Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 32 total)
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  • #41050
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Well you’re consuming it in your water…..

    Personally the 50lb bags of kosher and cooking salt are plenty cheap from restaurant supply sources, and they already fit through the salt shaker.

    #41077
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Malgus:

    http://nourishedkitchen.com/homemade-root-beer-recipe/

    All North American sourced.

    #41078
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    The bags of water softener salt in my basement have a label “not for direct food use”. I’m guessing that the processing equipment and facility will not meet US FDA standards. The manufacturing plants would have to meet a whole new level quality control, sanitation, packaging and labeling. It’s what I have for bulk salt use in case of shtf.

    #41079
    Profile photo of lonewolf
    lonewolf
    Survivalist
    member6

    we buy packaged sunflower hearts for the garden birds, from our local market-its half the price there that it is in the local farm shop. the thing is we have just found out its “baking quality” so have started adding it to our home made bread.

    British Survivalist.

    #41085
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Malgus:

    http://nourishedkitchen.com/homemade-root-beer-recipe/

    All North American sourced.

    Well, thanks… but come SHTF, I’m (we) are still faced with the same problem: “North America sourced” doesn’t help a whole lot when what I need is grown in Washington State or Oregon or Alaska when I live 2500 to 3000 miles away… some of those things in the recipe? Never heard of them. Wouldn’t even begin to know where to look for them…

    I’d have to start growing all that stuff in a hothouse right now to ensure a supply here on the doomstead…

    But still… better than Madagascar. Least I won’t need a blue water boat to get what’s needed…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #41086
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Plant it now, depending on where you live, much can be grown yourself.
    Here, not a chance without a greenhouse and a sassafrass tree but other places are easier.

    #41087
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I’ve got the dandelions, birch bark, and wild cherry bark for you Malgus.

    I made my 1st batch of rhubarb jam and it seems to have come out OK. Most recipes call for adding strawberries, blueberries or some other fruit but I figured none of those other items are locally available this early in the season and so if in the future I am to use the rhubarbs on a standalone basis, then plain rhubarb jam it is. I followed the recipe exactly but I think next time I will try it using less sugar than it called for.

    #41097
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    As a follow up to the sugar beets discussion, I went to the local farmer’s market this morning. It is actually a very large regional one and there weren’t any beet seedlings for sale, so that kind of affirms they probably don’t grow well here. I did see someone selling beet brownies however and they looked really good. Bought one, took one bite and threw it away. $3 to remind myself how much I don’t like beets. A perfectly good brownie ruined. I had to buy something else to get the beet taste out of my mouth.

    #41100
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB, I despise beets as well, but I put in a row of them for my wife. I don’t think the energy required to make sugar from them is worth the effort or cost.

    #41103
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    74, I have no inkling as to effort to make sugar but between honey and maple syrup we have other ways of adding some sweetener to things. Especially maple syrup which is in abundance here.

    I went to a large nursery this afternoon that’s more than an hour’s drive away because I like their extensive selection and quality, and no beets there either. I did buy a couple honeycrisp apple trees for future eating apples. They’re our favorites. I’ve got a small grove of 14 apple trees that are good for applesauce and cider but They don’t do anything for me as just eating apples. No idea what kind they are. I’ve got 3 other trees of a different type growing wild, one on the fence line and two growing just off the lawn. No idea what they are and they don’t do it for me as eating apples either. I let the deer have all of those.

    I bought a peach tree rated for zone 3 in hopes this one will make it. I had tried a peach a couple years ago but it didn’t make it through the winter before last. We’ll see. You don’t see peaches this far north too often. Also bought a couple seedless grapes for my 3rd attempt. These are rated to 30 below which should work as it hits minus 25 here max. One of last year’s had a single bud coming out and the frost the other day killed it. I’m not waiting to see if it’ll regenerate. Am also replacing last year’s strawberries. Only 1 out of 10 made it through the winter. The ones I bought are supposed to be good to minus 30 so we’ll see there too. Most of the cranberries survived and the blueberries should be OK. Half the branches died on each of them but the other half looks pretty good so it should regenerate. I figure if I keep planting things some will prove hardy enough to make it long term. The pears, plums, and cherries have all made it through a couple tough winters and the mulberry I put in last year made it so I’m making progress.

    #41104
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    try some nicola apples great to eat but a zone 4 tree i am in zone 3 and it has lived now 4 years. nice eating apple

    use wild strawberries they make it through -30 small but very tasty berries size of a large pea.

    you might want to try a paw paw tree weird name good fruit for zone 3.

    blue berries buy different types or you will have blue berries all in one week and not all summer. ask local plant place for the difference in season. it can go from june to september

    make sure you are buying non grafted trees, the grafted or dwarf variety are the norm and not very hardy to cold weather it means you have to prune and stake down your trees.

    for sugar… birch trees work too problem is how most people evaporate the water as the syrup is 3 or less percent of sap. we dont use wood heating till very last we use solar to evap the sap to 20 percent volume and keep the 20 percent till a full kettle then heat slow with indirect wood heat well vented so no smokey flavor.

    in end we buy alot of sugar and store it, getting a bulk group or a business license to buy is a good discount 20-40% off all bulk grocery buys. pallet loads of dry long term goods.

    #41105
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    MB,
    We have a lot of orchards with peach trees around here, -10f is the lowest temperature for are area. Painting the trunks white is vital practice apparently, it prevents spliting in the winter due to the sun heating the frozen trunk. Have you tried mounding straw over the strawberries to act like a blanket? The covered section has to be much wider than the patches to keep the cold from creeping in the sides.

    #41106
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    74, no I didn’t add straw. Last year was the 1st year I had strawberries, and I didn’t think they wouldn’t make it. Our average low is -20 but averages being what they are, it means it could be anywhere -15 to -25 which is why I am trying to buy things good to -30. In a way it is good that the past two winters have been as harsh as they were after what had been a trend line of seemingly milder winters. That which can survive hard winters should be good for the long term. I wouldn’t have been happy to have had trees growing for 10 or 15 years and then die in the 1st hard winter to come along. I have read articles that the longer term trend for the next few decades might be colder winters, just part of nature’s cycles.

    namelus, I haven’t heard of a nicola but will look to see if they are around here. On wild strawberries, there looks to be an abundance of them growing in parts of my lawn. Last year I thought to myself that come a SHTF scenario that stops us all from mowing our lawns, they will become part of an edible landscape. It’s the parts of the lawn where the grass doesn’t grow as thickly. I’ve seen paw paw trees in catalogs but never at a nursery. If I see one, I’ll buy it. It’s one of the reasons I bought the kind of property I did. There is always a spot to throw something in the ground and see what happens. If given a choice I go for the non-grafted trees but that’s not always an option. In fact most of the time it’s not. Nurseries are businesses like any other and I find most just don’t offer a whole lot of variety. It’s why I drove more than an hour each way yesterday to go to the one that I know that has the most to choose from. Interestingly it was where I found cranberries last year but they don’t have any this year. It was the 1st nursery up here that I ever found that had them. I’m always on the lookout for nurseries that carry different stuff. I started with just 3 blueberry bushes, one each of 3 types, figuring I would see what does well before buying more. I’ve also got some miniature blueberry bushes in front of the house as decorative shrubs, and they bear very well for their size. I’ve always got a few experiments going. Some work, some don’t but nothing ventured nothing gained.

    #41107
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    mb try a university near you with horticulture they will have ties to non grafted tree places as part of the educational process.

    you should get min 2 of each of the blue berry so they cross breed/ pollinate due to different ripe times.

    i use raspberry and the thorns as a food and barrier plant. you may also want to look for goji berries or wolf berries they grow into trees but are very tasty and are for -30 weather. i will try first ones this year.

    i have black berry bushes in the swales on my property as they dont mind run off and well it takes a brave person to go into a blackberry bush without making alot of noise. the little wild life loves it ( rabbits grouse quail ect) you can seed the area with other deterrents and in one year the black berry will grow through it but then it becomes impassible by anything other than a very big vehicle,

    you can also wrap the trees with geo textile (black cloth) helps them survive super cold way south of me they use it to keep palm trees alive through minus weather.

    if you have room you can always use a http://www.treehugger.com/green-architecture/build-underground-greenhouse-garden-year-round.html for your warmer needs plants .. super cheap you can make in a day if you have equipment.

    you have to pre order but if you need a lot of plants get bare root kinds they are very cheap and healthy the way commercial producers get them. you can get 7 year old 3 m trees for $70 each non dwarf .$1 a cane of raspberry. $3 a blue berry bush. you would have to order in summer to get by next year unless you luck out and find some this late.

    #41118
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    Does anybody know if you HAVE to have a cross pollinator for apple trees? Bought one two years ago and it has bloomed each year and develops a few fruits that get about the size of a small pea and then fall off. Kinda new to the fruit tree thing and you guys seem to be very versed in your trees. Thanks.

    Started raising meat rabbits this year. I am still amazed how fast they reproduce. Started with 8 at Easter have 20 now with more on the way lol.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 32 total)

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