Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #2134
    Profile photo of Ox
    Ox
    Survivalist
    rprepper

    I think if you have to “bug out”, which is a bad idea if you can avoid it, the American Indian philosophy of have a backup for your backup is a good idea. In other words, they would store enough food for the winter and then double that amount. 3 times the amount they think they needed (if they could). This is not practical with everything, of course. You would need a semi trailer to carry 3 times the amount of a BOB (bug out bag) for a family of 4. But I think fire starting is very important for thinking the rule of 3. We have 4 ways of fire starting: flint and steel, hurricane matches, Zippo lighters and cheapo lighters. 4 different weapons and calibers. Hatchets, knives and machetes. Tents, tarps and ponchos. You get the drift. We always prepare for the worst scenario first, then work backwards from there. This way you know you have your bases covered at the very least and can then concentrate on the finer details of comfort and living.

    #2225
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    I agree with that but I constantly have this battle going on weight vs equipment. When I go on longer trekking trips most of the weight of my backpack comes from the food I carry (it’s all dried food of course but if you carry food for 2 weeks, it adds up, about half a kg for every day).

    Over the years I realized that the most important things for moving from point A to B and sleeping outside in that order are fire equipment, then comes the right clothing and then later on shelter. I usually do not take backup shelters (besides a space blanket). If my shelter breaks (or gets ripped apart by a storm, which happened before) I simply cower down with my different layers of clothing and rain protection. I always try to bring clothing that lets me stay out at night without shelter (even if its uncomfortable).

    These are just some of my ideas on trekking / bugging out. If you have space at your bug out location, things are completely different of course!

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #2282
    elijah
    elijah
    Prepper
    member6

    I like the Rule of 3, but I wonder if it can be combined with something I read about the Roman army; I think it was introduced by Gaius Marius.

    Before he led an army Roman soldiers were land owners which traveled to war with a trail of slaves and a baggage train; it was very slow going. Marius changed it so that the soldiers (principally now made up of Rome’s poor) carried their own kit on their backs and one pack mule shared between a number of soldiers, so they could get to the battle faster.

    There were things that every soldier had to carry, as it was for his personal use and for fighting. But there were other things that were communal and were spread out amongst the other soldiers in his squad (or the Roman equivalent).

    I believe in the Rule of 3 and it’s okay as long as it’s feasible, and fine in there’s a vehicle involved, but if one is on foot the rule may introduce too much difficulty to the primary objective, to get to the destination.

    This is not my area of expertize, so others who know more may have better ideas.

    Bugs Bunny: "I speak softly, but I carry a big stick."
    Yosemite Sam: "Oh yeah? Well I speak LOUD! and I carry a BIGGER stick! and I use it, too!" BAM!

    #2402
    Selco
    Selco
    Survivalist
    member6

    Rule of 3 is great rule, especially when you consider the fact that when SHTF very often nothing work as you planned, so it make great sense to be sure.
    I also pay great attention to be as lightweight as I can, because it means a lot in some situations (usually life and death situation).
    Best choice is usually compromise between “be sure” and “be lightweight”. Also good thing is to have knowledge and skills to use what you have (or what you can find) around you.

    #4774
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    There are different thoughts to the rule of three when it comes to different gear.

    Shelter for example, no one wants to carry a second tent, let alone a third. But a poncho and some para cord can make an impromptu tent/lean to. And if worse comes to worse, those XL trash bags can be used to water proof your sleeping bag, or as a makeshift poncho.
    Or a wikiup liner to keep the snow and rain off.

    Same goes for water purification, no one is going to carry three filters, but a steripen along with a handkerchief and some polar pure tablets cover all the bases.

    Fire? Lighter, matches and ferro rod (metal match).

    Knives? Now here’s my downfall.
    Over the last quarter century my choices changed daily sometimes.

    Regardless of what I have on me, my kit has a small Rapala filet knife in it, it has become the knife I use for 90% of my hunting needs.

    I’m picking up some Mora “puukko’s” for the wife and kids, inexpensive and if they lose or break one, I won’t shed a tear unlike my custom knives.

    I probably carry too many sharp pointy things, but as the camp butcher, I always needed another sharp knife and every body else’s were guaranteed to be dull. When you’re carving up 2-3 deer or elk a day for two weeks, sharp knives are vital.

    Clothing? I keep a seasonal bag next to my BOB, as well as another bag with some good clothes, in case we evacuate and I don’t or can’t wear my woodland clothes.

    Extra socks and underwear? And then some. Wearing the same pants and jacket for days on end is one thing, but clean dry socks?

    3 GPS? One GPS, two compasses, one map, one map sketch with distances, notes and bearings.

    The rule of three is not just three of everything, but three ways to do or accomplish things.

    #4778
    nlouise
    nlouise
    Survivalist
    member4

    Funny, I thought Rule of Three was you can live 3 hours without shelter, 3 days without water, and 3 weeks without food?

    #5205
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    That’s the other rule of 3.

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