Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #49330
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    http://theantimedia.org/fema-contractor-predicts-unrest-after-395-food-price-spike-coming-soon/

    it says 5 years till then…yeah that is about 80% a year increase if all is equally spaced

    #49331
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    The article also says that these dire results were predicted by “a desktop game simulation of the conditions of a global food shortage.” It’s probably not a horrible idea for FEMA, its contractors and international counterparts, to look at possible catastrophes, and make general plans to deal with them, if they occur.

    Still, though this was only a computerized simulation, “set five years from today in a world where population growth, rapid urbanization, extreme weather and political crises combine to threaten global food security,” CNA Corporation’s research indicates, “the world’s food supply could be insufficient to maintain even current populations much further into the future. And the crisis — which several factors indicate may already be underway — may begin to worsen considerably as early as 2020.”

    It’s probably likely, given how a certain confiscatory (and proudly unproductive) “religion” is being clandestinely supported by “our” government and that of the EU. The western globalist governments make a fetish of dropping oblique hints about their vicious plans (as if that were somehow “fair warning”) before they drop them on our heads. It makes them feel so superior.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #49333
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    The article also says that these dire results were predicted by “a desktop game simulation of the conditions of a global food shortage.” It’s probably not a horrible idea for FEMA, its contractors and international counterparts, to look at possible catastrophes, and make general plans to deal with them, if they occur.

    I am glad that they are doing simulations of this nature rather than just assume there would never be such a scenario. I have long thought it was shortsighted to year after year convert farmland into commercial and residential development while at the same time the population is increasing by about 1% per year (world and US). Add to that formerly arable land being lost each year to aquifer depletion and desertification and sooner or later production vs population will collide.

    My present property is still partially in production with a sheep pasture and hay field, plus to a lesser extent pmy large veggie garden and small apple orchard but the whole property used to be farmed before my house and that of a couple neighbors were built on what had been a pretty large (for here) farm. Two prior homes I had were both in subdivisions that had once been farmland with prime soils for crops. Vast amounts of farmland have been lost in this manner.

    #49334
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Farmland conversion, in most cases these were family or hobby farms that were no longer financially viable.

    The farm was self sustaining but not truly profitable.
    Or the kids have zero interest in farming.

    Back “home” the family farm.
    A Century farm.
    My cousins have careers and lives away from the farm.
    And their parents have leased out the cropland to a neighbor.
    Most of the neighbors to the east have sold out, to the local airport.
    Only half a mile to airport property.
    Will they hold out, can they realistically?
    How long until eminent domain?

    #49335
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    What worries me is this is first time is this is first few pieces of “info” coming out and more and more get ready for something bad. In past only warnings where just before shtf if at all so why are they letting stuff like this being published and for what gain? There is always an up side for them.

    As for family farm… whirl if this is any where near right 5 more years and family will want the farm or starve. Without skills and some equipment you are screwed anyways, most cant survive the labor learning curve. Nor will have seeds and a proper balanced diet of veggies or enough calories, who would want 100’s acres of corn if that is all you and neighbors had means barter, need an old homestead approach not a modern farm 6-10 sections of one crop, with terminator seed and need for roundup to control weeds

    #49339
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    For the cousins, a days hard walk.
    Me, 800 miles.

    Skills, they have them, just no desire.
    Growing up there during the late ’70’s and through the ’80’s and the extreme difficulty then, they have zero interest in repeating the same with their kids.

    However, at least they have the option.
    Not so much around here.

    #49341
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Whirli, there is no doubt but that the economics of family farms is tough at least in the Northeast where it is hard to compete with the mega corporate farms in the MidWest. You are also right that often the kids don’t want to live that life. Then when a developer comes along offering the farmer instant riches, the decision to sell is understandable. My point is that the ongoing loss of farmland in this manner is going to eventually collide with the ongoing rise in population.

    #49342
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Agreed, and we shall see.

    #49343
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    I agree with the problem of loss of farms–lamented the loss of prime farmland way back in the 60s in NJ. All the old colonial houses and mortise-and-tenon barns were bulldozed down. Out went the productive truck farms, in came the developments with barely enough room to run a lawnmower between cheap houses. What happens when all the good soil is covered in asphalt, concrete and buildings?

    #49344
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    This is why owning usable land might be the best investment yet.

    #49345
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    wildartist, I lived in suburbia as a kid, or more accurately what became suburbia. My Town went from 5,000 people to 35,000 in 10 years. 100% of the farms became housing subdivisions or corporate headquarter type places. The last farm was in my neighborhood and the developers literally had new roads dead-ending at the borders of that farm waiting for the owners (who wouldn’t sell) to die. When they did their kids promptly sold it and it too was gone. Woodlands in town weren’t spared either.

    #49346
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I’m sorry but this study is about as inspirational as gov funded studies that found out boys are different then girls. Since there is only a 3 day food supply in urban areas so any disruption will cause a food shortage.

    #49347
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Everybody might become a farmer , of sorts ………..remember the victory garden concept during WW2 ?

    #49348
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    “Would you like to play a game of chess?”

    Keeps running around my head.

    #49349
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    Yeah … of sorts. Question is, what sort? The victory garden got a lot of people through rationing, during WW2, but at the time, somewhere close to half the population lived on, or at least came from, farms, thus knew how to grow food. Nowadays, about 2% of the population is directly involved in farming or ranching, and well more than half live in cities or suburbs with little more than postage stamp back yards, or window boxes, to “farm.” Granted, every bit helps, but those with little experience, space, and time, may find that the production fails to justify the effort.

    If the FRN “dollar” gets too close to its intrinsic worth, we may see much more than the current ~30% of America’s farm production go to overseas, to whomever can pay for it. Any neighbors who have been living on your wallet via the government may decide to eliminate the middleman. Gardens, stashes, and defensive capability all look like good ideas to me.

    Cry, "Treason!"

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.