OPSEC discipline.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by Profile photo of WhiteKnight WhiteKnight.
    #47950
    Profile photo of Realist
    Realist
    Prepper
    member2

    White I have had nothing but bad luck with aftermarket mags for the Mini-14. The only ones I have now are factory and they work flawlessly.

    Went up north with a bunch from local agencies and we put on a rifle instructor course. Good bunch of guys and some great contacts. What more could you ask for to being out in the woods shooting a bunch, getting paid and not paying for the ammo. The food at the BBQ was good too.

    Finished inventorying all my ammo. Separated it all out from training, hunting and load out.

    Guys regarding the PDR I have found it is important to pick up the old ones too since the different pills change from year to year. Also for those going looking for this type of book make sure you get the one for prescription types drugs and not over the counter ones. The OTC is not worth the cost most people are selling them for.

    #48008
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I bought a new pair of high quality hiking boots. What’s special is the percentage off they are sold at. I saved about $200 and paid $125 with no shipping fee from Sierra Trading Post.

    #48013
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    Generally i use the term “stocking up” to describe my prepping these days. Or supply run. It’s often obvious now when you see people in the same frame of mind. It makes for some funny conversations. On the other hand if someone buys a bunch of ammo I know I know … Dangerous times. I usually meet people who have the money to spare and it’s easier to understand them. The poor and mental cases really put me on edge. I don’t want to open my mouth and become a target. I’ve also had people try to con me with religion. If I can’t get the point I just back off slowly uttering a few meaningless cliches. They live in their world and I live in mine. I’m not good at running culture mazes so I usually know when to stop talking. Mostly lol.

    #48014
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Canning elk from last year & bought a mora knife and headlamp for our kit in the SUV.

    #48017
    Profile photo of Realist
    Realist
    Prepper
    member2

    It is time to rebuild the mountain bikes. I just ordered new tires, tubes, racks and lights for our older bikes.

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