Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 74 total)
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  • #17572
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    I started to save phone books and junk mail catalogs from suppliers for emergency TP. It stacks better then regular TP and uses way less space.

    Love it! Really smart and cheap way to store this.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #17607
    Profile photo of lci115lewis
    lci115lewis
    Survivalist
    member3

    I have 2 different self winding watches that I have been given, and a quick check of Amazon.com surprised me with the number of them out there for under $50, a good number of those are by Seiko, but I am even seeing some without a brand (or a brand that I do not recognize) for under $25.

    Mine are more of the mid-range dress watches, ones you can find for under $100 if you search but that originally listed for much more. Seeing that the low end ones are going for about the most I am willing to pay for a new quartz analog watch, I may start picking one of them up every couple years, and no longer worry about batteries in my everyday wear watch. The only reason I wear a wrist watch is my medical alert bracelt, feeling that on my arm I would always look at my wrist to check the time, not pull out a phone.

    #17627
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>74 wrote:</div>I started to save phone books and junk mail catalogs from suppliers for emergency TP. It stacks better then regular TP and uses way less space.

    Something to consider, the nice glossy and shiny magazines and catalogs are too slick, you need the ‘rougher’ uncoated paper for this use.

    #17647
    Profile photo of hurryslow
    hurryslow
    Survivalist
    member1

    Hi,

    I have a large stockpile of toilet paper, detergents and individual components that one uses to make your own detergents, e.g. Caustic soda, borax, various essential oils – excellent for medicinal use, pesticides as well as cosmerics, e.g. Lemon grass (lots), castor oil, peppermint etc, pots of non irradiated honey ( lasts forever and is not only very nutricious but also antibacteial), stationery – lots of pens in different colours, pencils, books, notepads, crayons, colouring books, asbestos gas lantern bags, gas fitting washers etc, lots of sewing needles and thread for hand sewing as well as machine sewing, basic set of sewing patterns, buttons, elastic, hooks, pressstuds, leather working tools, pins, safety pins, scissors, material for sewing, extra shoe soles and heels in various sizes, lots of extra shoe laces and covered rubber bands to tie back hair, combs, brushes and toothbrushes, reels of cotton and nylon rope, bags of cable ties in various sizes, 6 inch nails as well as smaller kinds, electrical wire and plugs, globes, a large collection of various kinds of glue and silicon, hacksaw blades, hundreds of boxes of matches, measuring jugs, container jugs, storage containers, animal dip to keep ticks, fleas and lice away, spray to keep snakes at bay (we have lots of black mamba, green tree snakes, puff adders and cobras), different kinds of knives and sharpeners, books on medicinal use of various herbs and bulk volumes of herbal tinctures especially, olive leaf, echinacea and golden seal plus deworming herbs- it lasts very long, lots of toilet soap (a bar of soap is so cheap and it never expires), stacks of candles, bulk bundles of plastic bags and ziploc bags in all sizes – vailable from catering suppliers, numerous sets of consumable spares for servicing each of our cars, fuses, globes for vehicle lights, tyre puncture repair kits, I also have large fire swatters that are made of 5 mm thick recycled conveyor belts. Really not fun to try and run from a veld fire or trying to stop one if your own fire ran away. Rolls of various kinds and thicknesses of hosepipe with fittings, all kinds of tap washers, plumbing tape, wire, nails, screws, saw blades, drill bits – various sizes for wood, steel and masonry, bulk epsom salts both for medicinal as well as fertilizer, commercial fertilizer bulk bicarbonate of soda (myriads of uses), sulphur, alum, blocks of camphor for use in home made cosmetics as well as to keep clothes moths away, bulk citric acid for veg preservation as well as for cosmetics, bulk vinegar – also myriads of uses including insecticide, bulk msm powder and vitamin C powder, copper sulphate, lots of dried chillies – when ground and mixed with water it is a great organic pesticide, loooooots of salt. You can buy food grade salt in 50 kg bags. Sink bath for laundry and personal hygiene, jugs, gardening tools (spades, forks, rake, axes, picks, shears, sickles etc), dried, compacted palm peat bricks – super for quick startup of a garden. Many, many heavy duty small and medium sized plastic storage bins, heavy duty buckets with and without lids. Our own bush geyser consists of fist sized ball bearings and bearing pins from mega sized equipment. Shape a crude cradle from thick steel wire to handle it. Then place it inside a fire to heat. Once it is hot, hook the wire cradle onto the two sides of the sink bath to lower the hot metal into the water without burning yourself with steam and you have an instant hot bath. sew thick flannel or toweling covers for paving bricks (several layers). Heat bricks carefully over a fire before placing it inside the covers and then use it as a hot water bottle substitute while saving on the water. Lots and lots of dried date bricks. Dates contain all the minerals and vitamins you need and can be stored indefinitely. Lots of those black seedling bags in various sizes. Plant one to two vegs in each and place a couple of them on a metal tray for easy handling. Your veg supply is then mobile if you have to be on the move. Lots of anti nausea suppositories. Stomach bugs or parasites can dehydrate you quickly if you can’t keep everything down. Lots of extra face cloths. I am busy sewing hygiene wipes from flannel in place of toilet paper. Each person has their own colour of cloth. After use, place in a plastic bin with detergent disinfectant solution and washed for reuse. (Each wash their own just like you would do with cloth nappies), Lots and lots of gloves – heavy and light duty, rubber, nitrile (never do latex as it is a common and bad allergen) and coated cloth for various uses. Drying and food storage racks – made our own; frame of wooden brandring, 1.5 X 0.5 metre, covered with flyscreen mesh. Try to make them exactly the same. if you turn one upside down on the other and fasten them together with clips top and , it becomes sort of a box and birds ans small animals cannot steal your stuff. Make a small 0.5 X 0.5 metre base for it. 4 Panels now make a nice size box where you can hang meat to dry without it getting contaminated with insects and pests. When not in use, just stack your mesh trays on top of each other. Extra brooms, hair brushes and hair combs. Lots of extra socks and underwear, under arm deodorant roll on. Lots of disposable razors and extra razor blades, moon cups for ladies. Baby clothes for newborn to two years in all seasons. Extra scissors and nail clippers.

    #17660
    Profile photo of hurryslow
    hurryslow
    Survivalist
    member1

    http://www.jmccanneyscience.com/SecWebOrderPg.htm

    Onky portable sun ial that is also able to recalibrate the ebtire calender in a matter of days after a polar shift. He alsomsells great water filtering systems

    #17666
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    “you need the ‘rougher’ uncoated paper for this use” Whirlybird

    Lol, not for my tender checks Whirly, If you’re interested I have some old sandpaper I’ll make a trade with you though.

    #17706
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Why don’t all you toilet paper hoarders just pull a page from history?

    Ancient romans used to keep a natural sponge on a stick in a bucket of clean water right next to the privy… finish your business, use the wet sponge. Might want to keep a towel onhand.

    Or hook up a bidet.. would be an easy thing to splice into the water line for your toilet. No paper needed.

    Just seems to me a bidet would be an easier fix than a wall of old phone books…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #17709
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Malgus, that is what I have, a bidet.

    #17720
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>74 wrote:</div>“you need the ‘rougher’ uncoated paper for this use” Whirlybird

    Lol, not for my tender checks Whirly, If you’re interested I have some old sandpaper I’ll make a trade with you though.

    No thanks, I’ll take the double quilted myself.

    Suddenly I’m reminded of a fellow Scout decades ago.
    He forgot to take a roll of the squeezably soft and was reduced to using leaves.

    Don’t get ahead of me now.

    Nope, not poison ivy, not poison oak, nor was it poison sumac.

    Itchweed.
    All those tiny tiny needle like projections, he was wishing for death with in an hour.

    #17738
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Sewing kit – At one time hotels would have these for their clients. Think I will buy a handful.
    Robin

    #17742
    Profile photo of AussieBushman
    AussieBushman
    Survivalist
    member1

    Medication for babies and/or children, like pain medicine and cold & flu treatments eg: Chest rub, Baby Paracetamol or Ibuprofen. You can’t give babies and children a regular medicine at an adult dosage. It is not fun watching an infant suffer, especially when there isn’t much you can do for them, also if an infant suffers no one sleeps.
    Cans of Evaporated Milk, mix it with water and sugar and it is an okay substitute for infant formula(1 can of evaporated milk, 18oz water & 2 tablespoons white sugar). These kinds of items are also great for barter.

    Stay positive - If it bleeds, we can kill it!

    #17754
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Aussiebushman, Great suggestions. I want to add one item to your list, Pedialyte. This product can help a dehydrated person recover. They make adult Pedialyte as well.

    #17784
    Profile photo of Anselm
    Anselm
    Survivalist
    member6

    Hurryslow, congratulations on storing borax. Very few do, or even understand its use.

    As to Malgus and Freedom, there is an alternative to the bidet: a simple jug with a spout. They are used everywhere in the Arab world when people lack a bidet, and the jug is easy to carry.

    #17803
    Profile photo of oldfatguy
    oldfatguy
    Survivalist
    member2

    Shoe Goo is a tough, rubber cement that can build up or repair worn out soles, glue patches to cover holes in the uppers, and generally glue any compatible materials together in a more permanent and more enduring manner than silicone cement. Buy it on eBay or Amazon…

    #17810
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    I’d like to build on Robin’s idea for a sewing kit above. My mother has built up a sewing kit bag over the years, which consisted of hundreds of different sorts of buttons, dozens of GOOD quality thread spools in many colors, plus any needles, curved needles, pins, threaders, and other useful bits and pieces that she had obtained over the years. She kept all this in a draw string bag she had made. This all gave her lots of choices when it came time to repair anything, and it was much better quality that the commercial sewing kits I’ve seen around in two dollar shops.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 74 total)

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