Viewing 12 posts - 16 through 27 (of 27 total)
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  • #5816
    anika
    anika
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Loved that pond tip, especially – thank you Tweva!

    Mine is about coffee. Green coffee beans cost around $5/lb online (shipped-in, plus S&H) and last for years in burlap/jute/canvas. One site I read said that, at cooler temps, you can get up to 25 yrs shelf life out of them, but I have no personal experience of that.

    So if you are concerned about your java when SHTF, buy some green coffee beans. One place I know of online is called http://www.SweetMarias.com. I have ordered from them for 4 yrs now and always get excellent coffee; I buy the 8-pack sampler (8 lbs for $40; they do have smaller sampler packs, plus non-sampler straight coffees, single estate) and you get a variety of coffees from around the world.

    You don’t need fancy equipment to prepare green coffee beans, either:

      1) Dry-fry them in a pan on medium-low heat (no higher – they keep cooking after you remove from heat!) for about 4-8 minutes, depending on darkness of roast desired. Stir constantly while “frying.” There are also oven-baked methods you can find online, if stovetop isn’t your thing. A lot of this info is contained in Sweet Maria’s library, too.

      2) Blow off the separated husks when removing from pan onto a cookie sheet.

      3) COOL/off-vent. This is critical. You must put them on a cookie sheet or something for at least 3 hrs. Up to 24 hrs if you can.

      4) Grind. You can either do this after cooling, or as you need. This is the only part you’ll need special equipment for, but you can buy a small grinder (even electric) fairly inexpensively, or find on Free Cycle or Craigslist, or you can even get a hand mill for when SHTF.

    Coffee will be a valuable commodity when SHTF, but even with shipping costs, this is some of the least expensive “good” coffee I can find, even now.

    If anyone has personal experience with shelf life of the green beans, I would love to hear more info about this part of it (I always drink mine up before I remember to test duration, but I do have some burlap and want to try it!). Also I could use a fire and a pan if I had no electric, but does anyone want to hazard a guess as to how the oven method might fare in a solar oven? Thanks!

    Edit: I feel I should make a nod to the fact that the scent of roasted coffee carries far, though I suspect most people on this forum realize that. So does just about any kind of coffee (even pre-ground, industrial-sized, sealed cans of Folger’s), except maybe instant. So unless you’re far away from others, I realize that roasting coffee beans may not be the best idea for SHTF, but I think this info will be helpful anyway. And even if you are unable to prepare it at that time, the beans would likely still be good for barter!

    #6213
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Slingshots are an excellent piece of equipment for survival kits. Just make sure they are legal in your area of the world. As with any hunting tool, practice until you are accurate with your chosen ammunition and with stones, just in case you are in the field and lose your ammo/use it up

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #6214
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    If you find good tinder, regardless of if you are on the move or not, grab it. The last thing you need is to get to your stop for the night and find that there’s no good tinder in the area.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #6215
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    Dont leave your camp after dark unless absolutely necessary. Even if you have some form of illumination device, torch, headlamp etc, it can be extremely dangerous. You take a fall over a log, twist your ankle in a hole or fall off a cliff, and you definitely reduce your chances of survival.

    But if you must don’t go alone.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #6220
    Profile photo of libbylindy
    libbylindy
    Survivalist
    member4

    Anika, I have a sun oven and I need to get some beans and try it – for roasting and also for the smell. Usually I can’t smell any of the things that I cook in the sun oven, since it has a seal around it. This would be a wonderful barter item if needed. Who wouldn’t want a cup of coffee after SHTF? It might be more popular than booze! It should grind up fine in the hand operated food grinder. I would use one just for the flavorful things like coffee and keep the other for grains and such.

    #6223
    anika
    anika
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Would love an update after you try that, libbylindy!

    And Gypsy, that is so true about not leaving after dark! Just too many unknowns, including other humans and animals, and we aren’t equipped to see in those conditions. No reason to invite trouble! (Serious about this; a dumb teenager trick in my youth of wanting to wander out after dark with friends ended up with one of the worst injuries of my life!)

    I didn’t realize slingshots are illegal some places. Probably about like gill nets, but would be useful in survival mode (I think that is the only time, in fact, that you are allowed to use a gill net legally in my area, is if you are lost and have to resort to it to survive, so presumably even if there are authorities after SHTF, a case could be made).

    #7246
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    I recently called out the battery replacement guy to put a new battery in the car. The battery hadn’t died but I figured with it being three years old it would die soon. The guy tested it and said it was indeed on its way out and should be replaced. He was amazed and also said he had NEVER had anyone take such a preventative measure before; every other time in his experience people only call him when the battery was already dead.

    So the tip here is to write with a marker pen on a new battery the month and year of installation (because it’s easy to assume the time less than it really is) and just replace it when it’s coming to the end of its projected life and not try to squeeze the last bit of energy from it. Also find out the typical life span of that type of battery, as some are made to last longer than others.

    The second tip is to keep in your kit, or in the car, the computer code if you have a car that needs to be reset when the battery has been disconnected.

    A third tip is to see how hard it is to replace a battery on your car. My car has a small engine bay and the battery is surrounded with stuff and has a difficult to remove plastic cowling. Learning in advance how to change the battery can save a lot of trouble later on.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

    #7254
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    My tip of the day is “cook with what you have”. If you simply get a bit more adventurous and mix and match the ingredients you do not only discover really yummy new recipes, you also become more flexible when it comes to eating food. Living in Asia has really broadened my horizon what kind of things I can eat (fried insects for example) and how weird flavored they can be (spicy, sweet and sour at the same time!).

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #9812
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    bandanas

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #17063
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    What I noted mentally today as working around the place:

    1) zinc oxide – store it. Great sunscreen (better than the crap they sell specifically that that slides off if you sweat). Also good for diaper rash and other skin stuff

    2) if you have a pond and you intend to keep it as a source of water and fish – do NOT plant cattails. In fact, if you see one starting to grow, get out your waders and a shovel and dig the darn thing up. They will take over a pond in no time and you’ll be left with a boggy mess. Yes, I know cattails are useful and edible – but grow them somewhere else far away from your pond

    3) flyswatters are one of the simplest, most effective tools some smart person ever made. Something cathartic about killing those things

    4) if you run out of fly strips (sticky things that hang down and flys stick to it – comes in a stubby little rolled tube), make your own. A paper clip pierced through the end of a strip of newspaper and covered in molasses with a paint brush will do – then just hang it in an open window or doorway

    5) tool belts are wonderful inventions – and not just to carry some spare ammo. Without the stuff I carry in it I would waste a lot of time and forget to do a lot of the simplest things I need to get done. I’m there, the basic tool is there – I do it on the spot. I.e., clipping, trimming, nailing something back etc

    6) Store: several rolls of different gauge wire. They don’t have to be big and they aren’t expensive. Amazing what you can do with it/fix with it

    7) Store: several rolls of different size screening. Again – very useful especially if you grow stuff. A screen patch kit in SHTF – very useful in the country at least with the bugs

    8) Store: plumbers putty. The stuff that comes in small tube, you add stuff to it and makes it mouldable to fix a leak and dries hard as a rock. Great for other stuff too.

    9) BUCKETS!!! I realized today how many times a day I reach for a bucket …and how many kinds and sizes I have. Buy sturdy ones with comfortable handles or put a piece of pipe insulation over the handle for comfortable carry (comes in a small roll pre-slit with tape you remove to stick both sides together)

    Ok – that’s what I thought of today – might be useful to someone.

    #17072
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    Here is a link to a way to use those old plastic drink bottles.

    http://www.wimp.com/stringbottle/

    I don’t know the language but the video is clear that one can high speed rotate the bottle and cut a thin filament of the plastic to make a long length of what resembles nylon fishing line, which can be used like string.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

    #17086
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    In Indonesia there is a substance known as “Patay” (not sure of correct spelling) that tastes like peanut butter. About 12 hours later you will have many other names for it! I thought I would never be able to get out of the bathroom.
    I suggest you stick with food you brought with you or local food a friend recommends.
    Robin

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