Viewing 15 posts - 256 through 270 (of 351 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #47396
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    Whirli,

    Love the 8 mm Mauser…. At least I love mine. I have a v24 BRNO actioned one that I picked up in a parts box – 100% original and functional. They thought it was a broken M1 that had been retrofitted with a bolt action… lol

    I went ahead and replaced some of my seed bank with new stock. Amazing how expensive seeds can get… /sigh

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #47397
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Sled,
    Are you buying heirloom seeds?

    #47398
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    Yea….. I am buying the “prepper” type ones that are “dried perfectly” depending on species of seed…..

    Yup -> Probably a marketing gimmick and I am probably overpaying for the seeds, but they are very well sealed up and easy to store. I get a can every few months to replace previous stock just in case.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #47399
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Sled,
    It can’t hurt anything but your pocketbook. I do believe seeds are designed to withstand poor storage conditions though and last a long time when stored well. After all they go through wet fall and winter outdoors and still manage to germinate.

    The reason heirlooms cost so much is, you generally don’t need to buy them again from the supplier. Collect your own seed from the crop and keep enough in storage for multiple plantings. Here’s a link to a chart for anyone wondering about storage times for seeds.

    http://www.highmowingseeds.com/blog/seed-viability-chart/

    #47400
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Dragged and limed the big pastures – 4 paddocks left. Over-seeding them again this year to improve them.

    Finished spray foam insulation of loft area of rear run in – in case need to use it for bug out it will be insulated if cold, Finally got solar panels hooked up in it.

    Finally got tank in the ground for gas storage – hopefully get it back-filled this weekend. Then of course have to fill it.

    Started the next round of seeds in the greenhouse for the garden

    Got apple and fruit trees pruned/lined potato trenches with manure so be ready to plant in March.

    Installed the drain pipes in the wallipini I got dug this summer, This a necessity because melting snow and rain was degrading the hole quickly. Only got the hole dug last year – time ran out. So progress and hope to finish this spring.

    That took all my spare time. Never enough time right?

    #47401
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    tweva, from the descriptions of the work you have done in the past and what you continue to do your place sounds perfect.

    74, I order all of my seeds from that High Mowing Seeds place you posted. I have a lot of seeds bought at different times from different places tucked away. Even if germination rates are less on older ones, at least some will still be good. I figure having lots of seeds is a good way to help neighbors help themselves.

    #47402
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    look for something called seedy saturdays and sundays near you or online. they are heirloom local seeds traded for $$ or other seeds you have. alot of knowledge of local gardeners, a good resource. pennies on the dollars compared to buying from big seed vendors.

    #47403
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I bought a lot of seed after the growing season ended last summer. It was all on sale.

    I spent all winter working on my house. A water pipe corroded through and caused extensive damage to 2 levels of the house. I did all the work except carpeting and kept the insurance money. It doesn’t seem like prepping but having a livable residence is comforting. One of the things that ended up getting done was replacing most of the stem valves with ball valves in 2 bathrooms and the water main. I also replaced the pressure switch on the well. I made an emergency water bail to draw water from the well. Using that will really suc but at least we will have drinking water.

    #47412
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    Small thing this week, but we got a number of additional Food Saver containers for vacuum storage of foods, etc. We’ve learned to love our Food Saver over the years, and highly recommend also getting the canning jar adapter(s) so canning jars can also be used for storage. Half-gallon jars are very handy for many things! Just attach the hose to the unit, push the jar attachment on the canning jar with the metal lid (not the screw on cap, however), and suck the air out! Then screw on the cap just to better secure the metal lid if you want, and it’s done. The canning jars can be washed in a dishwasher and reused countless numbers of times. (We’ve gone almost entirely to wide mouth jars, even in the small sizes, finding them easier to work with such as during filling. You may only want to get the wide mouth jar adapter if you decide to get one.)

    While the glass jars can be broken, unless someone is fairly careless they should last indefinitely. Only the inexpensive canning jar lids would need occasional replacement. The Food Saver brand plastic storage containers are much more resilient, but I’ve read reports of them cracking over time. Thus far, we’ve not experienced that. One canister we like particularly is round and tall, and large enough to store a head of lettuce. We’ve had a head of lettuce store in that container for two weeks, without browning, wilting, or showing any signs of becoming inedible. I’m sure it has lost some nutrient value, but certainly not nearly as much as just sitting the lettuce in the vegetable drawer of the refrigerator. And once we’ve used some, we can just return the remainder of the head of lettuce to the container and re-vacuum.

    If you don’t have a vacuum device, personally I’d recommend the Food Saver because it’s been highly reliable, and even Amazon shows a very good review level. Once you get the hang of it, they’re very easy and rather quick to use. We don’t use their storage bags as much as we used to, but always keep a supply on hand for when it is needed. Oh – and the heat sealer can be used to reseal any number of other bagged products (such as chips). You can’t draw air out of those, but you can at least reseal them simply by sticking them in the front edge of the Food Saver – it’ll seal most types of plastic bags.

    #47413
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    GS, the canning jar adapter looks very interesting, but am I correct in assuming that you need an electric powered food saver in order to use it? My prep activities all assume no electricity.

    I’m with you on the wide mouth jars. Early on I bought a bunch of regular ones but then switched to only buying wide mouth as they really are easier to work with.

    Here is a great source to economically buy lots of canning lids. https://www.lehmans.com/p-2831-bulk-canning-dome-lids.aspx?utm_medium=shoppingengine&utm_source=googlebase&utm_campaign=1108270&zmam=32933335&zmas=1&zmac=1&zmap=1108270&gclid=Cj0KEQiAuqC2BRDVxMSnpa-mhZoBEiQAFta8wVJ2fO5dIpZIQh7gIBmC38BmPptYfiUmatJa3eqQmRsaAvss8P8HAQ

    The reusable canning lids are a bit pricey but I set some aside in case I ran out of regular lids.

    https://www.lehmans.com/p-326-reusable-canning-jar-lids-regular.aspx?show=all

    #47414
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    MB, yes that’s correct. It would require electricity to run the Food Saver. However, we were fortunate enough to get a marvelous little device at no cost to us ($500 retail, but available for less on Amazon) that we intend to use for any number of things. It’s a Goal Zero Sherpa 50 power kit that includes a power supply, inverter, and folding solar panel. I’ve used the Food Saver for multiple items at a time powered by it and the Food Saver didn’t draw down the battery enough to show that it even needed recharging. I don’t know that I would have originally paid even the Amazon $365 price for the kit if I’d had to purchase it myself, but now that we’ve got it, I’m very glad to have it (extremely portable, taking up very little space so it can go in a quick bug out situation and is already loaded in our kits, and it holds a good charge for many months). This way we can use a number of 110v devices that don’t draw too much power from time to time.

    Thanks for the source on the lids (never really explored Lehman’s before – neat place!). That bulk price is much better than what Amazon sells the Ball lids for, and we have a hard time even finding them locally for some reason. I think we’ll also get a pack of the reusable ones too – nice back up, at minimum, though we’ve found that we can re-use metal lids with the Food Saver if we very carefully and slowly pry them up with an old fashioned hand-held bottle opener with just enough force that after several seconds the seal breaks and we let the air in slowly – VERY little distortion on the lid that way. We go through lids fairly quickly now that we use the vacuum device frequently.

    #47530
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Finishing up with emergency supplies for our vehicles.

    These are small(ish) “Dry boxes” that are air and water tight and latch tightly shut. They’re not complicated – dull green color with lashing points where paracord can be tied off – about the size of a loaf of bread.

    Contents:

    2 each small stainless snap links.
    50 feet green 550 cord (“paracord”)
    1 Cammenga button compass.
    5 “wetfire” tinder packets.
    2 Sticks “fatwood”.
    1 Bic lighter, small.
    1 small bottle water purification tabs (good for 25 quarts).
    1 Leatherman, plus case.
    1 Buck 110 folding knife, plus case.
    1 Fällkniven DC3 sharpener.
    2 Emergency flares, red.
    25 feet grey duct tape.
    5 feet photo-luminescent tape (glow in dark tape).
    1 Battery operated strobe-light. (D cell batts)
    1 Small pencil.
    1 Write-in-the-rain pad.
    1 Mini Maglite LED Pro. (AA size batts)
    1 Maglite Solitaire. (AAA size batts)
    1 Lifeboat Matches, British – NATO Stock No. 9920-99-966-9432 (25 ea)
    1 Yellow Otter Micro dry box.
    1 Box UCO weatherproof matches – 25 ea.
    6 AA Duracell batteries.
    2 AAA Duracell batteries.
    1 D Cell Duracell battery.

    Each box has identical contents. They’re not “finished” 100% yet – will probably add some odds and ends before I’m happy. Maybe $100 in small bills, rolled up. Pack of smokes. Street maps covered in acetate. Things like that. But these little boxes are almost crammed full – surprising how much you can cram into them if you buy and pack carefully.

    They’ll be part of the Get Out of Dodge stuff in each vehicle – the GOOD gear is kept in a beat-to-sh*t used German Gebirgsjaeger rucksack… they’re serviceable, just really worn and a dull grey-green color. Along with the contents of the dry boxes, each vehicle carries a military surplus 100% wool blanket, water, some food (iron rations or lifeboat rations rotated every 6 to 8 months or so), small 1st aid kit, box of spare ammo, etc…

    Been thinking about putting a change of clothing in each vehicle – the rattiest, most beat-down clothing we have. Not “unserviceable”, but worn, with old jackets that maybe have stains and holes in them… for camouflage. And if you have to hump some miles, it’s better to have the proper footgear (suitably dirtied-up and “aged” to match the rest of your clothing…). If our clothing does not look suitably crappy, I’ll take a sander to them, then chuck them out in the fields for a few weeks – let them get sun-bleached and rained on…

    My thinking – Bright colors, new clothes and name brand hiking gear will attract attention – the wrong kind.

    But, if you have time – swap out your clothes for ratty worn stuff, rub dirt on your face and hands, toss a run-down old rucksack on your shoulder and nobody could tell you from your average street bum… Inside the ruck everything is clean as a new clock, but nobody has to know that…. and your EDC will probably include at least a handgun and spare ammo, so anyone wanting to accost “that homeless person” might be in for a rude surprise…

    Will post pics if anyone is interested…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 1 month ago by Malgus Malgus.
    #47535
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Malgus,
    I like what you are doing with the emergency car boxes. My thing is to have gear for this wet cold weather. Nothing sucs more than freezing in wet clothes.

    #47537
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Malgus,
    I like what you are doing with the emergency car boxes. My thing is to have gear for this wet cold weather. Nothing sucs more than freezing in wet clothes.

    Hi 74,

    I’m right there with ya in hating being cold, wet and miserable. It’s why I put like 3 redundant ways to make a fire in there – plus dry tinder (fatwood) and those wetfire cubes – they really do work. You can float them in water and they’ll still burn. And surplus military wool blankets might smell like mothballs and naptha and even be itchy, but wet wool still retains about 85% of it heat-retaining properties… plus wool is naturally fire-retardant. It will char, but not burn. Wet and miserable I can deal with. Wet, cold and miserable, not so much…

    Little story about me and cold..

    We were deployed up in the high chaparral of Yakima Firing Center, over the Cascades east of Seattle on a training mission. Weather was mild, so no big deal… easy peasy, so we thought.

    Canadian Express comes howling out of the north and b*tch-slaps us hard. Temps drop into serious minus cold. We weren’t unprepared – we had our sniffle gear – but we were surprised. It went from 40’s to minus cold in a few hours.

    The mud our vehicles were in froze.. freezing our vehicles to the ground. The diesel was gelling in the tanks and fuel lines. There was a small unit “out there” somewhere that needed to get to us, so me and one other guy get tapped to stand out in the howling cold, in the dark, with flashlights – at these crossroads so when the little lost sheep came by, we could direct them to safety…

    We waited… and waited… and waited… hours passed. I had on every stitch of warm clothing I brought with me. There was no cover at all – just these little sh*t scrub bushes. No way to build a fire – and open fires were officially verboten anyway. To generate body heat, I ran in place – careful to not break a sweat. When that didn’t work, I started doing push-ups. But, I could feel the cold sapping away at my strength. After a few hours, I was shaking and shivering like I had palsy… The other guy was a real sh*tter, and bailed out – abandoning me and the lost sheep to our fate.

    I don’t know how much time passed after that… I lost all sense of time. The thought of “COLD!” consumed my thoughts… that, and imagining someplace warm. Even then, those thoughts left as my systems started shutting down and my thought process slowed to a crawl…

    The convoy came around the bend and I flipped on my flashlight, pointing the way. They were safe.

    Mission accomplished, I stumbled through the dark in the general direction of where we were holed up… I saw a dark blob and assumed it was a tent. Tent. Shelter. Maybe warm. I did not give a damn and just walked right in…

    Turns out, it was the Sergeant Major’s tent. He was on the other side of the tent, pouring himself a cup of coffee. Dude turned to look at me…

    “Who are you?”
    I slurred out “Private XXXXX, Sergeant Major…”
    “Were you assigned to direct the convoy?”
    “Yes, Sergeant Major..”
    “You abandoned your post! I’ll deal with you tomorrow – GET OUT!”

    I was hurt… I tried to say “But I stayed!”… but he was so angry, if I said anything I thought he would kill me on the spot.

    I just turned to leave…

    “Wait… did you leave or are you the other guy?”
    “I’m the other guy”
    “OH MY GOD! For gods sake man! Get in here and get warm!”

    All of a sudden, he’s my Gramma…

    “Get this sh** off and get warm! Here, hand me your rifle. You want some hot coffee? Here, sit here… let me get you some coffee… you need something warm in ya.. That other guy is a real turd for taking off… I’ll deal with him tomorrow…You want me to turn up the heater?… “….

    I had been standing in the howling cold and pitch black for almost 5 hours. It took me at least an hour to warm back up to where I was anywhere near 100%… I had no idea cold could be that debilitating. It just sucked the life right out of me. After a certain point, even thinking coherent thoughts became an effort. When I spoke, I sounded completely drunk. Now I knew how people – even the strongest – can get taken down by serious minus cold. Your brain shuts down, you can’t think, you get sleepy… and then that’s it.

    Anyway, sorry for the long “short” story. Gonna go get some coffee.

    Be well.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 1 month ago by Malgus Malgus.
    #47539
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Malgus, how large is that box?

    Wet & warm is usually manageable. Cold is manageable to a point if you are dressed for it. Cold & wet can kill you faster than most realize. As hypothermia sets in your ability to think clearly is compromised, plus of course you lose dexterity and muscle control. Keeping your feet and hands dry in the cold is the most important thing.

Viewing 15 posts - 256 through 270 (of 351 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.