Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 30 total)
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  • #6525
    Darin Prentice
    Darin Prentice
    Survivalist
    member4

    video didnt take, sorry guys.
    ill try to shorten the clip of the homemade backhoe. and see if i can get it to load.

    Prepare, Preserve, Protect...

    #6604
    Darin Prentice
    Darin Prentice
    Survivalist
    member4

    well heres a picture, the video wouldnt load. the motor powers hydrolics, so with the bucket he pulls or pushes his way along, slow but very effective. the rams and motor were bought, i believe the rest was scrap, the ball hitch on the back fits an atachement to the bobcat, they work well together as i drive the bobcat and buddy operates the back-hoe.

    Prepare, Preserve, Protect...

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    #6654
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    Field expedient fox-hole heater…

    Can be used pretty much anywhere. Heard a guy call it a “hobo stove” once… we used to steal empty cans from the mess tent (or wherever we could find them) and make these. Got in trouble a couple times for using them, but I was always the sort to disregard obviously stupid rules…

    Whatever you want to call it, it’s “Hobo Approved” :)

    Step 1. Get an unlined, empty can.. make sure you keep the lid.
    Step 2. Clean the can as best you are able.
    Step 3. Take a “church key” and punch four triangular holes in the sides of the can, down at the bottom.
    Step 4. Take the clean lid and make several sets of cuts. These will be the ‘legs’ of the carburetor.
    Step 5. After you make the sets of cuts, bend each leg down so that the carb looks like a little table and sits level.
    Step 6. Drop the carb down into the can, making sure it sits on the bottom, flat and level.

    Drop a wadded up piece of paper down into the can. Then fill with sticks, shavings, pine cones, whatever happens to be on hand to burn. Light a wooden stick match and insert it through one of the holes in the bottom of the can. It might take more than one to light. If you don’t have any stick matches or don’t want to use them, that wad of paper? Wad it loosely, light it, then drop it in. Pile your sticks, shavings, whatever on top of it once it gets going…

    Obviously, the bigger the can, the more fuel it can hold and burn. If you have a small can (like my demo model) only three holes will be needed for air. Bigger cans, like the size of a can of coffee and larger, you can punch more holes for increased air draw. The “carb” is necessary for air draw. As you add more fuel to burn, more debris forms, which can clog the air holes. The carb prevents that from happening.

    Bigger cans, you can put cookpots on without smothering the fire and boil water, cook soup, etc. We made these out of small cans and then made tiny fires, setting the can in the bottom of a fighting position or bunker to warm us on those cold desert nights… we weren’t supposed to have any open flames, but screw that… cold is cold, and a soldier will find a way…

    Here’s a demo model – proof of concept – that I made from a bean can about an hour ago. Yes, I know the can is lined. It’s a demo model. If you did this with a real lined can and then made a fire, the lining would melt and burning plastic stinks to high heaven, as well as the smoke being bad for you…

    I didn’t invent this. It was shown to me by an old school vietnam veteran Sergeant who was my first platoon sergeant… bless his heart.

    And now, I pass it on to you all.

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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    #6659
    Malgus
    Malgus
    Survivalist
    member8

    couple more pics..

    The wicked flee when none pursueth..." - Proverbs 28:1

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    #6666
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Wow that’s pretty cool Malgus -thanks I’ll give it a shot/practice. Appreciate the instructable/pics

    #6667
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Interesting! Will try one!

    #6668
    Darin Prentice
    Darin Prentice
    Survivalist
    member4

    good idea for portable trade items, a fire starter and stove kit to go.

    Prepare, Preserve, Protect...

    #6925
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    I dont know if this qualifies , and its very minor ……but all my load out gear is German flecktarn , I have a flecktarn molle pack with four GP pouches attached to the sides , the pack itself has no frame , as a 3 day pack , thats not a problem , however I want to have it ready as a go pack . So I got an old Alice pack frame with the shelf , picked up some sheet aluminum , drilled a few holes , and extended the shelf to better cover the entire bottom of the pack , then got some extra webbing and quick release buckles , and attached them to the top and bottom of the frame , so that the entire pack is strapped down vertically , similar to the Modern issue Molle large ruck ( that I also have as a freighter ) . Now I can have my flectarn sleeping bag on top and its secure , the whole set up is now very functional as a BOB . I have a 1 man recon tent strapped to one side underneath the packs compression straps , and a flecktarn compression bag with a change of cloths on the other the same way .

    #8510
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    I have the option to come into getting a couple old shopping carts. Anyone have ideas as what I could possibly use them for?

    The obvious of a wheeled storage thing, but are there other things I could build out of them or repurpose them toward?

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #8514
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    how about a mobile planter ?

    #8599
    BobbyD
    BobbyD
    Survivalist
    member6

    Shopping carts are good……………for?
    I have often looked at them with desire, just because of their obvious utility.
    In bad times it will always be useful to have a way to move quantities of material quickly.
    However, they seem range limited (local, your homestead). The extended terrain is not generally conducive to smooth rolling castor wheels of small diameter like on these carts. If you can work with metal you can easily cut and rebuild them to a wide variety of other functions. However, the latest designs, like at Target, are all plastic. Metal carts would be more versatile and probably stronger.

    #17705
    Profile photo of Anselm
    Anselm
    Survivalist
    member6

    The No-Tech and Low-Tech websites are very rich in ideas. And they link to what Cubans call “technological disobedience”. Because of the U.S. blockade of Cuba for so many decades, the mechanics of that island are probably the most ingenious on the planet. They still keep in good running order American cars of the 1950’s!
    Cubans have had to repurpose everything. A simple example: if the glass of an oil lamp breaks, put a bottle in its place. Cut off the butt of the bottle and you have a perfect glass chimney.

    #20847
    Profile photo of johnnymac
    johnnymac
    Survivalist
    member2

    Metal shopping carts (increasingly less common these days) would be good for:

    -Transporting bulky items in urban terrain
    -Material for animal cages and traps
    -Panels for reinforcing/securing doors/windows
    -Drying rack for clothing
    -Filling with debris and used for barricades

    WARNING: Don’t use wire panels from shopping carts for over-the-fire grills, unless you are certain what types of metals/coatings are on the steel. Some use anti-corrosion alloys that contain nasty stuff like zinc and cadmium to help prevent damage from outdoor storage. The same warning applies to the wire shelves found in old refrigerators.

    However, they seem range limited (local, your homestead). The extended terrain is not generally conducive to smooth rolling castor wheels of small diameter like on these carts.

    That just means that you’re using a “bone-stock” shopping cart. Move up to the “unlimited” class with a few mods, using salvaged items.

    Off-Road Shopping Cart

    #20852
    Profile photo of johnnymac
    johnnymac
    Survivalist
    member2

    “Hi. My name is John, and I am a recovering trash-aholic.”

    My parents were both born, and raised through their teen years, in the Great Depression. Their families were both of modest means, and they grew up with the phrases, “Buy it new. Wear it out. Make it do, or do without.” and “It’ll work/look/burn/taste better, once we knock the dirt off.” My uncles used to take gunny sacks with them to school, so that they could pick up coal along the railroad tracks, that had fallen off coal cars (outside bends are the best places to look, BTW.) One of my prized possessions is a quilt, sewn together from 3″x4″ rectangles of different types of wool cloth, which were fabric samples that a men’s clothing store had thrown out.

    My father is (as am I) an inveterate trash-picker. We can’t stand to throw out anything useful, or allow others to do either. Once, my father noticed a number of the same model of Black & Decker electric lawn-edger appearing on curbs on trash day. Curious, he picked one up, took it home, and examined it. A flaw in the design allowed a piece to work loose, and jam the shaft on which the blade turned. He figured out how to fix the flaw using a very thin washer (which was likely salvaged, too) as a shim. We ended up with three or four of these almost-new edgers, which Dad repaired. One day a neighbor came by to borrow an edger, and Dad just told him to keep it. He even repaired a couple, and then RETURNED THEM to the houses that had thrown them out with notes of explanation.

    The dehumidifier that ran constantly for years in the basement of my old house, was picked off the curb in new, unused condition. I quickly discovered the problem was that the plastic fan blade inside, had slipped off the motor shaft. 30 minutes labor, saved me about $200 for a dehumidifier.

    I have salvaged a number of Coleman liquid fuel lanterns that I seen out for the trash. In each case, long-time storage with old fuel had gummed-up the “generator”. The generator is a brass tube between the mantles, which contains a coiled wire, and pre-heats the fuel before it mixes with the air and passes through the mantles. Removing the generator, soaking it in denatured alcohol, then reassembling, and firing it up with fresh fuel has done the trick every time.

    At the end of a big winter storm, I scan the garbage cans for discarded snow shovels. They are mostly made of crappy plastic, but the grip-handle on the end of the shaft is actually pretty sturdy. They are usually attached with a single sheet-metal screw. I also scan for broken fiber-glass shafted tools, like shovels, hay-forks, potato-diggers, etc. What happens a lot of times, is that people accidentally run over their tool with a vehicle. The fiberglass handle shatters at the point of pressure, but sometimes a short, but usable portion of handle remains. Trim the handle, attach a salvaged grip handle, and you have a nice sturdy “trunk shovel”.

    Thrown-out mops and brooms provide hardwood dowels, fiberglass, or metal tubing.

    I used to have a pistol-style hair-dryer I picked off the curb. It blew air, but no heat. I used it to fire up lump charcoal in my grill, without the need for liquid fuel. Careful though, my buddy used the same idea in a cheap portable grill, and actually burned a hole through the sheet-metal. FUEL+HEAT+OXYGEN (turbo-charged)=OH YEAH!

    Bamboo is a scourge to some homeowners, and I often see piles of it on the curb in the Spring. I’ve made tent poles, walking sticks, improvised sail-mast for a canoe, pole for a jon-boat, a frog gig, and a flag pole for a Scouting event.

    I try to take only what I can use, and leave the rest. This often requires tools to perform quick curb-side “surgery” on trash finds.

    Trash-Picker’s Basic Tool Kit:

    -Work gloves
    -Six-way screwdriver ($5 at Home Depot or Lowes) has Lg and Sm Straight & Phillips, plus 1/4″ Hex and 5/16″ Hex
    -Hacksaw (Battery-powered Sawz-All is even better) ;-)
    -Diagonal cutters or Linesman Pliers (Kleins)
    -Straight-Jawed Vise Grips and/or Pump Pliers (Channel-Locks)
    -Utility knife or pocket knife
    -Small 12″-14″ wrecking bar (Stanley, Wunderbar, etc.)

    Other tools, nice, but not necessary

    -Tubing cutter for copper pipe and EMT (electrical conduit)
    -10″ or 12″ Adjustable Wrench (Crescent Wrench)
    -Bow saw for wood
    -Crowbar
    -Battery-Powered Drill/Driver with nut-drivers
    -Pocket Flashlight
    -Socket wrench (3/8″ or 1/2″ drive) and Metric & Inch Sockets

    #20920
    BobbyD
    BobbyD
    Survivalist
    member6

    Great list jonnymac. I add to this a 4-6 ft. pole with a hook on the end for retrieving stuff burried in a dumpster.
    Leather gloves help to pull out stuff that might be sharp or messy. I find dumpsters behind small businesses and
    industrial parks to be treasure troves. Amazing what people throw away. Extended family stops laughing and criticizing as they benefit more an d more from the finds. Hopefully, they will learn the trade for when that is all that is available.

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