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  • #42949
    Profile photo of L Tecolote
    L Tecolote
    Survivalist
    member8

    The below video was one of the videos suggested at the end of the video series Rainwater Harvesting and Collection by LDSPrepper that GeorgiaSaint mentioned in his own excellent articles on the same topic.

    Since its date makes it almost three years old, I suspect that it has “made the rounds,” and that some of you may have already seen it. Still, it raises the larger question of just how easily our ordinary activities could “become crimes,” if any of us chances to come to the unfavorable attention of the authorities, or if a regulatory agency gets a budgetary or staff increase, coupled with the demand to justify it.

    Some jurisdictions are in political transition. Does your City/County/State permit water collection? Gardening? Raising livestock? Yard Sales? Home business? Self Defense? Do they plainly allow it, make no comment, merely tolerate it because they have “bigger fish to fry,” passively prohibit it by some little-noticed law left over from the last century, actively prosecute it? Is a permit required? Do they tax it? Could a crank complaint from a well-connected neighbor bring the heat?

    How far away are we from “See Me For Breathing Permits?”

    Cry, "Treason!"

    #42953
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    Here in the soggy East It is hard to comprehend the water laws out West but one of the ironic parts is that whereas the State of Oregon says they own all of the water, I suspect that the State doesn’t take responsibility for flood damage or other damage done by the water that they own.

    There is no doubt but that some jurisdictions go way too far on the regulatory front. It amazes me that the locals allow it to happen with stuff as petty as whether lawns are mowed or veggie gardens are in the front yard, and so forth. Part of the issue is govt. bureaucracies that are free to create new regulations without voter input.

    #42956
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Wyoming encourages pretty much everything you listed.
    Actually sent a letter to defend a local, saying the state would defend him in court over a pond.

    Yes we need home business permits, but that’s because of some idiots some years back.
    The kids on the corner selling lemonade, the cops stop and buy it, same for the deputies.

    Guns and self defense?
    Great laws, very preemptive on the side of the victim.
    Assumed threats and the like.

    Wyoming, not for wimps.

    #42961
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    MountainBiker ,
    As you know , some of the small towns in Maine have laws forbidding franchised businesses , forgot the actual term , but what it means is that you will not find a Wallmart , Burger King , etc. in that town , only locally owned and operated businesses ……………..kind of refreshing .

    #42962
    Whirlibird
    Whirlibird
    Survivalist
    member10

    Last I knew, walmart wasn’t a franchise.

    #42965
    Tolik
    Tolik
    Survivalist
    member10

    Your right , but the ordinances cover those chain stores as well . They wanted to achieve two things by doing that , firstly , keep local business alive , and to preserve the look and flavor of the town , by not allowing modern American generica . It also helps to control growth , many small Maine towns are happy with the way they are . I can understand that , if people want that , they can drive to Portland or elsewhere , not a hardship in that part of the country , as everything is fairly close together .

    #42969
    Profile photo of MountainBiker
    MountainBiker
    Survivalist
    member10

    I know what you mean Tolik. The way in which Town Meeting gives locals control of zoning and such things is usually a good thing. In my former town Town Meeting passed zoning that precluded restaurants having drive-throughs. That kept out McDonalds and all the rest of the chains out, in turn helping protect the tourist industry that was so important to the community. Tourists didn’t come to town to see strip malls and fast food joints. Carefully worded zoning also kept out any kind of big box retail operation for the same reason. Whereas big out-of-town money might be able to buy politicians in many jurisdictions, it is all but impossible to buy an entire electorate at Town Meeting.

    Here in VT, though Town Meeting has great control, certain things are deemed so important that the State exercises control of much of the commercial and suburban type development so as to protect the tourism industry (which is the State’s largest industry). The entire State is effectively a tourism zone and so for the past 50 years at least the State has worked to protect the look and feel of the State to the extent that they can, mostly with commercial development. Things like there not being any billboards along the roads and not letting farmland at interstate exits get converted to gas stations and fast food joints like you see nationwide. They more recently are trying to force commercial development into existing developed town areas so as to stop/slow the sprawl effect. Single family homes and trailers along existing roadways is entirely off-limits for the state though. Individual rights to live where and how you please are strongly protected. Many towns have no zoning at all. Those that do usually keep it pretty simple.

    #42982
    Profile photo of sledjockey
    sledjockey
    Bushcrafter
    member8

    Out here in the PNW there are a lot of foreign companies that have raped and pillaged our resources. Much of the cut old growth was transported and sunk in Tokyo harbor for later use (just as one example), recycled materials being transported overseas at the taxpayer’s expense to be remanufactured and sold back to us later on, etc…. The list is actually quite huge. Now the states here force their ownership upon everyone that doesn’t cut the politicians a backdoor deal: Want better fishing? Bribe someone and become a “subcontractor for a tribe.” Better hunting? “Donate” appropriately and the regulations will change in your favor…..

    It’s all corrupt and the average citizen in the one left wondering if it was sawdust or gravel that was used as lube this time.

    http://ageofdecadence.com

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