Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
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  • #14605
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    I just spent five days with my sixteen year old daughter at what is classed newfoundlands only childrens hospital.
    She broke out in a rash 10 days before her arrival at the kids hospital, she seen our doc who gave her a seven day script of antibiotics on day three of the rash. Well instead of getting better it spread. She went down to have it checked again on day 10. Our vet…sorry Doc said she wasn’t sure what it was so called the Janeway pediatricians. They then said to have her brought in. Once we arrived she sat four three hours waiting on blood tests in the emergency room. When nothing came back they decided to keep her for observation, and change the antibiotic to a stronger one.

    So we moved four floors up and she was then placed in Isolation. That was fun…not!! For those who don’t know what that is like in the medical field. Well here is a run down for your reference.

    The room is behind two sets of glass doors. Before you enter the first set you dress.
    Robe, gloves. Long hair tired back. Masks put on if they think its airborn. We didn’t use these as she was classed more under the hands on contact. Next you enter the tiny glass room, close the door behind you after entering.

    Then you open the next set of doors and you are now in the the patients room. Once inside you then do what you need to do. With her it was check vitals every three, then six hours. Her antibiotics where by IV, so they then run the lines. She was set up with a saline drip when she was sleeping so the nurse could come in while she was sleeping and switch it over to the meds without waking her.

    When checking her rash gloves stayed on at all times. in all actually they placed a second pair on just before touching the rash to apply a cream. these where then taken off leaving the other pair still on. once things were finished they would then enter the small glass room and disrobe, robe’s going into a laundry basket, gloves and masks into the garbage. they would then leave the room closing it off again.

    When it was time for eating the kitchen staff would come as far as her door and I would then take the food from them and return to her room.

    The room itself was pretty much self contained. The living quarters had a bed, a night table and chair that turned into a bed. There was a sink and one closet for personal items. The room had its own full bathroom, tub/shower toilet, sink. Nothing that could be touched by the outside.

    the glass room you entered through has its own sink and cupboards with medical supplies such as N95 masks, more gowns and gloves. Then first aid items.
    *********************************************************************************************************************************
    Here is the kicker. I didn’t have to robe up and glove up. As the childs mother I was classed as infected, yet I could come and go as I pleased.I has allowed to walk the halls of the hospital, I was allowed to enter the cafeteria to pick up my own food, I could leave the building and return. Some one tell me where this went wrong. I can tell you from this that my sick room will not allow that to happen. If my daughter had been infectious, I could have been a carriers and infected most of the hospital all on my own.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #14616
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Having spent more hours in ER’s over the years than most, dealing with other peoples problems, I hate hospitals in general and avoid them if at all possible.

    Infectious, hazardous, just plain nasty, been around it all.

    Some hospital procedures are ridiculous, some are laughable. I all too often wonder just how much is spread by the personnel themselves, despite their precautions.

    Hope you both are doing better.

    #14627
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    Wow this is crazy. I wonder if there are some “benefits” or special money the hospital can claim for treating your kid like this. I hope she gets better soon.

    There is of course no sense at all in the way the staff handled this. Its good to hear your daughter is already sixteen so she can understand what’s going on. I imagine putting a younger kid into such a scary environment and isolation could have serious effects on their mental health.

    What did the staff say to you? Did they even give you the option to dress up?

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #14645
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Those of you who read the medical episodes that Bushrat and I went through, know that the only infections he contracted were from the hospital.  This was during a period of over two years of open wounds.

    Another laughable but serious thing was the home health nurse who used to come and change Bushrat’s bandages.  She would drop stuff on the floor and continue to use it.  When I objected, she said “Oh well this is not a sterile situation anyway…”   I told them not to come back.  I changed his bandages two and three times a day for years and never had a problem (until the hospital staph infection and consequent C diff).

    Yes, hospitals are a mess.  More likely to get sicker and die there than at home.

    #14646
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    BTW Jay, are you still in Bangkok?  Stay safe!  Nothing is worth staying for, if your lives are in danger.

    #14649
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Gypsy Wanderer Husky
    Survivalist
    exprepper

    She wasn’t happy about it at all. And had two temper tantrums which I handled not the nurses. One over her her IV placement which was on her dominate arm, not hand, rendering her helpless to feeding her self anything liquid wouldn’t make it to her mouth, and the other was over meds that they decided to gave when they felt like it, being both ptsd and a.d.d she is on meds that are timed doses. I should have been nice and let her loose on them.lol

    Other wise with being sixteen she dealt with it, she had her cell phone and the internet so she survived.
    But we came home with a new look on things, and the flu followed us home as well.
    But all is well on the home front.

    Prepare for the unknown by studying how others in the past have coped with the unforeseeable and the unpredictable.
    George S. Patton

    #14662
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    BTW Jay, are you still in Bangkok? Stay safe! Nothing is worth staying for, if your lives are in danger.

    We left today. Thank you for your concern. :)

    Other wise with being sixteen she dealt with it, she had her cell phone and the internet so she survived.
    But we came home with a new look on things, and the flu followed us home as well.
    But all is well on the home front.

    Glad everyone is back home. I was struggling with a couple of ongoing problems in the last couple of years and what I learned was that when it comes to any kind of medical service you have to put a lot of effort in to get the right treatment, right doctor and right advice.

    If you or a loved one has a condition that isnt very common, even do your own research. I give my endocrinologist advice and tell them about the latest studies related to hashimoto’s thyroiditis (chronic inflation of the thyroid). She basically just writes down recipes for stuff I need / want.

    By the way, one thing that worked really well for me when we had the flu in our home the last time was to rinse my nostrils with a salt water solution right on the first day when I started feeling something is a bit off. I had way less severe symptoms and was able to avoid getting a cough (which I usually do).

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #14769
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    The last time I was in the Janeway was when I had my tonsils removed, and it was a cluster f*ck back then too. Glad it was only for a couple days.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #14848
    Profile photo of Pheonix
    Pheonix
    Survivalist
    member5

    When my nephew was 3 years old he contracted Swine Flu and Bronchial Pneumonia at the same time. They had to put him in a drug induced coma for six weeks to cure it. He lost over half his body weight and before he came home had to have a feeding tube installed so my brother and his wife could feed him while he slept because he could not eat enough when he was awake to gain back the proper body weight fast enough.

    It took him  a year to after he got home for his immune system to recover and for him to regain his weight and health. Now he is a typical six year old.

    #14863
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Because everything else here is going down, things in hospitals going down too. So here advice is simple-stay in hospital only if you really need.
    And bribe folks there a lot, otherwise you going to have more problems then benefits from being there.

    Just like Whirlibird, I hate being there because I know how system work inside.

    #14866
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    Simple way to hold down on airborne germs – Onions!

    In the room with the sick one take an onion and cut it in half. Lay each half on a small plate with the cut side up. Put one on each side of the bed where the person puts their head. Do this just at bed time. The next morning pick up the onions, they will be black, and throw them in the trash and then tie the bag.

    Now I buy only small onions. If I can not use the entire onion then I throw away what I do not need. One look at an onion after it has soaked up germs will make it’s point.

    Robin

    #15011
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>Jay wrote:</div>
    one thing that worked really well for me when we had the flu in our home the last time was to rinse my nostrils with a salt water solution right on the first day when I started feeling something is a bit off. I had way less severe symptoms and was able to avoid getting a cough (which I usually do).

    I share with someone who uses a thing called a Netti Pot, which is for rinsing sterile saline through the nose; she says it clears the nose of all sorts of contaminants that are breathed in, such as bugs (germs), pollen, dust, anything really. It’s also good for clearing congested nasal passages. She says it works pretty well.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

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