Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 351 total)
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  • #5864
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Unloading a truckload of rotted sheep manure after I finish this sandwich. Great for the garden! Will put any extra as base in one of the compost bins, and also share with a friend.

    #5868
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Poop….. is good!! Nice!!
    I have a question for poop people. I have a pile built up of chicken and pig poo mixed together with shavings.It was started last spring, and hasn’t had any thing added since sept. When would it be good to use?

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #6171
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Good question to learn from! Thanks! Wife and I cleaned out freezers – left over elk and deer from last season and did some meat canning and working on our jerky making skills. Lining up our schedules to take workshops at Institute for the Study of Edible Wild Plants and Other Foragables in Portland Oregon. Starting with ‘Wild Foods in Wilderness Survival’ this summer.

    http://www.wildfoodadventures.com/workshop.html#survival

    http://www.wildfoodadventures.com/

    #6178
    vettom
    vettom
    Survivalist
    member2

    More meds found some in Canada to add to the mix.

    #6481
    Darin Prentice
    Darin Prentice
    Survivalist
    member4

    didnt buy anything this week. i packed for the mountains.
    dakota tundra rig boots with liner, arctic snow pants, and arctic site jacket. insulated cover-alls, thermal socks,
    5 complets changes of cloths, good cond, all buttons..
    2 sets of sleepwear and bedding.
    1 pair of hiking boots
    1 bug out bag in the trunk, hygene bag, general first aid, survival pouch, water.
    1 pre bagged lunch, and thermos of hopefully hot coffee
    1 box with spuds, carrots, garlic, onions, ginger, dried foods, and mess kit.{makings of my home made soup..}
    2 loaves of home made bread.
    1 office bag with landowners, liscense, claims info, legals, I.D. manuals and agreements.
    i already have everything out in camp, just nice bringing extra incase nothings there when you arrive.

    the car…
    check tire pressure, body damage, underhang, oil, brake fluid, steering fluid, antifreeze, loose wiring, conections,
    washer fluid, than turn on ignition and check all lights function, instrument panel, everythings good, third year my kia spectra has been mining with me.
    on empty 40$ to fill, range about 750 km, 150.00 in reserve for gas so i better not break down.
    1000 km from home to claims, about 12hrs.{ i do the speed limit }
    notify partner of my leaving and estimated arrival, route, make info, secondary contact arrangement just in case,
    now tonight i plug in everything to charge, double battery supply, i find myself grabbing twist ties and clips, stuffing rubberbands in side pockets…gotta sit down and relax.
    did i miss anything?

    Prepare, Preserve, Protect...

    #7387
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Good lord, I am stove up (that’s Southern for “I really hurt from lots of physical exertion, plus my back hurts something fierce, so I am going to lay here on the couch with three fingers of bourbon and move as little as possible)…

    Spent the day doing heavy pick and shovel work… had 8 new trees show up for the orchard. Two more Chandler Walnut trees, two more Golden Delicious apple trees, two more european plum trees (I don’t remember the exact names) and two brand new almond trees… and they ain’t teeny. Each one was 5 feet if it was an inch with a big ole root ball. Spent the day digging holes, mixing topsoil, lime and fertilizer and the dirt from our excavations together, then planting the new trees in the orchard. Then hammering in stakes and tying them off so they don’t get blown down and also grow straight. It’s really starting to shape up. Had to measure out where the trees would go, so they’re all dress right dress and organized. Some are self-pollinating, some need other trees nearby, so we have to group them together according to what type tree they are. Our orchard will probably take up a full one quarter of the farm when we’re finally done.

    You don’t plant trees for yourself. You plant trees for your descendants… it is my hope that my son’s grandchildren will be enjoying the fruits of our labor, long after I’m gone…

    Note to self – take truck to farm supply store tomorrow and buy a post hole drill, 3 point hitch. Honest injun I don’t know how many more of them I got in me, and we still got the rest of the trees to plant, PLUS a half dozen more maples, oaks, etc, we’ve been cultivating… a post hole drill would at least do 75% of the work for us – alls we have to do then is just neaten up the hole and mix the topsoil, etc.

    Only concern I got is that the orchard is too close to the road for my liking. It’s not a big deal right now, but we’re going to have to lay in supplies to deny the trespassers access to that part of the farm for when things go pear shaped – timbers for building a proper Cheval de Frise, along with razor wire, couple 50 lb bags of nails, spike boards, etc… won’t stop them from raiding my orchard, but it will slow them down long enough for me to shoot a few of em…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #7408
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Malgus – love ‘all stove up’! Yeah for you planting all the trees, although hard damn work.

    This week was start cleaning up everything outdoors after long, hard winter so didn’t get much prep done. Did manage to star/replenishing the coming winters kindling pile, busting up small limbs, breaking up the smaller stuff as the big cleanup commences.

    #7409
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Some more changes in the firearms collection,
    garden plans coming along (short cold growing season),
    water storage plans coming along,
    more parts for dehydrator gathered,
    grow lights for the herb garden mounted and working.

    Lots of little things that are parts of others.

    #7424
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Set up a new Hornady AP progressive reloading press. After thirty years using single stage presses this is a great addition.

    #7430
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Hey Melgus,
    Your place sounds pretty nice. How many acres of trees will you end up with? You might know this already, but with the use of Rootone you can use cuttings from fruit trees to start new tree stock.

    #7439
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    1974,

    Our little farm is a touch over 10 acres, but the some of the best land for growing stuff is right next to the house. The farm is in a rough upsidown “U” shape, with the land running around the house. It was originally 225 acres, but it was sold off little by little over the years.

    The land next to the house used to be a horse pasture, but we reclaimed it. Tilled it, fertilized it, graded it, tore down the old rotten fence, etc. Planted grasses and then left it alone for a couple years to rest. Started planting fruit and nut trees two years ago, and this last tree purchase, if they take, will bring our tree count up to fourteen. I want at least two more almond trees, and we have enough space set aside for 4 more trees, which will give us an even 20. I’m casting around for something good… that will take up most of the land next to the house. The remaining space will be taken up with our garden, not including potatoes. The potatoes we will grow vertically.

    I did not know that about Rootone… I will have to read up on it. There’s more good land on the backside of the “U”, especially near the fish pond. We were planning on planting the maples and oaks near the house as a windbreak and also down near the pond to attract deer (deer love white oak acorns). One spot I’m saving for an honest to God American Chestnut tree. The American Chestnut Foundation has backbred our Chestnut with the Chinese chestut, which is blight resistant. Ours is not. But, they have an American Chestnut which is 15/16ths American, 1/16 Chinese and it appears to be blight resistant. I want to plant it off by itself and let it fill the sky (have you even seen pictures of those old monster chestnut trees? Absolutely tremendous. I would be honored to have one on my property…). And I’ve never tasted roasted chestnuts… I think I would like to before I pass on.

    Here’s a grand old lady of the forest, back before the blight killed them all… check out how tiny the guys are at the bottom..

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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    #7493
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Melgus,
    Around 1980 there was a reward of $100,000 for a living sample of a mature American Chestnut. All I ever found was some wild ginseng. If you start using rootone you can start more trees and other plants than you can ever plant and save a load of money.

    #8378
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Weather finally more like spring so finally made some progress on a few goals

    -received and sculpted with bobcat soil to make first of several tall berms to plant on top of to conceal view of parts of BOL can be seen from small road
    -finished clearing/cleaning up/planting main food garden after winter
    -began splitting/stacking wood for this winter (used a lot this past winter – unusually cold)
    -added more tilapia to pond to increase numbers
    -cleaned chimney/repointed some brick
    -scored 2 pickup trucks of misc lumber left over from building new house for free for my stockpile. Stopped when passing by I saw a couple of guys starting to throw in to a roll off. They were happy someone else dealt with it. Included 6 unopened packages of shingles (can always use on outbuildings – wind pops them off regularly)
    -practiced sharpening skills – worked on garden tools and hand shears and clippers

    Discovered many muscles forgot I had!

    #8380
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Oh my you were busy Tweva. How high were you able to make the berm?

    #8386
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    1974t150v – this soil is from a pond being dredged. The first berm is a modified, curved L and right now I’d say it’s about 8′ tall. However, by next spring I bet it settles down to be about 6′. I have a few more to make, unsure if the guy is really going to have as many truckloads as he says. So, we’ll see if I can add some/distribute any after the others are done. Stuff planted on them ought to grow like crazy I expect!

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