Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #49511
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7
    #49512
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Keep fanning the flames of CIVIL WAR . A Dem gets in , prepare for SHTF in an ugly , ugly way .

    #49516
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    The referenced letter is from Dec. 20, 2012. Surely this has somehow made its way to the courts by now. The writer of the article not using current info raises a red flag for me as to the current status of this effort. Allowing that it is an ongoing program then what I don’t understand is how a physical disability somehow can preclude someone from managing their own financial affairs. A mental disability yes but not physical.

    If it is legit, then the extensions are truly scary. I as well don’t like the stance that the vet is guilty but can attempt to prove themselves innocent if they choose.

    #49518
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    It has made it to the courts, but keeps getting pushed around. CA has used this information as a way to show up at vet’s homes and physically remove firearms from their possession. Even a prescription for something like Wellbutrin for someone that is quitting smoking is enough to get your firearms confiscated in Commifornia if the state sees it. When the ACA goes into full effect in 2018 (if I remember this deadline correctly) all health records must be fully accessible to the government due to them being a payer.

    HIPAA (Health INSURANCE Portability…..) allows all health insurance companies to get access to patient charts. ACA made the government a universal payer and in 2018 all health records must be hooked into an exchange, thus the government will have unfiltered and unrestricted medical record access.

    Yup…… The simple act of going to the doctor and their opinion of what may be wrong with you is going to be enough to bypass due process for firearm removal if the Dems and RINOS get their control act about mental disorders and possible terrorist threat bill passed.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #49519
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    They cant take what they cant find ………….sure , they may get my 1938 Mosin Nagant ……….but as for the rest . Its coming people , they are in a panic , they know they will loose when it starts hard , not all in LE and the military are going to just roll over . Libs dont own guns to begin with , they are of no concern , they will fall fast if they dont lay low .

    #49520
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    I have been wondering if the current administration’s trend where they decreased military training and increased new government militia training wasn’t just a way to keep vets from being more trained that government henchmen. It doesn’t seem like there is a real need for IRS agents to have 1000’s of hours of training when an Army infantryman is lucky to fire his weapon 20 times a year.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

    #49525
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    Listen up, folks. Sledjockey’s on target about the current status. When W’s HHS Secretary, Tommy Thompson, proposed HIPAA, those inside the medical community with any degree of political consciousness, saw what was coming – and then had the horrible nightmare that was reality unfold right before them. Electronic medical records are far, far more of a threat than almost anyone has any idea. What meds anyone takes, what conditions anyone has (or at least has been diagnosed with), every procedure – it’s all there for countless people to see within the system, from RNs, PAs, psychologists, social workers, professional counselors, chiropractors, and of course MDs and DOs – among others. And ultimately, it’s really there for Uncle Sam to have full access to everything that a person permitted to write in your medical chart has to say about you. Forget privacy. Forget HIPAA. It’s not what’s stated in the forms they shove at you to sign. I have up close and personal, extensive experience behind those statements, not anyone else’s word for it. It’s not just about veterans (though that old article and the letters shown in it are still very real and relevant) – it’s about every single American that goes to a licensed medical professional of any of the above-listed varieties.

    Want some “fun?” Go to https://www.mib.com/request_your_record.html and request a copy of your MIB file (used to stand for Medical Information Bureau). See what they have (or not) on you. If you’ve applied for life or health insurance in the past 7 years (includes long term care insurance), they’ve got a file on all your medical care, courtesy of your healthcare provider – and it may or may not even be correct. It’s the medical information version of the credit bureaus, and you’re allowed a free copy of the information they have on you. (And you thought you were only allowing that insurance company to contact your doctor, and your doctor to supply the insurance company with information relevant to your insurance application? Uh, no. It also goes to MIB. But the government’s already got it anyway.)

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #49527
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I can attest to what GS is saying and had mentioned this before in a different conversation. I had applied for a life insurance policy to replace what I had when I was working and received a message from my insurance agent wanting more information on a surgery I had when I was 11 years old. They dug back a full 50 years into my history, history that predated computers. Whether my agent was privy to my full medical records or not I don’t know but bear in mind he was just an agent, not an employee of the insurance company itself and I had to explain something to him that was none of his business.

    #49529
    Profile photo of Brulen
    Brulen
    Survivalist
    member9

    When I was 11 I think I had my tonsils out. But can’t remember much else about it. If any medical records from that time period still exist I’d be amazed. Seven years for old tax forms, old business records, nobody keeps that clutter around forever. I mean nobody except hoarders keeps that junk around. I went to an estate auction recently where the guy had so much paperwork they auctioned it off by the roomful like a storage locker.

    #49537
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Brulen, the original records are surely long gone but as my case demonstrates a record of a surgery 50+ years earlier did get carried forward. And as GS points out, the list of people who have access to your medical records is extensive. Another example, the day this past spring when I had a colonoscopy is when I met the doctor for the 1st time, and it was the 1st time I had a procedure at that hospital yet he quickly rattled off my family’s cancer history without me telling him. Certainly there is an efficiency in that kind of medical record access but at the same time there is no filtering on a need to know basis which part of your record someone would have access to. That is the problematic part, especially if it can be used in politically motivated ways such as this thread speaks to with veterans.

    #49538
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    The old paper records were kept, and piled up over the years – key word: they were KEPT. Why? Not just for your continuity of medical care, but to cover the doctors’ and hospitals’ posteriors in case of malpractice claims or other law suits. Then came the age of electronic records – and scanners. Medical records were then scanned into digital format, and archived. I can verify and promise that, from personal extended experience.

    Any genealogical researcher knows about the degree to which old, VERY old, records have been scanned, digitized, archived, and now indexed in fully searchable form. Want to find somebody in the 1900 US (or many other developed countries’) census records? It ain’t the old days of blinding yourself in front of a microfilm reader, going page after page after page of faded, nearly illegible hand written census records on a screen. Now days a massive amount of that information has been electronically transcribed and indexed, and is fully searchable within minutes, from the comfort of your own home, or even on a bus using your smart phone.

    While your medical information isn’t quite so publicly available, the rest of the process is highly comparable. Years upon years upon years of old piles of medical records are now scanned and easily available to a very wide variety of people. MB and Sledjockey are absolutely on target.

    Another example. Back in college a group of us donated platelet rich plasma to a cancer research hospital as a service project to save the life of leukemia patients. They asked if they could keep samples of my white cells for an experimental program to research ways of saving the lives of cancer patients. Heck – naive 1960s me, without the benefit of seeing 50 years into the future, said, “Of course!” It seemed at the time to be the decent thing to do with no downside at all to me. Fast forward many years later, with a visit back there just to say hello to any of the old staff that might still be there (I donated roughly 100 times, and became very familiar with the staff). Sure enough, the (by then ancient) MD/PhD researcher was still there, and immediately remembered me. He gave me a tour off the updated facility, and in the course of the tour he told me that my cells from the 1960s (or their “offspring”) are still living today, as part of their ongoing research. Oh joy! Now detailed genetic material, with my name on it, is available to who-knows-who. I have no problem with the original researchers who I knew and trusted. It’s who else, particularly the government “researchers,” that I don’t know or trust. And they “own” my genetic material. Will anything bad come of it? No idea, and most likely not. But the potential implications today, from medical records and information even a half century or more ago, are truly concerning. Anyone not seeing that is naive at best.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #49686
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7
    #49687
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    … which means that the fedgov (and if needs be, the Dark State) has every bit of that data to collate with what they’ve developed on their own. You can run, but you can’t hide anywhere in this prison world. Conclusions: (1) I’ve been thinking (and expressing) thoughts of “pre-crime” (Liberty) all my life; (2) they know that; and (3) only they know when they’re going to “do something” about it. And did they limit their data-gathering to adults, or merely the data they’re currently willing to sell? Oh, well ….

    GS, your participation in “cancer research,” like mine in “bone marrow” matching, only lends credence to the idea that one day genetic research will be so thorough that they’ll be able to design viruses specifically fatal to a limited set of individuals, along with engineering all the designer work/war beasts of unimaginable strength and endurance, but precisely limited intelligence, they’ve been Jonesing for.

    Cry, "Treason!"

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by Profile photo of L Tecolote L Tecolote.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by Profile photo of L Tecolote L Tecolote.
    #49690
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    We’re too paranoid. Until we’re dead.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #49691
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    FWIW: 72 TYPES OF AMERICANS THAT ARE CONSIDERED “POTENTIAL TERRORISTS” IN OFFICIAL GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS

    Don’t worry — All your family and friends are on the list with you. The real question is: who isn’t?

    Cry, "Treason!"

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.