Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #20460
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I just finished a repair on a iron gate I have and wanted to remind everyone to buy and have some of this product.

    I used J & B Weld products, one is J & B Weld and the other one is the J & B Weld SteelStik.

    The J & B Weld is a very strong steel reinforced epoxy with a tensile strength of 3960 PSI and holds a temperature of up to 550F.

    The J & B Weld SteelStik is not as strong but can be used on top of the J & B Weld which you can mold it with your hand. J & P Weld SteelStik has a tensile strength of 900 PSI and sets faster, at a time of 5 minutes and cure time of 1 hour.

    Why is all of these products important in a SHTF is that you can repare aluminum, brass & bronze, copper, iron & stainless steel, wood, marine parts, auto parts, plumbing, and more. It is easy to care and doesn’t cost much.
    Cost are from $3.95 to $4.95.

    I am buying more for my storage.

    #20468
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Free,

    Improvise, bro…

    One truck battery, jumper cables and a couple wire coathangers… it won’t make a “clean” weld, but it will get the job done.

    And yeah, JB Weld is good stuff… for when you don’t got the above stuff, too.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #20472
    BobbyD
    BobbyD
    Survivalist
    member6

    What is the shelf life of J & B Weld products?
    When will our need arise?

    #20473
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    Malgus I was going to say the same thing haha. The only thing is that you have to be extra mindful on the safety aspect. Even when using actual welding machines, things can go wrong and your home ends up in flaming ruins.

    Personally, a good affordable welding machine, and probably an oxy-acetylene rig, is on my list of things to get. But until then I’ll rock the JB Weld stuff for some basic repairs.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #20475
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    HAHAHA love the new avatar Red.

    #20476
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Keep in mind, one inch of proper weld can have a 10,000 psi tensile strength when you need it.

    #20479
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    If you are buying a welder make sure you buy a generator one. One with power requirements without a base power unit is a waste of time, running of a regular generator will not have enough surge power for heavy draws on certain types of welds. plus a good back up generator.

    oxy acetylene rigs are good but practice first as not as easy doing certain types of work in certain positions. Plus it is good for annealing brass cases for reloading.

    #20480
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    Namelus I’ve done a lot of welding with both types, gotta love trade college haha. I do have quite a bit of the study material kept also, so I’m pretty well good to go on it, along with other books I’ve gotten.

    Here’s a video on some improvised welding;

    And yeah Matt, the tactical bunny is the way to go haha

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #20483
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Red,
    Great video, looks like 48V is the way to go.

    #20484
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Another thing you are not thinking about J & B Weld is not just for steel, it does aluminum, copper, brass, and plastics as well. Also something breaks on the road this would make things easier. Yes welding is stronger but it is not easy to carry. The J & B Weld can go in a back pack with everything else.

    #20485
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    I agree 48 v min for anything of thickness. Might be able to weld with less volts if you use smaller welding rod for thinner metal. I think they sell actual welding rods as small as 1/16″ in diameter. The ones he was using in the video looked like 5/32″ or maybe 1/8″.

    #20486
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    JB weld is good stuff. You just have to know its limits but if JB weld, duct tape or bailing wire can’t fix it, it’s broke lol.

    #20495
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Free, I’m not dismissing jb weld at all
    I use epoxy all the time, it’s great stuff.

    #20500
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I know, 74 I am thinking of other uses for it that we are not even thinking about for a SHTF. All the epoxies are great for this. You are not going to be welding when there is danger all around you. You need a quick fix. I also find that I can’t weld steel to concrete. Maybe in the future! Also not easy to weld aluminum to steel or brass to aluminum.

    How about a rebar to a hole in a block or concrete. Oh and plastic to steel.

    #20871
    Profile photo of PhilB
    PhilB
    Survivalist
    member1

    A small portable 115/230 volt dual voltage welder such as the Miller Maxstar 150 S will work with 5 kw generators,while you can still get fuel. It’s not cheep, but If you can afford it, I think it’s a good choice. Cheaper welders are available but I worry about the reliability. Use 3/32″ 6011 and 6013 welding rods when buying rods. 1/8″ rods are also an option but they require more amps. Buy them in small packages of 5 pounds, Moisture attacks rods when they are opened, so small quantities are best. I have used this setup for remote welding and have had good results. Buy several packages of rods because when SHTF you will have a hard time getting them. Welding skills when SHTF will be valuable if you have the equipment.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.