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  • #6372
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Most people now live in a city , moving around a city can be dangerous , but it can also be productive if you have the ability to get at the things you need , when you find them . These two tools are easy to carry and will allow you to access areas that would be denied to you otherwise . These to things are a Flat Prybar / nail pull and a sillcock key for gaining access to water . THe pry bar will open doors , locked cabinets , boxes , allow you to puncture things , dig with , you name it . The Sillcock key will give you the ability to get water from commercial buildings .

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    #6385
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Good points Tolik!
    Just imagine that you need to enter in neighbors house and take from there anything useful,including wooden things for fuel.
    In short you need something quite small, and strong to brake into things, take them apart and similar.
    I used something like crowbar, bayonet and later homemade axe with one part that looks like crowbar.

    #6397
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    I’d like to get myself one of those big Stanley Fatmax FUBAR’s. A bit more versatility than your standard crowbar, with the drawback of the added weight.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #6399
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Cool thing about commercial buildings ( a lot anyway ) is that they have back up systems , for lights especially , but will still have water pressure when the water is shut off . I have turned water on without a sillcock key , using needle nose pliers , but its not that easy to do , and takes a lot of time …………..in SHTF situation , you would get busted for sure , because it takes so long without the key . With the key , you are in and out fast .

    #6436
    anika
    anika
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Excellent ideas, thank you!

    #6472
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    I looked at the FUBAR , but like you said , I thought it was on the heavy side as well .

    #6523
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Some experience from my teenage years (being an idiot)… a larger heavy duty screwdriver can open a lot of windows and even doors! So if you look for a rather lightweight tool for breaking and entering a heavy screwdriver can get a lot done.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #6558
    Profile photo of Roadracer
    Roadracer
    Survivalist
    member7

    This is why this forum is so useful. I never even thought of sillcock key. Once again it shows you can’t think of everything.

    Have a similar bar made by Stanley. Very useful while building my deck, and a hundred other things.

    #6611
    Ghost
    Ghost
    Survivalist
    member3

    Bear with me:

    My only experience using a “sillcock key” or radiator key (as they’re more commonly known here) is for bleeding radiators, I wouldn’t want to drink radiator water as I’ve read there’s a danger of legionnaires.

    So my question is
    where are you thinking the key would come in handy?

    If at first you don't succeed, excessive force is usually the answer.

    #6620
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Ghost , most commercial buildings have their outside water access protected by a square metal panel , many different types , some with a cover , some with a hose connection exposed , all are protected , and require a sillcock key to turn on the water , the ones with a cover , require the key , both to open the cover and to turn on the water . Ever walk by a building and see a small metal plate on the side of it , about 5-6 inches square about 3 feet off the ground ? ….thats what that is . They do that to keep people from turning on their water without permission or knowledge . Almost all modern buildings have these if they have outside water access , and most do for groundskeepers or maintenance . Even office malls . All restaurant type businesses will have at least one .

    #6627
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Crowbar and a machete would be my choice.
    I would also be sorely tempted to have a cattle prod for some reason. Don’t ask me why.

    #6632
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Funny you should say that , I grew up in rural AZ , we had livestock , one time myself and another kid were playing around in the work shed . We found two cattle prods , the big ones that take 4 D cell batteries ( maybe even 6 , cant remember now , but 4 for certain ) ……………needles to say we started playing with them …………Wholly **** !! those things really hurt !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! we stopped after we both got a good Zap !

    #6635
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Tolik – yep – plus they have long handles on them. Don’t have to get real close to someone like with a tazer to seriously cause some pain….might just be enough time to get the hell away. I carry one when I am walking in the woods near the rocks for when a rattler or copperhead startle me. Handy ******.

    #6648
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    I typically have the Dead-On Annihilator handy like this one below. Many good choices on the market.

    Dead-On Annihilator

    http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/reviews/hand-tools/4274987

    #6748
    Ghost
    Ghost
    Survivalist
    member3

    Tolik, thanks for the explanation, I know of the white boxes on residential properties but they only contain the house meters (water, gas, electric) no valves that I’ve seen, I’ll double check Saturday as I’m going to the mother inlaws for the Grandnational. I can’t say I’ve every noticed them on commercial buildings, it might be due to location or I’ve never noticed due to my ignorance of them lol.

    Thanks for the explanation I’ll be going white box spotting this weekend ;o)

    (Learning something new everyday)

    If at first you don't succeed, excessive force is usually the answer.

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