Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 32 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #41020
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    There is a WIDE range of experience on this site. Some have been prepping for a long time and practice in everyday life, others are just getting started. We all talk about our latest piece of gear or idea we have but how many of us use or at least test out our preps? I have only really been prepping seriously for the past couple of years. I grew up in the country and have hunted and fished all my life. It’s second nature to me. That may not be the case for others. There are some here just getting started and are in a mad dash to get everything they need before time runs out. They feel they don’t have time to test or practice. I encourage everyone to slow down a bit and look at what you have. Spend some time actually using your equipment and get good with it. I bought my wife a pressure canner for mothers day this year. We have never canned but have read lots about it and have friends that do it. We tried to make some blackberry jam…..we got blackberry syrup lol. No big deal as it is fantastic on pancakes. While it is no big deal now and we were able to repurpose the concoction, in SHTF this could have been a waste of valuable resources. If this had been say a solar array we set up to power our well and we fried it during SHTF it would have been a huge loss. If you are new here and have specific questions, ask, there are a lot of folks with a lot of experience to share. If you have a funny story about trying stuff out share it as well. We can all learn from each others mistakes.

    #41021
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    http://www.pickyourown.org/pectin.htm

    Matt,
    That syrup sounds awesome! Something happened with the pectin that the jam didn’t jell. The above link has answers, my guess is not letting it boil long enough.

    #41022
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    I would really love to find someone who knows how to turn sugar beets into sugar (that doesn’t taste like beets)…

    You know, take sugar beets from the garden and process them into white sugar. Because sugar beets and sugar cane are the only places we get granulated sugar – to the best of my knowledge…

    I tried to make sugar from sugar beets once…. it was… well, frankly it was vomit-inducing. I had to throw it out.

    Professional – or even amateur help, would be appreciated..

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #41026
    Profile photo of WhiteKnight
    WhiteKnight
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    Well, this youngster might just be able to pull that off. College chem and lab techniques still fresh in mind… let me see what I can dig up.

    #41028
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    74 I am thinking along the same lines. I didn’t want all the seeds in it so we ground all the berries through a strainer resulting in a mostly seedless thickish juice. I think I should have let the juice and sugar cook down more before adding the pectin. It was the first time I had tried to make jam with a juice to start. My mom used to make strawberry jam when I was a kid but she always started with whole strawberries and would cook it down for a long time. I was really young so I don’t know if she used pectin or not.

    Malgus your sugar concoction sounds like some of the drinks we tried to invent in college lol.

    #41031
    Profile photo of matt76
    matt76
    Survivalist
    member8

    74 after looking through the link I did it ALL wrong :) . I doubled the recipe and didn’t cook it long enough. That is a great link btw. It is now saved to my favorites. Thanks

    #41033
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I have the gardening down well this year and will work on improving. On the cherry tomatoes I must have grown over 5,000 or more and still growing. The larger tomatoes not as good but better then last year, about 100. I believe that we all need to get ready for what is coming. All points to an economical collapse coming and the governments of the world and the IMF, UN all know this is down the pipeline. They are printing and planning for what is coming. The question is HOW LONG CAN THEY HOLD UP. It is the question we all do not know but I do know it will happen from one day to the next with no warning.

    I would also keep your eyes open for Sept 23 or 24th. It maybe the date of the beginning of things to come.

    #41034
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Having lived in sugar beet country, I can’t say how many I picked up from the roadside.

    We had the Western sugar plant nearby also, what a stench, hated going to Brush/FtMorgan because of it.

    http://americanpreppersnetwork.com/2012/12/how-to-make-your-own-sugar.html

    Here’s a little help.

    #41038
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Having lived in sugar beet country, I can’t say how many I picked up from the roadside.

    We had the Western sugar plant nearby also, what a stench, hated going to Brush/FtMorgan because of it.

    http://americanpreppersnetwork.com/2012/12/how-to-make-your-own-sugar.html

    Here’s a little help.

    Thank you.

    I was speaking with my son the other day. We were trying to figure out which things we would miss the most come SHTF. I picked vanilla, coffee and schnapps. He picked sugar and chocolate. Most of the stuff we consume is grown and processed 1000 miles away, on average. Sometimes, on the other side of the planet. I forget which ingredient it is, but to make root beer (which I love), it requires something from the island of Madagascar… come SHTF, adios root beer.

    I can’t do anything about coffee and chocolate… or vanilla… except pile it high and deep. But I can try small scale sugar production. Sugar beets might do well here. Who knows? Might be able to make enough for us, and some for trade… black strap molasses will be right popular as well.

    Thanks again for the link.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #41039
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    In addition to Whirl’s link, I found this…

    https://www.richters.com/show.cgi?page=InfoSheets/d1340.html

    Requires some odd stuff, like a juicer and seltzer water, but 2 big sugar beets – about 20 lbs total – will yield about a cup and a half of sugar… and black strap molasses…

    Not an exceptional yield, but still… if I absolutely HAD to have sugar…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #41041
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Matt is right about trying things. Best to have failures when it doesn’t really matter. I’ve had more than a few. You also need to have the stuff. An example I use are canning jars and lids. If you plan on preserving stuff from the garden, how do you plan on doing so? If canning, then you will need hundreds of jars to set aside any meaningful volume. And even more lids.

    I also mucked up my 1st attempt making strawberry jam. The end result was a much too sweet syrup for which only a single use was found…..putting it on vanilla ice cream. Even then it was too sweet but my father-in-law didn’t mind it so I gave it all to him. I have rhubarb ready to harvest and having never done anything with it before I suppose I’ll try to make some kind of jam.

    #41043
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I don’t know that anyone grows sugar beets around here and think our sweetener substitutes would be honey and maple syrup. I don’t care to eat beets myself, in fact I detest them, but if I can find a couple plants ready to go I’ll throw them in the garden just to see what happens. In-between time I have set aside a lot of sugar. One of those easy to set aside inexpensive preps. On that note, however much salt you have set aside, get more. It will prove incredibly useful in preserving meats and fish, plus you use it with a lot of canning recipes. Again, easy to set aside and inexpensive.

    #41044
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    A local museum where I grew up made molasses every year, fresh for the patrons of their living history week.

    Here’s a link to making molasses from sorghum.

    http://www.ltl.appstate.edu/436/schools/beech/community/molasses/molassesmake.htm

    They also made the best apple butter fresh daily.
    Hmm will have to have my parents swing in and get me some, now I have a craving.

    #41046
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    I have rhubarb ready to harvest and having never done anything with it before I suppose I’ll try to make some kind of jam. – MB

    My mamma used to make the absolute BEST rhubarb pie… never had the like, before or since… some folks around here make a halfway decent strawberry-rhubarb pie, but it doesn’t have the whang! that a straight rhubarb pie does… that sort-of tangy bite to it that’s a perfect counterpoint for vanilla ice cream…

    Dang… now I’m hungry.

    On that note, however much salt you have set aside, get more. It will prove incredibly useful in preserving meats and fish, plus you use it with a lot of canning recipes. Again, easy to set aside and inexpensive.

    This. +1

    Salt used to be traded ounce for ounce with gold for a reason.

    After winter is probably the best time to stock up on salt. At least around here. Loads of places carry Morton rock salt for driveways… they always overstock, then let the rest go for super cheap when it gets warm. It’s exactly the same thing – sodium chloride – as the finely granulated Morton salt that costs more. To me, it’s all the same, and a 30lb bag of Morton rock salt for your driveway is just as good as the finely ground stuff they sell with the canning supplies…

    Who was it that said “failure” is just finding out what won’t work? Edison? Something like that. If so, then we’re in good company.

    Edit: about salt. Mid-summer is when the county takes delivery of their road salt from the distributor. It’s plain old sodium chloride rock salt, straight from the mines. What my daddy used to do was get a big old plastic garbage can, clean it, then drive down to where the city used to store their rock salt supply. Slip the yard guy a ten spot, or whatever, and then take home a big old garbage can of salt. The amount he wanted was so piddly compared to the huge pile that was there, the yard guy didn’t care.

    Don’t know how much salt will fit in the average plastic garbage can, but me and my daddy could barely lift it… and I was pushing a solid 200lbs at the time and daddy was no slouch, either… the salt has mineral deposits in it, so it’s not pure white, but it’s the genuine article…. well worth the money and effort.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #41048
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    A question about salt. Is the salt used for water softeners safe for human consumption? I buy 40# bags for just a few dollar on sale and usually have a couple hundred pounds stacked up next to the water softener . The question is for SHTF circumstances. Salt in the grocery store is cheap enough at present, and we really don’t use much in day to day living anyway. Come SHTF however and its usage would go up.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 32 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.