Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 351 total)
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  • #4768
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    For us it was set seven goose eggs in the incubator.
    Began setting the veggie and marigold seeds in the containers the girls have picked out. This is all being done in the house.
    I canned twenty chubby quails.
    I have ordered the water filters and spigots for the fake berky water filter we are going to build.
    And I have begun to start crocheting a rag rug for the camper floor.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #4775
    nlouise
    nlouise
    Survivalist
    member4

    This week?
    I have a couple of flats of strawberries to dehydrate.
    I’m going to dehydrate several dozen chicken eggs tomorrow from the ‘girls’.
    Going to get composted dirt tomorrow for the garden area by the scoop load from a local nursery.
    Going to begin the garden tomorrow.
    Making a rag rug for the bathroom.
    Making an area rug for the living room with latch hook grid and fleece strips. (probably take a year to finish)
    No canning this week. Need a break.

    #4776
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    nlouse care to explain how to do the dehydrated eggs. I tryed and they came out orange and tasted like grit.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #4780
    nlouise
    nlouise
    Survivalist
    member4

    Yes, hard boil them. Peel the shells off, Separate the white from the yolks. Mash the whites real good with a potato masher otherwise they come out like stones. Dehydrate them, and lay a gallon Ziploc baggie or something on your dehydrator shelf underneath so they don’t fall through the grid. When they are finished dehydrating put the whites in your blender and blend it to powder. Now you have protein powder. Keep the white and the yellows separate. Yellow part can be added to different foods to, like in baking to make things moist.

    #4793
    nlouise
    nlouise
    Survivalist
    member4

    I forgot….take your shells and grind them in a blender into a powder. You can mix the powder with your garden soil or you can put the powder in sealed bag for when SHTF. Later when you have no calcium supplements mix that egg shell powder with water, then strain out the eggs shell through a cloth. The liquid is your calcium supplement.

    #4794
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    This week?

    Disassembled, degreased, lubed and reassembled a half dozen drum magazines for the Suomi, along with a dozen stick mags. Broke the Suomi down, cleaned it, lubed it, put it back together. Need to find a better sling for it. What it has is serviceable, but rough. Typical wartime production.

    Will order a case of 9mm +P ammo tomorrow, along with a way to carry these magazines… probably hunt down a British mag pouch for their Sten gun and a WWII US musette bag for the drums. Maybe a Thompson SMG mag bag…

    My Suomi and various pouches, etc..

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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    #4839
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    I did not really store anything new, but I scout few new “secret stash” places, and find one new alternative route to my BOL.
    I think that counts too.
    :)

    #4841
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Having to stay close to house due to very ill, elderly family member but managed to:
    plant potatoes (yes!), onion sets and cabbage (unusually late/slow start to spring here)
    inventory and check food stores/pantry after long, unusually cold winter and note what needs restocked
    inventory and check medical supplies same as above
    move first compost load made from rotted hay/straw to main garden
    start fresh batch of compost going in cattle trough
    begin inventory/clean up and inspection fresh batch of old hand tools bought cheap at estate sale
    planted 6 more dwarf fruit trees

    that’s about it. Couldn’t leave house for long at a time. But it was something.

    #5027
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Hey tweva,

    When we bought this little farm, we reclaimed an old pasture. It was full of rocks and weeds, overgrazed. Useful for just about nothing. We tore down the fence, nuked the weeds, got rid of the biggest rocks and then plowed the field. Put loads of fertilizer on it and a couple dump-trucks of fresh dirt on it too. Planted good grasses, like fescue, bluegrass, alfalfa, some clover (for the rabbits) and then started planting fruit and nut trees. Made a little orchard out of it.

    The place we got our trees was called Trees of Antiquity. They’re in California, but ship anywhere. They carry only the oldest, purest strains of trees – all heirloom. Loads of historical fruit and nut trees, some dating clean back to pre-Roman times (the trees’ lineage is that old, not the actual tree). We’ve got some nice European plum trees, some nice variants of apple trees that date to the early 19th century and two variants of edible walnut trees. They’ve got everything! Might want to check them out.

    http://www.treesofantiquity.com/

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #5034
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    Doing a little more planning for the garden. Hopefully spring will soon, well, spring up. I’ve been looking at getting a new shotgun as of late, most likely going to go the cheap route and get one of the Chinese knock-off 870’s. From what I’ve researched and have been told by owners, they’re great. Like all the ChiCom knockoff guns, the finish isn’t award winning, but they work great and that’s good enough for me.

    Specs: “Barrel Length 12.5″
    12 gauge x 3″
    Capacity: 4+1
    Ghost Ring Sights
    Interchangeable Screw-In Choke (MOD)
    NON-RESTRICTED”

    For $320 bucks (with free shipping also!), I’m alright with that.

    With this flu I have I can’t really do much else other than read and research.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #5118
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    Recce’d a new hunting area, replaced some worn down equipment, checked all the medicine expiration dates in my kits and replaced where necessary, confidence checked my rifle zeros as I haven’t shot in a few weeks and purchased some tinned goods and sweets that were on sale :)

    #5156
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Thanks for the link/info Malgus!

    I don’t know if you have stink bugs (brown marmorated) (sp?) that are invading/spreading everywhere…they have been a real problem around here for the vineyards and orchards. Hit here about 3 years ago. I went to dwarf trees because it is easier for me to protect them from the darn things.(Another DIY thing had to figure out) There are two old but producing apple trees here that I may as well cut down. You think everything is going fine then as apples grow the spot where they stuck their sharp mouthpiece in just starts turning the entire thing to mush. Trees are too big for me to me to work myself safely. (Note to self repair orchard ladder!)

    Anyway, in my enclosed garden I did get the wire/trellis structure up last year as I want to espalier fruit trees all the way around it eventually. My grandfather used to do this and taught me. I’ll check out that site tonight as I want to order some more.

    If you ever have some more overgrazed stuff or problems with compaction you might want to try Tillage Radish from cover crop solutions. When I bought this place several small pastures/turnouts were just so overgrazed/compacted (used to be horse farm) – and, well I can’t be everywhere do everything. But I needed to start doing something about them so they would be ready when I got to growing on them. Lots of no till farmers using them. They put down hugely deep roots, help break up soil, then they die/rot and leave nice, loose ‘holes’ so water and air can get in; and fixes nitrogen in the soil. Sounded good to me. I am all for a little less work. What the heck – tried it. I took a small tow behind spreader I got at yard sale, hooked to ATV, dumped in a bag of lime (we have clay here) and 50# bag of the tillage radish. Mowed it to keep grass in check until the radish were obviously taking hold very well – then left it. Grew like crazy and green as I’ll get out. Kept growing until late fall some in to December. Stayed green as heck. It takes a couple of killing frosts (not just one or two) and a clothespin for your nose. (they stink like heck when you have a small pasture full all rotting). Used same get up and seeded timothy and orchard grass that spring…thick, good grass. Did it for one more year, but planted (well..broadcast) in August. Looks great. Now to decide what to grow there!

    #5179
    bushrat
    bushrat
    Survivalist
    member4

    Finished planting another section of the garden and purchased another 1000 rnds of .22LR and another 500 rnds of once fired 9mm brass. Always looking for new ways to secure our location because we will not be bugging out.

    #5727
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    I made a new paracord handle for a knife. You wind the cord around and get it tight. Instead of leaving it natural I took brush on superglue and glazed it over. I don’t think it’ll loosen up now. So besides cuts I now have another use for SG.

    #5857
    Profile photo of libbylindy
    libbylindy
    Survivalist
    member4

    We continue to work on building the outdoor kitchen that I will use as a summer kitchen and canning kitchen. No sense in heating up the house in the hot, hot summer of Texas, then trying to air condition it back down to livable. We will move cooking outside where it sits right next to the garden…and the chickens just a stone’s throw away. It is a huge project and one that won’t be done quickly but we will continue to make progress.
    The plants that are in the ground continue to need water. The potatoes got a huge layer of straw around them to help keep the ground cooler. They are growing like gang-busters. The inside pots of tomatoes, jelly melons, peppers, eggplants, roselle, and poppies need continual attention and the outside plants are getting their attention. There are the raised beds I am in the process of weeding and preparing for planting in a few weeks.
    That just about does it for this week.

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