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  • #55358
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    [Note: Without any editing – which usually has seemed to be the cause of suddenly deleted posts – the original version of this post disappeared the moment I posted it, multiple times. Here it goes again, with only an article URL that contains a video, rather than the video itself this time. If it disappears again, I’ll take the “hint.” How ironic, given the topic at hand, but probably just pure coincidence. Certainly. ;-) ]

    We hear how great President Xi is, and how much we need to partner with China, etc., etc., etc. And we know that they’ve managed to fully move into the 21st century, technologically. So it should be little wonder that we’re learning just a bit about how deep surveillance of “their” people goes.

    Selco (I think wisely) chose to include a “News & Current Events” thread in the Forum. While it could be used to draw away discussion of the primary topic at hand, it also potentially informs about an aspect of preparation that few really stop to consider, or are at least too casual (i.e. unguarded) about: personal privacy. Take the following brief portion of the post bearing this topic’s title:

    [A] 34-year-old Uighur farmer, described as an “impressive student,” says he never realized until receiving political education that his behavior and style of dress could be manifestations of “religious extremism.”

    Detention for political education of this kind is not considered a form of criminal punishment in China, so no formal charges or sentences are given to people sent there, or to their families. So it’s hard to say exactly what transgressions prompt authorities to send people to the centers. Anecdotal reports suggest that having a relative who has been convicted of a crime, having the wrong content on your cell phone, and appearing too religious could all be causes.

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/meghara/the-police-state-of-the-future-is-already-here?utm_term=.drNPo0g6B#.jaOaZQ7Yq

    That article was back in October, and is well worth reading all the way through. A brand new article shows just how far technology is being taken – or at least how far anyone’s willing to publicly disclose:

    “China Is Vacuuming Up DNA Samples From Xinjiang’s Muslims”

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/meghara/china-is-quietly-collecting-dna-samples-from-millions-of?utm_term=.xqAMx1Nlj#.vkAzqaZB9

    But most of us still active here in the Forum live in North America, so of what value is the above to us (or most anyone in Western Europe, Australia, Japan, etc.)? And what does it suggest for those interested in preparation? In my mind, if/when SHTF really does happen (and even in the run-up to it), it may be a topic of great interest (and personal relevance) to most anyone – particularly if no preparation has been taking place for quite some time. Data is being gathered at rates we can’t even know, but can gain some clues about from what “they” are willing to share with us. For example, the following has been posted here previously, but may be worth a review, or as new information for those that have not seen it. Just remember, this is merely what they WILL tell us about the capabilities. In reality, identification of a cigarette brand could be determined from “high altitude” decades ago (not just one or two decades, either). And now “they” have the Google platform in which almost unimaginable amounts of data are being stored, processed, linked, etc., in state-of-the-art databases. Plus, the U.S. government’s NoSuchAgency has the massive “Utah Data Center” just south of Salt Lake City (Bluffdale). Why would they have that much data capability, and what might they do with it? (That’s rhetorical, not necessarily asking for responses here, just suggesting personal reflection.)

    Every attempt below at posting the many videos directly into this post has resulted in a post that never makes it to this Forum. It turns out YouTube has apparently deleted the multiple versions of it. So here goes yet another attempt – read the article, but particularly watch the short (less than 5 minute) video embedded in the article:

    http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/146909-darpa-shows-off-1-8-gigapixel-surveillance-drone-can-spot-a-terrorist-from-20000-feet

    Notice what they are willing to disclose in the video, vs. how much more they aren’t. We don’t have to be personally identified as a “Person of Interest* to have our data collected in the massive effort that already exists, both government and “private” industry. (*For those that haven’t seen the TV show by the same name, it’s well worth watching, particularly the first and 2nd seasons.) Remember, once it’s “out there” to be gobbled up into the databases for sorting and connecting, it’s “out there” permanently by whoever chooses to use it, and when. Nuf sed.

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #59263
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    In the air or on the ground, here’s more of the tracking capabilities. Probably none of us are ICE targets here, but the mere fact that the technology is being used by the feds and others, and the fact that there is considerable input from multiple unnamed sources as you read even just this excerpt, should be of concern to anyone who cares at all about personal privacy, liberty, etc. Here’s just an excerpt from the full article – again, focus on the capability, not the target population associated with this article:

    ICE agents would be able to query that database in two ways. A historical search would turn up every place a given license plate has been spotted in the last five years, a detailed record of the target’s movements. That data could be used to find a given subject’s residence or even identify associates if a given car is regularly spotted in a specific parking lot.

    “Knowing the previous locations of a vehicle can help determine the whereabouts of subjects of criminal investigations or priority aliens to facilitate their interdiction and removal,” an official privacy assessment explains. “In some cases, when other leads have gone cold, the availability of commercial LPR data may be the only viable way to find a subject.”

    ICE agents can also receive instantaneous email alerts whenever a new record of a particular plate is found — a system known internally as a “hot list.” (The same alerts can also be funneled to the Vigilant’s iOS app.) According to the privacy assessment, as many as 2,500 license plates could be uploaded to the hot list in a single batch, although the assessment does not detail how often new batches can be added. With sightings flooding in from police dashcams and stationary readers on bridges and toll booths, it would be hard for anyone on the list to stay unnoticed for long.

    Note the reference in the 2nd paragraph to “commercial LPR [license plate reader] data.” That could be read multiple ways, with multiple implications – not many of which are soothing go-to-sleep thoughts.

    https://www.theverge.com/2018/1/26/16932350/ice-immigration-customs-license-plate-recognition-contract-vigilant-solutions

    Combining that with the “eye in the sky” story in the above post, and knowing that’s only the tip of the iceberg in terms of capability, leaves one with less than a comfortable sense of peaceable privacy. Cameras everywhere – just slow down and look around some time (plus the ones high above that you don’t see) ….

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This reply was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #59467
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    License plates readers have proliferated. A friend in NJ told me she passed a cop going in the opposite direction and he turned around and pulled her over. His license plate reader told him that her registration had expired 3 days earlier. An innocent mistake on her part but one that cost her several hundred dollars in fines and court costs.

    Probably 10 years ago or so where I lived in MA there was an interstate exchange with a large busy rotary. The State comes by and cuts all the trees down on the inside of the rotary and puts up these cameras on poles. There was some public outcry over the cutting of the trees and the State’s response was that they needed to cameras to monitor traffic. This was in an area that passed for rural in MA where there were never traffic jams except for the rare accident or construction project. Clearly traffic had nothing to do with it. They were capturing license plates passing above on the interstate and below on the rotary.

    I have since noticed those same cameras in the sky here in rural VT on what passes for major roadways. If you don’t look closely you might think it is just a street light and not even notice that it doesn’t come on at night. They say they are monitoring winter road conditions, but you know it is really capturing license plates year round.

    #59468
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    In Phoenix , they used to have automated vans , that photoed plates and issued tickets , they also attempted to put cameras in strange places , they ended up taking them all down , and removing the speed trap vans . Why ? Because they were getting SHOT UP .

    #59479
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    they ended up taking them all down , and removing the speed trap vans . Why ? Because they were getting SHOT UP .

    I’m surprised they weren’t able to prosecute the shooters – by capturing them on video just before the camera “died.” Heck – you can’t even trek in from a distance, dressed in all black including a black balaclava. The cameras along the way from where you parked and pulled the balaclava down over your face would have tracked you, and taken a photo of your parked vehicle’s license plate.

    I just read a story today that Beverly Hills, CA, is installing 600 more cameras – to prevent crime, of course.

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-beverly-hills-cameras-20180127-story.html

    It gets even worse. This is from an article on the ACLU web site:

    · A police officer in Washington D.C. pleaded guilty to extortion after looking up the plates of cars near a gay bar and blackmailing the car’s owners.
    · The DEA contemplated using license plate readers to monitor people who were at a gun show. Since the devices can’t distinguish between those who are selling illegal guns and those who aren’t, a person’s presence at the gun show would have landed them in a DEA database.
    · A SWAT team in Kansas raided a man’s house where his wife, 7-year-old daughter, and 13-year-old son lived based in part on the mass monitoring of cars parked at a gardening store. The man was held at gunpoint for two hours while cops combed through his home. The police were looking for a marijuana growing operation. They did not find that or any other evidence of criminal activity in the man’s house.

    https://www.aclu.org/blog/privacy-technology/location-tracking/documents-uncover-nypds-vast-license-plate-reader-database

    Finally, the background of the Chairman of the Advisory Council of a major company involved in this technology:

    LIVERMORE, CALIFORNIA (August 13, 2012)

    Vigilant Solutions announces today that it has established an Advisory Council to support its planned development of new and innovative intelligence solutions for law enforcement. The Advisory Council will leverage the deep expertise and knowledge of its members to guide future product development efforts.

    The Chairman of the Advisory Council is Mr. Howard Safir. Mr. Safir has a long and distinguished career as Police Commissioner of New York City, Director of Operations for the United States Marshals Service, Assistant Director
    of the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Fire Commissioner of New York City, member of the Executive Committee of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and Board Member of Lexis ‐ Nexis Special Solutions, Verint Systems and Implant Sciences Corporation.

    The other members of the council are similarly “qualified.”

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    • This reply was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint GeorgiaSaint.
    #59481
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Not hard , the cameras face in one direction , limited field of view . The vans also have limited focus , not to mention , from what is known , all were from large cal rifles , which in my mind , means the shooters were probably not all too close . One of the reasons I couldnt wait to get out of Phoenix , is that its a concrete jungle of buildings . ” 8 million people in the metro area , and 1 billion cars ” , and the place continues to spread . This is the same place where they had a sniper shooting random drivers on I 10 .

    #59482
    Profile photo of GeorgiaSaint
    GeorgiaSaint
    Veteran
    member9

    ” 8 million people in the metro area , and 1 billion cars ” , and the place continues to spread .

    And what happens with a serious drought? But I do have to wonder where the vehicle figure came from – that’s 125 cars per person. ;-)

    GS
    "Ye hear of wars in far countries, and you say that there will soon be great wars in far countries, but ye know not the hearts of men in your own land."

    #59635
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    lol gross exaggeration , but too many cars there .

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