Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 63 total)
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  • #6404
    Ghost
    Ghost
    Survivalist
    member3

    I’ve long been a fan of the khukuri, back in the old days of organized football hooliganism 2 craft knives taped together (close fine cuts hard to repair) were quite popular as were box cutters.

    My father used to have a lump hammer handle with a hole drilled halfway down and filled with lead, kept it down the side of the bed after they were broken into when I was a child.

    If at first you don't succeed, excessive force is usually the answer.

    #7130
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    I learn fighting with a “bo” or fighting stick. I also learn some spear fighting techniques right now and attach the Bushman knife to the front of my bo.

    The added range is pretty awesome and with some practice you become quick and pretty precise with this setup.

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #9243
    Profile photo of lci115lewis
    lci115lewis
    Survivalist
    member3

    My “cane”. It is a small ax head with a spike on the back, mounted on a hard wood shaft, turned out to be the perfect height for a cane for me after I padded the eye with some leather scraps. Plus the shape of the ax head makes a comfortable grip.

    With the long handle it does not take all that much effort to put the spike through 1/2″ plywood.

    Or my monkey fist, it has a 3 ounce steel ball bearing at the core, worked really well for putting holes in drywall so we could get better access to pull it off when remodeling a room, my 8 year old son LOVED doing that, he also used it to break the pieces of old drywall into pieces that would fit into our garbage bin. One of the intentions for making it was to weight a line to make it easier to shake ripe mulberries off the highest branches of our tree.

    Rob

    #9282
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Jay,
    If your opponent doesn’t have a gun, a stout spear is a force multiplier. I have a hickory shovel handle for my bushman. I’m thinking it wont break under adverse conditions.

    #9856
    bushrat
    bushrat
    Survivalist
    member4

    Thanks Selco for the heads up on this blade. Hadn’t really given it any thought before, but after seeing it here, and reading all the good reviews I ordered it for myself. Gotta admit the price is right. Thanks again.

    #9884
    Toby C
    Toby C
    Survivalist
    member6

    Especially for those living in countries with restrictive knife laws, but valid for everyone else as well. I routinely carry a crow (pry) bar in my vehicle. It’s about 18inches/40cms long, and I ground the one end down a little more to make it sharper. Great for multiple scavenging type tasks, indespensible in emergency incidents (we use these a LOT) in the fire dept. and twice now, I have exited my vehicle with this held discreetly but visibly by my side and in both instances the other ‘aggravated’ party seemingly wasn’t so interested in continuing there abuse hurling and decide to ‘keep driving’… :)

    The inertia generated swinging one of these means it is definitely going to make someone’s eyes water if you connect with it, lethality is largely determined by the target you choose to swing for…

    This aside, I also am a huge axe fan, especially given they are exceptionally difficult to defend against. In fact having gamed this for some time, I have not yet seen/found a empty hand ‘high percentage’ defense strategy against axes…

    #9886
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    TobyC
    Run baby run

    #9912
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Sorry I haven’t been around much guys and gals… Springtime is high season for us. Work work work and, oh yeah, more work.

    Right quick, I was inventorying my stuff and I came across a bayonet from one of my ancestors. Old school type, definitely 19th century. The blade was still razor sharp and it is triangular in cross section.

    Did some research and found out that those old guys knew what they were doing – see, the triangular cross-section of the blade resulted in a triangular wound. Literally, a Y-shaped wound. Thing is, from a medical standpoint, the Y-shaped wound is the hardest to stitch closed and most prone to infection, since movement automatically opens it again, no matter how many stitches you put in…

    Meaning, if the original bayonet wound didn’t kill your opponent, then infection and sepsis would do the job later on…

    An old-school bayonet (either the genuine article or a reproduction – no worries, I have plenty of sites that carry them) attached to the end of an ash pole and bolted in place would make one helluva spear… or pike.

    Just for FYI…

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

    #9918
    Profile photo of namelus
    namelus
    Survivalist
    member7

    Always fight dirty to win…. hand full of sand/pepper spray to eyes, there is foaming type of pepper spray that is like shaving cream you wipe it it foams again a show stopper. easy to finish off winded blinded opponent sand is for place where you could get back lash from using spray in confined space. I have short handled steel handled wrapped with carbon fiber handle axe with a spike on other side ( great disarming tool)and a trenching tool with sharpened edges.

    I also wear bracers made of metal to protect for arms learned form real dueling the small cuts on arms from this can lead to real problems in unclean environment especially

    #9923
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    “You can’t fight if you can’t stand, you can’t fight if you can’t see, you can’t fight if you can’t breathe”

    Take away one of those three pillars and you’re done for. So plan accordingly, for both offence an defence.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #10788
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    Tolik,

    What you said about farm implements is true. The grain flail is a great example. Modern day nunchaku use the same principle.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nunchaku

    https://www.google.com/search?q=grain+flail&es_sm=122&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=w21aU-qBF-7KsQS-wYCQDw&ved=0CEAQsAQ&biw=1366&bih=643

     

    #11160
    Jay
    Jay
    Survivalist
    member3

    An old-school bayonet (either the genuine article or a reproduction – no worries, I have plenty of sites that carry them) attached to the end of an ash pole and bolted in place would make one helluva spear… or pike.

    This is a great idea. I look for some inspiration for spearheads that some local metal workers can produce for me in bulk. :)

    Alea iacta est ("The die has been cast")

    #11175
    Lone Eagle
    Lone Eagle
    Prepper
    member3

    Being part Native American, the longbow just comes natural to me. I have several of the old carbon steel tips that render most body armor useless. Once you learn the craft, long range shots come natural.

    I also have a few broad swords, Spartan sword, true Japanese katana(not the cheap stainless crap, but a WW2 bring-back), kukri, Mexican machete(heavy blade, and sharp as a razor), tomahawk, and knives galore. I also learned from a blacksmith the art of blade making. Not a hard job, but time consuming.

    Other weapons include the spiked club, mace(not the spray kind), broad axe, and war club.

    Never challenge a man who has nothing left to lose.

    #12279
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    This is a great idea. I look for some inspiration for spearheads that some local metal workers can produce for me in bulk. :) – Jay

    This is the type of bayonet I had in mind.. triangular in cross section, forged steel. Mounted on the end of an oak or ash stave about 6 or 7 feet long, it would be formidable…

    Amongst other places, they can be found here. These guys also carry pretty good working reproductions of historical firearms that others tend to not carry.. made in India, but still, sturdy, serviceable charcoal burners…

    http://www.middlesexvillagetrading.com/index.shtml

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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    #12286
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    The Mosin bayonet is pretty nasty also .

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