Viewing 15 posts - 286 through 300 (of 351 total)
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  • #47594
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Update:

    Was in town earlier today and picked up a good addition for the Dry Boxes…

    2 Sawyer Mini water filters. These little guys will filter 100,000 gallons of water – each.

    The filter itself comes with a plastic pouch for water (flat and empty), a straw, what looks to be the biggest syringe in the world and the filter itself.

    I won’t get into the “How to use this thing” because everyone here is capable of reading directions – just know that you can either use it in a manner similar to a Lifestraw, or you can screw it to the top of an empty plastic soda bottle (available just about anywhere on Earth), or you can use it in line with a hydropack like Camelback… and, of course, with the provided plastic baggie.

    It’s tiny, doesn’t require any new filters and according to the directions, will filter 99.9999% of bacteria and protozoa. I chose it over the Lifestraw for two reasons – 1. this is way smaller and lighter and 2. the Lifestraw will last a couple hundred gallons, max. This will last for 100,000. However, I would do everything possible to filter out as much crud as I could before using this thing… just don’t scoop up some pond water and start sucking away… I mean, you could do that, but man… I’d have to be in a bad way to do that.

    Better to filter as best you could beforehand, even if only to improve the taste…

    Cool stuff. Onwards!

    [attachment file=”Sawyer mini 3.bmp”]

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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    #47596
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    bought 3 more packs of bees for new hives this year and made new frames for both honey and for broods,

    #47600
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Malgus,
    Holes cut as Tee’s keep the holes from being to big and are sort of self sealing around your neck.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
    #47602
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    Malgus, thanks x2. I was unaware of the Lexington site, and can see multiple possibilities there – appreciate that very much. Interestingly, that site also gave me a great idea for reconfiguring our rainwater collection/storage system (blue 55 gal drums). Instead of the concrete blocks we’ve currently got them on which puts them about a foot above the ground, the photo of a similar 4-barrel system on that web site, using 4×4 posts to elevate the barrels even further seems well suited for what we’ve got. I can use all the concrete blocks to replace cedar boards that currently make up at least one of our 16 square foot garden boxes (we have several, of course). Those will be much more permanent than the cedar boards (even though those are doing well after at least two years (or three? Can’t remember for sure.). Anyway, in addition to multiple potential products there, it gave me a great idea for upgrading our current system so we can get much better gravity feed of water over to the lower tier gardens just a few feet away. Gonna put in a drip irrigation system this year to maximize water effectiveness while minimizing use.

    Second, we just got our first Life Straw a couple of months ago, and thought we were quite well prepared (or at least a start) for small amounts of water under the most adverse conditions. We haven’t used it yet, but once we did, we planned on getting more. I’ve completely re-thought that, having been unaware of the Sawyer brand until your post. 264 gallons vs 100,000 gallons?!? No brainer! And they’re about the same price each on Amazon. I’d love to have something that would also filter out chemicals, but realize that’s just not going to be feasible with a small, portable filter like either the Sawyer or the Life Straw, so we’ll at least go with keeping out all the “bugs” from the water, and seek out the least-likely chemical-contaminated water we can get if in an emergency situation. Hopefully, our home made Black Berkey filter will be something we can keep with us, which will take care of it ALL. But these are great for the BOB when space and weight are at a premium. Just curious – what kind of local store did you find them in? I’ve never seen them before.

    Thanks much for both!

    #47605
    Profile photo of Realist
    Realist
    Prepper
    member2

    Malgus my thanks too for the Lexington site. If you have ever used the Spector products they are pricey but great. You only buy them once. The Sawyer filters are excellent and should have a place in everyone’s BOB. The price is more than reasonable and the volume they filter is amazing. You can get them on Amazon for around $16.

    #47606
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I floated a trial balloon about buying more land but got shot down. It’s an 11 acre parcel across the road starting maybe a couple hundred feet from my southern boundary. It is not a quality parcel at all but that is reflected in the price. Maybe 4 acres is a hay field and the rest is a river & wetlands on both sides of the river. In colonial times there was a water powered mill constructed of stone on the south end of that parcel. It was torn down in the early 1970’s before historic preservation became all the rage. As it stands now you could put one home on highest/driest part of the property is all with the price being asked being more or less the same as it would be if only the best 2 acres of it were being sold off as a house site. The way property taxes work here is most of the value is assigned to the 1st two acres and then the remaining acreage drops off rapidly on a per acre basis. Being it would be deemed contiguous to my existing property the additional property taxes would be negligible as it would be treated entirely as excess acreage at a very low value, my existing property already having the assigned 2 acre house site. Anyway, my wife said no way, and then thinking he’d be on my side I pitched it to my son who was visiting this weekend and he said not a good idea either. The land’s been for sale for a couple years so its not likely it’ll sell anytime soon so a maybe another day.

    #47607
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    Seems to me a property with potential hydro power post shtf would be very valuable.

    #47608
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Malgus, thanks x2. I was unaware of the Lexington site, and can see multiple possibilities there – appreciate that very much. Interestingly, that site also gave me a great idea for reconfiguring our rainwater collection/storage system (blue 55 gal drums). Instead of the concrete blocks we’ve currently got them on which puts them about a foot above the ground, the photo of a similar 4-barrel system on that web site, using 4×4 posts to elevate the barrels even further seems well suited for what we’ve got. I can use all the concrete blocks to replace cedar boards that currently make up at least one of our 16 square foot garden boxes (we have several, of course). Those will be much more permanent than the cedar boards (even though those are doing well after at least two years (or three? Can’t remember for sure.). Anyway, in addition to multiple potential products there, it gave me a great idea for upgrading our current system so we can get much better gravity feed of water over to the lower tier gardens just a few feet away. Gonna put in a drip irrigation system this year to maximize water effectiveness while minimizing use.

    Second, we just got our first Life Straw a couple of months ago, and thought we were quite well prepared (or at least a start) for small amounts of water under the most adverse conditions. We haven’t used it yet, but once we did, we planned on getting more. I’ve completely re-thought that, having been unaware of the Sawyer brand until your post. 264 gallons vs 100,000 gallons?!? No brainer! And they’re about the same price each on Amazon. I’d love to have something that would also filter out chemicals, but realize that’s just not going to be feasible with a small, portable filter like either the Sawyer or the Life Straw, so we’ll at least go with keeping out all the “bugs” from the water, and seek out the least-likely chemical-contaminated water we can get if in an emergency situation. Hopefully, our home made Black Berkey filter will be something we can keep with us, which will take care of it ALL. But these are great for the BOB when space and weight are at a premium. Just curious – what kind of local store did you find them in? I’ve never seen them before.

    Thanks much for both!

    You are most welcome.

    I’ve been over there a few times – the volume of stuff they have on hand is just incredible. Their website does not do justice. And, believe it or not, I watched them build an even bigger facility right next door to the original one to handle even more cool stuff. Haven’t been in it yet, as it wasn’t operational the last time I was over there…

    Going to post a couple “duh” things downthread re: Sawyer filters…

    Peace.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #47609
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Malgus my thanks too for the Lexington site. If you have ever used the Spector products they are pricey but great. You only buy them once. The Sawyer filters are excellent and should have a place in everyone’s BOB. The price is more than reasonable and the volume they filter is amazing. You can get them on Amazon for around $16.

    You are most welcome as well..

    Couple things about those Sawyer Mini’s… these fall under the “duh” category.

    1. going to dump the rather stiff, cheap straw provided with the Mini and replace it with a flexible piece of water tubing from the hardware store – they might even let me have it for free if it’s leftover scrap. If not, a few pennies for clear flexible plastic tubing is a small matter. Plus, you can roll it up to fit in the dry box and it does not matter if it gets squashed, mashed or bent like the sorta-cheap stiff one that comes with the kit…

    2. Pretty sure these Sawyer Mini’s fit your standard 2 Liter soda bottles. That means: know what you can field expedient? A gravity feed water system. Cut the bottom off a 2 Liter bottle, then punch 3 small holes around the edge. Lash your 550 cord through the holes, then to each other so all three pieces are more-or-less the same length. Screw the Sawyer Mini to the other end, then hang from a tree limb. Fill with water and when you want some, just uncap the Sawyer and let it drain into your cup (or whatever). No squeezing, no sucking, no nothing…

    3. And that means you could probably even knock a hole in the bottom of a 5 gallon bucket and – using the appropriate plumbing fixtures sourced at the hardware store – hook up a Sawyer filter in-line in a section of water line and gravity feed from the bucket into whatever you want… If you have the skills to make a home-made Big Berkey, then you should have no problem making a field-expedient in-line filter for a 5 gallon bucket…

    There’s probably more things you can field expedient, but I haven’t thought of them yet… still, it’s good fun…

    Y’all be well.

    Peace.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #47610
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    MB,
    Seems to me a property with potential hydro power post shtf would be very valuable.

    This. ^

    Moving water is free power – the only thing someone has to do is harness it.

    Hydro power for electric motors/lights or direct power for whatever you want to use it for – grind grains, cut wood, drive machinery via a crude reduction transmission – way back when, the water wheel would drive an axle that would spin a simple transmission, which would then turn a line shaft that powered multiple pulleys/machines…

    Here.. (see attached images)

    Owning the land is only half the equation. The other half is getting the folks together to re-invent the water wheel, build the structures and refit the machines you want to use to belt drive…

    Just an FYI – an undershot wheel is only about 20% efficient. Overshot wheels are about 70% efficient and pitch back wheels are 90%. The trick is how to get the water up high enough so that you can use it for max performance. The ancient Romans figured out how to make water flow up a hill… I might dig out my old engineering books and research this, just as a thought experiment…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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    #47613
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Old mill sites are situated where the height differential in the water course can be taken advantage. Normally a lot of the old infrastructures are intact and should be repairable.

    #47614
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    In this case the original building is just a pile of stones with trees growing through the rubble at this point. I can’t see that there is anything of the infrastructure that survived. It is just that if water power worked there once it can somehow work again. I’ve had a bad cold and splitting headache this weekend and didn’t have the energy to pursue the idea further with my son. He is usually ahead of me on sizing things up and I know he’ll get it if I explain it more carefully. With him on my side I might be able to convince my wife.

    #47615
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    That’s a shame but I’ve seen the same scene over and over around here. On the other hand many old mills are still standing. The water course is usually still there but in poor condition. There’s a nice mill converted to a house close by. The mill dam is broken but if someone had the desire it could be restored.

    #47616
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    If you have the skills to make a home-made Big Berkey, then you should have no problem making a field-expedient in-line filter for a 5 gallon bucket…

    The “skills” involve such difficult things as drilling four or eight holes (depending on how many filters one chooses to use), and making sure they’re lined up. That’s all – literally. For those that missed it in a previous post I did on a rainwater capture system using blue 55 gallon barrels, there was a link to a home made Berkey filter system that I used. I just upgraded the water spigot and then set ours on an inexpensive roll-around shop seat from Harbor Freight. Quite easy.

    http://www.alpharubicon.com/kids/homemadeberkeydaire.htm

    Order the filters directly from Berkey (New Millenium Concepts). There are 3rd party places using the Berkey name that are not honored by Berkey for warranty purposes – including Amazon sources. There’s little difference in filter pricing, so I’m comfortable getting it from the source and knowing it’ll be covered in the first year in case of a problem (there was one bad batch a few years ago, which became part of the reason for the warranty issue – apparently some 3rd party companies didn’t return the bad batch and sold them, and Berkey wouldn’t cover them later on when they were still being sold).

    The price for a pair has gone up a bit (around $109 I think), but for 6000 gallons per pair with filtering of virtually anything you can possibly want out of the water except fluoride, you can’t beat it. We also added the fluoride filters hanging down in the lower bucket (screwed on to the output of the Black Berkey filters in the top bucket). We used a 6 gallon lower bucket (food grade), and a 5 gallon upper bucket. The roll-around shop seat is wonderful for just keeping the buckets out of sight in the laundry room and wheeling the whole thing in for refilling at the kitchen sink (we have a flexible hose extension on the sink fixture making it extremely easy to fill).

    #47618
    Profile photo of Realist
    Realist
    Prepper
    member2

    Malgus,
    Schooled again, I appreciate your time.

    MountainBiker,
    Regarding the hydroelectric. I do not know how much head pressure you have but if can a Pelton wheel works very well. I used to know a guy who was able to get excellent pressure by horizontally drilling into the side of a mountain. The pressure coming out ran a small pelton wheel which powered his entire home and barn.

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