Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #20907
    Mr. Red
    Mr. Red
    Survivalist
    member7

    Okay so this is kind of an overview of how I’ve been prepping/becoming more self reliant over the last few years, and it certainly seems to work well.

    I put things into projects and work toward completing that project in a given time (a month or two usually, or a specific season). That’s what I do to learn the basics of a new skill, and build/make/modify/buy something that will increase my survival odds and make living in a post-disaster world much more comfortable.

    But that’s not it. Along with that “main project”, I also do the weekly and day to day stuff. Pretty much the basic stuff, like check the dates on stored food and rotate the older stuff out, make sure all the important gear is working well, fuel levels, PT (everyone needs to PT. I swam a few KMs today and lifted weights), and other basic day to day and weekly things we do.

    An example of the main project I’ve been working on this summer so far is studying amateur radio and totally revamping my commo set up and plans. Paired with that, and something that is vital for said comms, is another alt.energy set up, specifically solar power which I’ve been looking into more and more (but I’ll have to hold off a bit before really getting into).

    Anyway, that’s just the quick and dirty explanation of how I generally go about things. I’m not trying to become a master at everything a person becoming self reliant needs to know, but I want to be able to know enough so that if I need to, I can get done what needs to be done, at least in its more basic of ways. This also makes things pretty fun, in that I get to learn some new cool stuff every month or so.

    Canadian Patriot. Becoming self-sufficient.

    #20980
    wildartist
    wildartist
    Survivalist
    member7

    Our problem is that we need to make a living meanwhile, so can devote a limited amount of time to what we really want to do… Your strategy is great! Keep preppin’!

    #20982
    Robin
    Robin
    Survivalist
    member8

    You can buy small pvc systems. Nothing more than a cell and built-in charge controller. I keep a battery from a powered wheel chair sitting in a window with the charger attached. When SHTF my battery will charge my Ham equipment.
    Robin

    #21014
    Leopard
    Leopard
    Survivalist
    member8

    I am sharing the day to day routine of some things I do every day. Very simple things that simply need to happen every day to keep us safe, or to save money.
    General things : Put rubber color tags on different keys for identification and to keep them from making to much noise. Keep house keys on your body. 24/7. Prevent being stuck in house in case of fire or attack. Prevent someone to make duplicate keys. Spare keys with yellow key tags at certain rooms in case of fire. With burglar bars on all windows, doors are the only option.
    Keep fire arm on your body while awake. Within reach while sleeping. Put shoes and socks next to bed, with clothes & warm jacket “fire brigade” ready.
    Early morning – Open curtains to warm up the house – safe electricity. Put solar lights in the sun.
    Two way radio (Ham radio). Charge batteries for two hours. It gets used daily.
    Clean chicken area. Clean bowls. Feed and water. Remove eggs.
    Water herb and vegetable garden. Make sure everything around house (burglar bars) and fence/ wall is still in order.
    Tend after seedlings inside the house. Exercise if there is time. Shower/bath water runs through chicken pen instead of the drain. Start work
    Always reverse park vehicle. Plan routes to prevent wasting time and gas (petrol) money. Drive during times when there is less traffic. Take different route to places you visit often. Take different route home.
    Before leaving the house – close some or most curtains. Leave music playing.
    Afternoon: Plan meals ahead and put into cob to cook slowly. Look after animals. Play with dog (stress relieve) Bring fire wood into house (not safe after dark) Waste paper go to fireplace. No personal information to be thrown into rubbish bin. Waste food given to chickens/dog or compost heap.
    Close most windows. Close the curtains early afternoon to prevent criminals to look into the house. Bring portable solar lights in doors.
    Make sure all doors are locked
    Weekly – stuff
    Look after what you’ve got (like our grandparents learned to do during their depression years) Spray/ oil squeaky door hinges and handles. Nothing worse than walking through the house in the dark, but the criminals can hear the doors. Maybe everything just sounds so much louder then?
    During warmer season, plant vegetables in intervals to have availability over longer period.
    Look at sales and specials – stock up.
    Monthly
    Go to shooting range (stress relieve and bit of training) Clean and oil weapons (stress relieve) Nothing like the smell of gun oil.
    Go through vehicle properly to make sure spare wheel is still the correct pressure. Tyres are running down balanced. First aid kit. At coast, power hose the vehicle underneath to prevent rust.
    Deworm animals and humans every three to four months – keep you healthy
    Reverse Osmosis Water filters get replaced at least once a year
    Fire extinguisher though out the building gets checked and replaced just before winter.
    Do Fun stuff : Training. Hand to hand combat. Swimming. Cycling. Trail Walking. Camping. Fishing
    Practice knots, Reading.. SHTF School

    #21027
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    Good for you Mr. Red!

    Leopard – can you even remember when your life was simpler and you didn’t have all those extra things to do, taking up your time, just to try and stay safe? Bless you.

    I use a wall in my office that I simply taped off in squares. Each square is for different aspect of endevour; i.e. water, security, food, shelter, future projects to consider etc. I tack the current list of projects, in order of importance (how I ranked them) in each one. Each project has a complete description and list of materials and estimated cost required for it (if any) and estimated completion time, written out, and each project for each area is kept in a small binder on a shelf below the board for the area/subject it relates to for easy reference.

    I have a mark n wipe board with the months written across the top. Dow the left side is a list of current projects (that were previously ranked in order of importance) and thus I keep track of the timeline/progress.

    I keep a small notebook with me that has a list pasted in it of a master list of materials that will be required for the top 5 projects in each category (if any). This I keep with me in my vehicle. When I am out and about if I see a good deal on something or something in a thrift, restore or even at the free shed at the dump I have the information (used mostly for size/dimensions for materials) that will help me know if it would work for future project, or if i’d just be hauling more junk/stuff to store back to the place.

    Instead of worrying about New Year’s resolutions, I review it all every January and add/delete/modify as needed.

    I just have to try and organize it like this, for me, to feel like I am semi-moving forward with my goals.

    For the more mundane tasks of maintenance of place, preps, etc….there is a calendar (well make that plural) I refer to daily together with the crop/garden calendar and calendar for the livestock (i.e. when to worm, etc).

    #21253
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I’m a highly organized person but I feel like an amateur compared to Leopard & tweva. I don’t do lists, not unlike when I was in college I didn’t take notes. I just keep it all in my head. Just the way I am. Over the past 4 – 5 years I went from living in a small town quasi suburban type community in Western, MA to buying a bug out property in Vermont that was a fixer upper inside & out to now living there fulltime with the renovations complete, a large roof added off the back of the garage/barn to shelter my wood pile, a permanent greenhouse with potting/storage shed attached, a Simple Pump hand pump added to my well, Country Living grain mill bolted to a canning workbench my son & I built, various fruit trees & shrubs planted, a quarter acre veggie garden started, bought an apple press to go with the small orchard that came with the property, and set aside a whole lot more tools and supplies, and until the end of last year worked 50 – 60 hours a week at my paying job. I just keep moving forward on whatever project it is I’m working at. Another things is I accumulated a substantial library of how to type books for future reference as may be needed.

    Going forward I plan to plant more fruiting trees & shrubs this autumn, start making apply cider vinegar for canning purposes, and come to terms with how best to manage my new greenhouse and veggie garden.

    My experience is each new thing I try to do or learn surfaces preps I didn’t realize I needed to have and additional things I need to learn. Even if I don’t become expert I am better off than I was before I started. I am also more confident that I can do even more. Back in the 5 – 10 year window is when I started my first veggie garden and learned how to can various items, make saurkraut and such, make bread, and do hearth cooking. That’s also when I took up shooting and got myself armed.

    There is not a week goes by but that I realize something else I need to set aside or learn. It is by coming to forums like this that some of that comes about.

    And Leopard, if you need bars on your windows, there is a message there shouting at you. I know SA is home, possibly for hundreds of years for your family, but your ancestors and mine reached a point in centuries past when they knew it was time to go.

    #21256
    Profile photo of tweva
    tweva
    Survivalist
    rreallife

    MountainBiker – thanks for your post and for sharing! I, like you, have traditionally kept most everything in my head. I am a very organized person and have been blessed to have a photographic memory on-call. But moving here 4 years ago and running a small business of our size was a real challenge…particularly as I was getting older (something one always hates to admit). I, among other things in preparing for alternative incomes when SHTF, have used my skills at organization, to help other (usually much more wealthier than I) people ‘manage’ their properties. The people that their subconscious knows they need to prepare but are still wrapped up in the /now/). It’s been very interesting. I have now, 2 ‘clients’ I am ‘helping’ to ‘prep’ their large farms. THEY decided my rate…chuckle..not me. It is beyonf generous. They have seen my farm, they have checked out me and my business and my previous ‘big’ business background (haha…and my significant other) and I somehow, not surprisingly really, it checked all the requisite boxes…I ‘qualified’.

    ‘Thei’r biggest ‘thing’ is…organization. They want a quick read on what needs done, why I think that and, of course, what that will cost and a one and 3 year plan.

    The learning involved in truly pursuing self-sufficiency is, I agree with you…amazing. Who the heck knew right?’

    I mention that not only because it may be something, with your background you might want to consider dabbling in as it can be also a bit of a being ‘paid to learn’ – (and I don’t mean being deceitful…just in helping someone able to spend more/do more…even more than the substantial amount you can do one self given your level… is always a learning experience)… but because I understand the transition of managing ‘people’, an ‘industry’ and thing’ a ‘product’, a ‘project’ to….well…this…where we, you and I have met, online.

    Sounds like you and your family are transitioning well an joyfully. I do know your area; have lived/grown/gardened for 6 years or so in northern CT, …if you think I might help just let me know.

    #21267
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Thanks tweva, I’d love to help other manage their properties towards better self sufficiency. That would be fun if somehow such an opportunity came along, and I’ve an eye for the aesthetics so I could make it look good if they want that too. A few details here and there can make a huge difference but most folks are utterly clueless in that regard. There are some rich folks around here with their big properties but most are working class. When looking for a place I avoided the ski resort communities and the traditionally wealthy places and instead looked in areas where average people live. Come a SHTF scenario the last thing I need are a bunch of entitled unskilled affluent people from NY/NJ/CT who’ll arrive with their checkbooks and not much else. What I wanted was a good property that might allow a reasonable level of self sufficiency and I wanted it in more of a working class area where the folks have practical skills. Most of our friends and family thought we were out of our minds to buy what we did but they couldn’t see the potential that I saw, nor did they understand my motivation for distancing myself from the BoWash corridor (the Boston to Washington DC megalopolis for the non-Americans here).

    #21288
    Profile photo of 74
    74
    Survivalist
    rnews

    <div class=”d4p-bbp-quote-title”>tweva wrote:</div>I use a wall in my office that I simply taped off in squares. Each square is for different aspect of endevour; i.e. water, security, food, shelter, future projects to consider etc. I tack the current list of projects, in order of importance (how I ranked them) in each one. Each project has a complete description and list of materials and estimated cost required for it (if any) and estimated completion time, written out, and each project for each area is kept in a small binder on a shelf below the board for the area/subject it relates to for easy reference.

    I have a mark n wipe board with the months written across the top. Dow the left side is a list of current projects (that were previously ranked in order of importance) and thus I keep track of the timeline/progress.

    Tweva, What you describe is a classic Preventive Maintenance Scheduling Chart used in most pre-computerized manufacturing plants. Kudos to you for finding the proper methodology.

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