Viewing 3 posts - 16 through 18 (of 18 total)
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  • #50835
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    We had a security system installed when we first bought our place as it was a 2nd home only being used on the weekends. We don’t have local police and the County Sheriff’s dept doesn’t respond to home alarms being they don’t have capacity for that kind of stuff. The security company would call the State Police which then makes it a factor of how close is the closest one available to respond. And hope its between the hours of 8AM and 2AM because nobody is on duty from 2AM to 8AM. The day shift and night shift are each on call for half of the no-coverage 6 hour window if something important does happen, but that incurs the added delay of getting out of bed first. There are 20 troopers in total covering nearly 1,000 sq.miles for my district, spread across those two shifts and 7 days of the week, and with holidays, vacation, sick days etc. making it more like 4 or 5 troopers covering that 1,000 sq. miles at any given time with a population of over 60,000 plus all of the ski area, lake, and other tourists that come here.

    That’s a long way of saying its a good thing the crime rate is very low. Our best hope is that the alarm itself would scare the perps off were we to be robbed. I’m thinking maybe we should install cameras to at least get photos of the robbers.

    #50842
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous
    Survivalist

    Many modern systems also have the capability of sending you a text message with whatever change happens in the system – alarm somehow turned off, water alarm, smoke, carbon monoxide, break-in, motion detected, etc. (if you have each of those devices installed). If you’re nearby you can get home quickly. If you’re far away, you can either call local police or a trusted neighbor. Personally, I like the wireless systems with a cell-card in the base unit that will call “home” to the security company immediately with any alarm of any sort, regardless of whether the home’s power is on or off. We’ve been notified via text message while 50 miles away of a power failure at the house (thunderstorm produced), and then a few minutes later when power was restored – all within less than a minute of the events. We’d get the same with any of the above events as well.

    The nice thing is that such systems may or may not include police/fire notification – that’s the owner’s choice (or circumstances). Yet the personal notifications can still come, including video if you’ve got cameras, to your phone, as long as you’ve got cell reception (our system, Simplisafe, uses a choice of Verizon or T-Mobile for their unit’s transmitter, which is independent of whatever cell system you use).

    #50845
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    GS, I have seen ads for some of the new home security technology, and it really is pretty neat. For us anything that relies on cell phones is iffy as coverage is spotty outside of population centers due to the mountainous nature of this State. Our son installed a booster to make coverage more reliable in the Great Room, but even then we sometimes have problems sending or receiving messages via cell phone. This is why we have a land line phone.

    Our security system does include fire detection for which we would expect rapid response from the local volunteer force. Being my town doesn’t have a public water system anywhere, there aren’t any hydrants to connect to, but the fire dept is slowly installing dry hydrants in river beds to tap into. The old system relied on filling tanker trucks from hydrants in the nearby larger town which was far from ideal. There is one of those dry hydrants just a few hundred feet from my place, and the auxiliary fire station next to that so we’re in pretty good hands that way. Just little in the way of police protection is all.

Viewing 3 posts - 16 through 18 (of 18 total)

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