Viewing 15 posts - 151 through 165 (of 171 total)
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  • #24829
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Today – if I can gather the energy after appropriate caffeine consumption – I have a bunch of chores to finish before I get back to ‘work’ for my business:
    -drag 3 paddocks/turnouts
    -move the smaller logs to splitting area from big huge oak that fell in last storm (pictures below with comments above)
    -paint and clean up outhouse for winter (pictures and info in another post/topic)

    Then back to computer work (this is just a break from chores!)

    First pick shows just part of the mess this huge old pin oak left after last storm (has to be fenced off so horses can’t get out or hurt themselves in the big pit the root ball left)
    Second shows part of the mess/give u an idea of size of tree. My friends cut the huge trunk and helped chain up the limbs etc. Yesterday I cut off all the smaller branches and burned them in the pit where the root ball was
    Third shows the stump attached to the root ball slowly burning (still!) on the inside. I figured I’d burn as much off and out as I could before trying to move and dispose of the ******)
    Fourth – close up of inside of another/rotted portion burning

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    #24834
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Well…pics loaded otu of original order – u will have to figure out

    #24873
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thanks tweva. Yes I had problems with tomatoes. The leaves yellowed and the tomatoes were small. It was getting over 100 degrees in there and so just too hot. Tomorrow I have to go in to the office, which is south of here down in MA, and I will ask the Facilities guy what % shade cloth he uses at the company. One of the buildings is essentially a 70′ high greenhouse that serves as a passive heating system for the offices in it. So as to reduce the air conditioning costs they have a shade cloth on it all summer.

    #25114
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Today is serious manual labor day. Already have the steak and salad in the fridge next to a bottle of wine to celebrate when it is over.

    1) finish the high tunnel with help of 2 friends then
    2) deal with the mess the power company left along the road in front of my property! Came home to find 11 trees chopped down (they were not little), the trunks cut in unmanageable 5 ft lengths (dealt with that last evening) and 2 HUGE piles of fresh wood chips – and a swath through the trees looks like a tornado came through. Am I a happy camper? Especially since all but 2 were pines I can’t even use for wood to heat with! I’ll try and remember to take a few pics

    Wish me luck – and have some fun for yourselves!

    #25138
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Tweva, I am thinking of building a “tunnel.” My new place has concrete hard ground. Where would I find “how to” or hints? Thanks.
    Robin

    #25400
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I made apple cider today for the first time today, just 8 half gallon glass jugs worth. Now will be my experiments. I am in process of pasteurizing two jugs so as to see how long they last vs one that is just being kept in the frig unpasteurized. Two of them I am going to process into hard cider and the last three I’m going to try and make vinegar with.

    My garden got rototilled today and leveled somewhat to deal with a couple low spots, and then I went on rock patrol picking out stones. He’s going to take another pass tomorrow so there will be another crop of stones. In New Eng;and there is always another crop of stones……

    #25405
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Hence all the rock fences and buildings.

    #25421
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    We also have lots of stone around here – lots of quartz. When get a bunch together and need to restock the spare gravel pile I take it to the stone yard and they pulverize it for me. Then I add it to the garden. Lots of minerals in it. I did an experiment once. Placed a line of rocks all around the perimeter of a bed and down the center that I was putting under a plastic covered hoop to prevent frost damage/extend season (pre-greenhouse/high tunnel). The stones did a fairly decent job of retaining heat enough inside there from the daytime to raise the temp inside a degree or 2 – compared to the bed next to it with no rocks.

    What Am I Up to Today?

    Soon as it stops raining, going to go back out and finish the last bit of dredging of one of the pond inlets (from spring), stack a new load of wood split yesterday from the huge oak that came down, move the horses about and reseed one of the turnouts with tillage radish and annual rye mixture. Then it’s back to the computer and money generating work.

    #25424
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    How correct you are Whirlibird. Every time I am dealing with stones in the garden or in any hole I am trying to dig I think of the farmers in centuries past who had to deal with the big stones surfacing in their fields. Many of the stones in my wall could only have been dragged there by oxen. The corner stones marking property boundaries are often the really big ones, though what most amazes me are the sizes of some of the stones you find in the foundations of old barns and houses, and of the effort it would have taken to get them in place. For us modern day folks however, the old stone walls that are everywhere are part of what makes New England so beautiful.

    #25431
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    MB: The same applied in areas of Iowa.

    #25433
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Lots of stones in Iowa? I didn’t know that. I’ve never been there but have always had this vision of Iowa being mostly rich flat farmland, the kind of place that New England farmers headed to after abandoning their farms here in the mid 1800’s.

    #25435
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    It is fairly flat, glaciers will do that.

    But when they recede, they leave all kinds of stuff behind.
    20′ boulder in the middle of nowhere for example.

    http://www.iptv.org/IowaPathways/artifact_detail.cfm?aid=a_000634&oid=ob_000132

    #25437
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Come on Whirly Mtb has the right version. One rock doesn’t make it rocky.

    #25441
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>74 wrote:</div>Come on Whirly Mtb has the right version. One rock doesn’t make it rocky.

    Touche’

    Beats Nebraska.

    #25443
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I spent the summer of 1970 detasseling corn in Ames, walked a lot of miles through corn fields with black loamy soil.

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