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  • #12429
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    The Remington R1

    http://easternplainsgunrunners.webs.com/apps/blog/show/42212711-the-remington-r1

    The Remington R1S

    (Pictures left off this post but in blog entry)

    Much has been written over the years about the 1911 so a history will not be repeated here. However a quick review of the Remington R1S(stainless) is in order. But the jaundiced eye (and hands) of a gunsmith will be looking the gun over.

    The initial examination of the R1 was extremely favorable,the exterior machining is of high quality, no machine marks, the finish even and well executed. The frame, slide and sights did have a minor number of sharp edges and points that would need to be removed for regular/heavy use but the guns exterior was well done.

    Internally, the fit and finish was better than I’ve seen on a current production gun in a number of years. The barrel hood had a minimal amount of movement, the barrel bushing well fit with no looseness but was able to be removed with finger pressure only. Slide to frame fit had a slight bit of movement, but not enough to effect practical accuracy, just enough to leave the gun combat reliable.

    The hammer, sear, disconnector and magazine catch, all appear to be MIM parts, with the associated fill hole markings. Personal preference is to replace these immediately, but this is a customers gun so the factory parts remain until he decides what changes to make.

    The trigger pull is excellent, the series ’80 firing pin safety parts not hindering a good trigger pull, right out of the box. I recommended the customer leave the trigger pull alone, it is that good on this gun.

    Firing the R1, no issues for a large handful of magazines,although the point of impact was literally 4” low at 25Y. The .175” front sight will be replaced with a .150” version to bring point of impact up to point of aim. The group however was enviable and better than some ‘better’ or at least higher priced 1911’s, the gun shot several groups that were well under 2” at 25Y with varied ammo to include mixed factory ball and target handloads.

    The standard spur hammer and grip safety as usual drew blood, the reason I usually replace or at least trim the hammer to avoid this. The short trigger was a little awkward after some 25 years of long trigger use, but it was fit nicely with little slop.

    The original style thumb safety has a small pad but worked nicely, operating positively and only having a little overlap at the back.

    The grips, ‘double diamond’ style are well checkered, fit nicely and are of a good color.

    The high visibility sights are well done, although in this example both are slightly off center to the left. Well regulated as far as windage goes, the group was centered although low as previously mentioned.

    All in all, a good buy if you don’t mind the MIM parts or plan to replace them.

    I’d put a little work into the gun if it were mine, to remove the sharp points, the MIM parts and a proper front sight.

    For the price, an excellent buy and well worth a look.

    #12433
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Thanks Whirlibird! Big fan of 1911. Have a few of them –Springfield & Colt. But go-to SHTF .45 is my Glock 21 with DoubleTap +P 255gr. DoubleTap makes great ammo & family owned in USA. Woods gun is Glock 20 10mm.

    http://www.doubletapammo.net/index.php?route=product/category&path=303_348

    #12442
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    I had a G-21 for years, finally let it go (and the G20) as someone fell more in love with it than I was, going to get both again.
    I prefer the 1911 platform, but being a gunsmith that’s one of my moneymakers. I carry a G30 about 50% of the time, when something smaller is warranted.

    The Doubletap products and similar ammo tend to make me a bit uneasy, having done an autopsy on a Gen4 G-21 that had a case head failure on a friend. The pressures involved are just a bit too close to red line for comfort for me, having been in the industry for 25 years now, I’ve gotten more cautious as I’ve aged.

    Here’s some pics of the result.

    http://s460.photobucket.com/user/whirlibird41/slideshow/KaBoom

    I’ve had case head failures before, thankfully with steel framed guns, hence my preference of them nowadays.

    #12455
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    You can’t beat good 1911 for sure. I’ve had good luck with DoubleTap but you’re caution is warranted. I reload most of the time. Don’t go Gen4 in the 21. It’s great to have a gunsmith with experience.

    #12472
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    I do not own a 1911, I am looking into it, need to know the best one for the best price.

    I own a 9mm, 380, 357 and a 22lr.

    #12477
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Freedom,

    I think the Taurus line has the best pricing for the features.  There are always detractors of Taurus firearms, but then every gunmaker has made a crappy gun from time to time.

    #12478
    SharpDog
    SharpDog
    Survivalist
    member3

    Nothing wrong with Taurus.  I have had three of their wheel-guns for over a decade.  I think they manufacture for S&W.  The thing I dislike about them is their internal gun locks, that’s why I quit buying them.  I myself converted from 1911 to Sig a long time ago but I’m not gonna hijack this thread ;)

    Big Bears Don't Tree

    #12480
    chester
    chester
    Survivalist
    member7

    Freedom, here is 1911 forum that may be a resource for you. http://forums.1911forum.com/

     

    #12483
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    S&W and Taurus were owned by the same conglomerate at one time. They shared some design information.  Now they just copy each other.

    #12486
    Profile photo of freedom
    freedom
    Survivalist
    rnews

    1974, thanks for the info on Taurus, I was looking as one in Bass Pro last weekend.

    chester I will look at the forum, do some reading on them. Thanks.

    #12496
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    I just bought a Rock Island Armory CS 1911A1. It is a single stack 45 acp and falls between the standard 1911 and the officers model. So far it meets or exceeds my expectations. Of course the first three mags tore up my thumb and webbing!

    Robin

    #12503
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    For the money, its hard to beat the Springfield Armory Mil-Spec guns.

    Not the “loaded” guns but the plain vanilla guns. They need very little to be fully ready to run.

    After that, personally its gonna say Colt on the side. Snobbish perhaps but the Colts have fewer MIM parts than any other production gun today for the money and hold together.

    Plus they hold their value,

    Used to be, your hi end smiths refused to work on the cheap 1911s, funny part, they still do. Why? simple, you drop more money in labor and parts making the cheap ones right than you do buying a good one to start.

    So, say $1000 to play with, for me its the temporarily discontinued GI Mil-Spec from Springer. @$675.00

    Add a good barrel, @$150.

    Replace the arched mainspring housing with the flat model, add a long trigger, junk the MIM sear and disconnector, a heavier recoil spring and get a couple of good magazines. @$125.

    That leaves $50 for ammo and I’ll install better sights later. The hammer I’ll just bob off a bit so it doesn’t chew on me.

    All that to make a working gun better?

    Ya, and to make sure it keeps working and so it fits me right.

    Taurus? Mixed opinions, seen too many that were junk from the factory, literally sent half a shipment back for various defects during the unboxing inspection.

    One of my customers runs a Taurus, but it is mostly Colt inside after a rebuild. Its still sloppy but it doesn’t fail anymore.

    If theres places I won’t cheap out its firearms and boots. Doing so with either can get you killed.

    #12517
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    the 1911 out of most manufacturers dont work because of a stacking tolerance problems some work some dont, bs for any gun.The gun was never designed to be mass produced with tolerances without a smith assembling it. Out of the box 1911 you are better off  to get another kind of pistol especially for SHFT. Yes lots work some dont and take too much messing with to get a 7 shot  automatic which is a waste. For its time it was good now it is sub par> you end up having to gunsmith most of them either yourself or with pro to get a functional pistol.  most fail unless a loose feel to them  in a long sequence  training scenario.  Failure is anytime you pull trigger and it does not fire except when mag is empty which is a fools mistake of not counting. A failure in the ammunition is still a problem  though not a gun problem this  type of failure needs to be addressed to but can be looked at as a clearing exercise.

    Just my two cents on a 1911, needing less rounds  because a 45 is a bigger stopper, yes but on average it takes 2.09 hits to stop and a 9 mill 2.45 still three  shots in my book. but one with 7 one with 14+ i look at it as 2 enemies or 4 without a reload if you can hit that well  and in in actual  use that is not going to happen.

    I do carry a 45 as my side but not a 1911. It is not fair to compare the Hk mark 23 to a 1911 not even in same class. Ask your self how long between failures can my gun go. then how accurate am i with it at 25 feet and less (most pistol fights range)   you have some idea  of minimal survivability you have in a close up. Training is the rest and that just takes practice practice practice.

     

    just my two cents
    <div id=”stcpDiv” style=”position: absolute; top: -1999px; left: -1988px;”>9mm Luger# of people shot – 456
    # of hits – 1121
    % of hits that were fatal – 24%
    Average number of rounds until incapacitation – 2.45
    % of people who were not incapacitated – 13%
    One-shot-stop % – 34%
    Accuracy (head and torso hits) – 74%
    % actually incapacitated by one shot (torso or head hit) – 47%  – See more at: http://www.activeresponsetraining.net/an-alternate-look-at-handgun-stopping-power#sthash.TfLcgvsR.dpuf</div&gt;
    <div id=”stcpDiv” style=”position: absolute; top: -1999px; left: -1988px;”>.45 ACP# of people shot – 209
    # of hits – 436
    % of hits that were fatal – 29%
    Average number of rounds until incapacitation – 2.08
    % of people who were not incapacitated – 14%
    One-shot-stop % – 39%
    Accuracy (head and torso hits) – 85%
    % actually incapacitated by one shot (torso or head hit) – 51%  – See more at: http://www.activeresponsetraining.net/an-alternate-look-at-handgun-stopping-power#sthash.TfLcgvsR.dpuf</div&gt;

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