Viewing 15 posts - 241 through 255 (of 351 total)
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  • #45479
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Following 74’s prompting on cross cut saws, I figured I want to keep chainsawing for as long as I can. Bought 3 spare chains for each of the chainsaws, a couple gallons extra of chain lube and lots of the mix that you add to gas for the gas-oil mix. I’ll still pick up a cross cut saw when I figure out what to do there but the chainsaw supplies can’t hurt.

    I also started reviewing trail cams and plan to buy myself a couple for Christmas. I figure come SHTF it would be good to know if anyone is lurking around on my property at night.

    #45480
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Good preps MB!
    Years ago I had fairly nice two man saws and sold them as antiques, now I’m wishing I never sold them. Reminds me a bit of what happens when you sell a gun you bought because you liked it so much. Auugh.

    I was out to cut firewood with my 30 year old chain saw. Wouldn’t yaknow the chain broke after about a minute of sawing. None of the local outlet’s carry the chain that fits my saw. I had to order the chain on line, and I’m waiting for it to show up.

    MB,
    You can buy a very servicable used saw. Inspect the handles and fastenings making sure they are in good condition and tight to the blade. The blade should be straight and free of bends and twists. The teeth should be full size with good consistaint shapes and same for the gullets between the teeth. The tops of the teeth and rakers should be straight with no teeth sticking up or lower then the rest. Here’s a link to sharpening crosscut saws: http://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/crosscut-saw-sharpening-zmaz79ndzraw.aspx

    #45489
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Here’s another prep to consider. Cast iron cookware. I have a lot of Lodge brand cast iron made right here in the US so no worries about what contaminated junk might be in it such as might be the case with cast iron made in China. What prompts this thought on cast iron is yesterday I stopped by the farm that had the fire on Tuesday. Literally the only thing salvaged from the old woman’s home was her cast iron cookware. I had been thinking I might buy her a new cast iron pan on account I know that’s all she’ll use and then I saw her cast iron cookware pulled from the rubble. Her son told me they were also amongst the very few things salvaged from her previous home that burned 15 years ago after lightening hit it. The nice thing about cast iron is cooking on an open fire post-SHTF isn’t going to harm it like a lot of more modern/stylish cookware would be. Your basic stainless steel stuff isn’t going to hold up long if used that way.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 10 months ago by Profile photo of MountainBiker MountainBiker.
    #46841
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    This week I bought a Franklin Arsenal Trim & Case Prep. I was at my local shooting range a few days back talking about reloading with an other member and he mentioned the Christmas present given to him by his kids. After he described how it worked I looked them up online and bought one that day. The machine takes care of the four most tedious operations when reloading with ease. Trimming, deburring, chamfering, and primer pocket cleaning. Trimming is no harder then using a pencil sharpener, deburring and chamfering the same. Cleaning primer pockets only requires one hand movement to switch ends of the case. I am able to process and complete all 5 operations on about 100 cases in 1/2 hour, without wearing out my fingers twisting little bits.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
    #46868
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Sounds like a good purchase.

    Here is something I did. Most would not consider it a prep at all, and perhaps a waste of money but of late I have been searching out any buying a bunch of books that relate to our family history, both mine and my wife’s. A number of them have been published family histories that include much about the lives of individuals and the times they lived in. Others are person-specific or instead are the history of a place or a point in time that are relevant to our family.

    For example last night I ordered a book on the Battle of King’s Mountain that was published in 1881. A number of my wife’s ancestors fought there, and in the manner of books published long ago it provides far more detail at 612 pages than a more contemporary book would. I also ordered a more recent book (1995) about one specific ancestor of hers that met his personal Waterloo at King’s Mountain.

    Many of the books I’ve bought have been reprints as I want the data, not the antique value of buying an original. This is something I have done for many years when I bumped into something relevant. What’s changed of late is that I am seeking out such books proactively.

    I’ve also been picking up more newly published history books, and also from library sales more used history books that are practically free.

    Why am I doing this? In a world slowly going crazy (or rapidly depending upon one’s perspective), I am thinking perhaps my kids and grand kids might someday draw some strength understanding where and from whom they come from, especially if they understand the history and what their ancestors had to overcome or go through, and to a lesser extend just general history so as to understand other times and people. Yes you can look up just about anything on the internet now but will that always be the case?

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by Profile photo of MountainBiker MountainBiker.
    #46873
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    MB, though this isn’t specifically family history oriented, in case you’re interested in American history I cannot recommend strongly enough a series of 12 volumes of history that was published in 1925 by the “Americanization Department” of the VFW, shortly after WW1. It is titled, simply, America (alternately AMERICA Great Crises In Our History Told by Its Makers). It is the most incredible history series I’ve ever seen anywhere on the US. It is, to the maximum extent possible, based on actual source documents, which are heavily included throughout, and covers the period from 1000 – 1925 (yes, that’s one thousand A.D. – not a misprint). You’ll never find some of the gems in that series anywhere else, I suspect. Some versions were created with a presentation page bound into the front of volume 1 that dedicated the book to a specific person from the giver. I learned from the VFW that it was originally a fund raiser at the time, but even they have very little information anymore about the series (sadly surprising).

    My set came to me after my grandfather died. He had it produced as a present for my grandmother, not many years after they were married, and it appears that most of it had never even been read – it just sat on the shelf for show, I suppose. Surprisingly, even though living with them for a while as a kid, and being in their home many times per week for most of my childhood, I do not recall ever having even seen it. Why they never encouraged me to read it, I have no idea. Maybe it was boxed up somewhere, and my mother just found it among their personal effects when he died, but I never knew of its existence until it was given to me several years ago. It’s even more surprising because I heard the stories about my grandfather working for Thomas Edison shortly after he came back from the war, and frequently saw (and handled) old ½-inch thick Edison records, among other priceless items that were given to my grandfather by Edison in subsequent years (all “stolen” by a member of his 2nd wife’s family after he died, sadly). There were priceless historical things that he acquired in his early years during WWI while deployed to Siberia as part of the American Expeditionary Forces, and then during his time working for Edison himself in the lab. All that disappeared at his death before my mother and her sisters could get down there. Fortunately though, this 12-volume series and a couple of other things that were apparently overlooked (or just not deemed important) were still among his possessions, and I was fortunate enough to get some of them (including an unpublished 26 page, typewritten manuscript about his experiences in Russia that you cannot find such insights anywhere else – incredible).

    My copy of the history series would not be for sale at any price, from me, and is merely in the possession of one of our kids because those grand kids are the ones most likely to appreciate it. Plus, when I die, I don’t want it overlooked for what it is and just sent to Salvation Army or something (or just thrown out because it’s old despite the condition).

    The neat thing is, I just saw that it’s available even on Kindle, if you don’t necessarily mind not having a physical book to put in your hands. Starting immediately in volume 1, you’ll learn about the first people to find their way to the “new world,” probably as far as the NYC area, around 1000 AD. And it continues on in exquisite detail to 1925 (when it was published). You’ll pay close to $100 (much more if in good condition and the better version of it with the presentation page bound in) for the hardbound series. But even that nearly $100 would be well worth it – just over $7 per volume (I saw two sets on Amazon for $85 – NOTE WELL that the $50 set is missing two volumes, so click to see the other two sets – they’re all 12 volumes). I cannot recommend it highly enough.

    http://www.amazon.com/America-great-Crisis-American-History-Makers/dp/B00QH8BU1W/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1453939342&sr=8-8&keywords=America+VFW

    The Kindle versions are only $2.99 per volume, or free to read if you’ve got Kindle Unlimited, at:

    http://www.amazon.com/America-Discovery-Exploration-AMERICA-History-ebook/dp/B004KAA9P2/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1453939342&sr=8-2&keywords=America+VFW

    #46878
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I ordered that set of books. $85 plus $3.99 S&H. Based on old books I have bought in the past that is a very good price. This will just exacerbate my shelf space problem because they’ll need to get a good spot. I had shelves built in 3 rooms but even then I only have half the shelf capacity that I had at the old house. I did clear out some low value (to me) books when we moved and boxed up maybe 50 years worth of National Geographics but with acquisitions since then I need more than twice the capacity I have just for that which deserves shelf space. The overflow is in bookshelves in the basement, and even they are at capacity. I wonder if my wife would notice if some of her books disappeared…..

    As an aside my favorite set of books is a set of Americana Encyclopedias from 1958. They are totally outdated on matters of science and politics of course but they contain far more historical and geographic detail than you find in modern sets. I frequently use the State maps in them when working on genealogy because they are so detailed.

    #47318
    Profile photo of Corvus
    Corvus
    Survivalist
    member4

    Helped a close friend/buddy to go get with my truck many pounds of liquid soaps, salt, sugar, nuts, rice, olive oils, leather work gloves, Toilet paper, batteries, first aid, and 32 gallon galvanized can with lid for rodent-free storage. Plus exchanged discussion points on the current economic trends, especially as it applies to silver and gold mint. We need to encourage our survival buddies.

    #47321
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Sounds like a productive venture corvus. I struggle with how to get such discussions going.

    #47327
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    Corvus, though I’m not an electrical engineer or physics major and therefore can’t personally vouch for it, I’ve seen quite a few seemingly credible sites that claim your 32 gallon galvanized can, with the lid on it, also constitutes an effective Faraday cage, meaning protection for electronic devices in the event of an EMP. You might consider having a backup radio, or maybe even a pair of CB or similar type hand-helds in there just in case. They don’t take up much room, and if a real EMP hit and wiped out the grid for quite a while, a pair of communication devices, along with a good AM/Shortwave portable might be nice, since presumably someone would still be on their air, somewhere in the world, and you’d have a better idea of what was going on overall. Our Sony ICF-SW7600GR takes up almost no space at all. If the galvanized can protected it and a pair of hand helds, that could be wonderful. Just don’t forget batteries and perhaps a device to recharge them. Sunlight is always free.

    Good planning!

    #47329
    Profile photo of Realist
    Realist
    Prepper
    member2

    Lots of reloading, 30 cal carbine, 270, 30-06, and 308.
    Cleaned out the planting boxes for planting. This will give us about 800 sq feet to plant. I will be making at least six more boxes, out goal is 1,000 sq feet.
    Planted tomatoes in the window box. We also are tending our asparagus which will give about 20 pants.

    #47391
    Profile photo of Corvus
    Corvus
    Survivalist
    member4

    One of the more interesting lunch time discussions happened when the company nurse sat at our lunch room table and we started chatting about surface stuff, the weather, musical pop culture. We then we touched on the jittery conditions developing where terrorists are making civil life a thing of the past. She leaned in and told me that her brother who is a newly retired military officer shared over this past Thanksgiving dinner, he knew that a serious issue was brewing and that he would want his family to start buying more food and bottles of water, and keeping money in the house, medicine, full gas tanks so they could get as quickly as they could to his big brick home with a gate all around it. She didn’t say “what it was” but that it could be grid related she hinted at. I occasionally do start asking her about anything “else,” she just says we all need to get right with the Lord, and she just moves on to how she wants to learn more about gardening, etc. It small conversations like this that makes me think people are seeing a threat developing–and that means more are waking up.

    #47392
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    With all the developments of near crisis events and conditions across the globe it’s a wonder to me that everyone is not aware of an impending catastrophe.

    There are numerous cyber attack maps tracking real time attack;

    https://www.checkpoint.com/ThreatPortal/livemap.html

    Just watching how many are ocurring would lead you to believe something major is going to stop working.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 8 months ago by Profile photo of 74 74.
    #47394
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    Corvus, thank you for that input. I believe you are right, that there are still some additional people “out there” who are thinking in the same direction. And the position of her brother is highly consistent with other things I am aware of. It’s called “a word to the wise.” Thanks for sharing that word. It’s reinforcing and instructive.

    #47395
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Got hunting licenses bought!
    If nothing else, this fall we will have a freezer jam packed with venison.
    Can’t throw a stone here without hitting a doe or two.
    Last year it wasn’t finding them, but choosing which one to shoot that was the problem.
    Between the kids and us, we’re looking at 300+lb of deboned meat from deer alone.
    Then there’s the antelope and elk…… Gonna need a bigger freezer.

    Going to need more dehydrator trays and vacuum bags before then.

    Picked up another 1000+ .40 cases thanks to local LE, I love it when they use our range.
    A: I get to keep the brass
    B: I get to shoot with them

    Got the plans for the kids AR’s finished. My new one (replacement) is almost done.
    Loaded a bit more 8mm Mauser, need to get around to bedding the stock soon as it warms up a bit.

    The ‘new’ garden plans are coming along, but with another 2″ of snow last night, it may be a while before I see the grass let alone start gardening.

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